Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Rebuild Campaganolo Ergopower Shifters?

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Rebuild Campaganolo Ergopower Shifters?

Old 01-27-15, 12:13 AM
  #1  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rebuild Campaganolo Ergopower Shifters?

With some trepidation, I am going to rebuild my Campagnolo shifters. These are Record 10 speed, I believe from 2008 or earlier, anyway ihey have carbon blades and are the shape prior to the current inward-curving shape, and could I be any vaguer.

A couple of questions, if anyone might want to field them:

1. Is it important to mount the levers at the end of a handlebar held in a vise, as I see in some videos? Can you do it freehand? I'm just thinking holding the levers over a tray might make it easier to not lose little bits.

2. I count five springs per lever: thumb button return spring, G-spring (2), finger lever return spring, coil spring. Which of these should be replaced?

3. Is it advised to replace any other wear items? Do the washers or bushings wear out?

4. Are there any upgrades that should be done "while one is in there"? I'm not sure if improved parts have been introduced.

5. You don't lubricate the mechanism, right?

6. What are the small shifter parts that you would stock up on now, because they are likely to be discontinued in a couple years?

7. Are the parts on Amazon "genuine" or good enough? Would you buy from Branford instead?

Thank you. I have been intimidated by this, but we now have two bikes with Ergopower in the family and it seems that I'd better learn to rebuild them.

P.S. The specific problem I'm having is that the right shifter won't hold in the larger cogs. The left shifter seems fine. I don't know how many miles are on the pair, I bought them used.

Last edited by jyl; 01-27-15 at 12:17 AM.
jyl is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 05:59 AM
  #2  
Greenfieldja
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Belgium
Posts: 1,032
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Replace the G-springs in your right shifter. Also, inspect the carrier that the G-springs mount in for cracks and replace if necessary as well.

If you intend to keep these shifters for any length of time, one might want to stock up on a few sets of G-springs and a couple of carriers.

I cannot attest for the quality of parts from any particular source but will offer that you should stay away from the aluminum spring carriers if you come across them. Logic would dictate the metal one would be stronger than the plastic one...in this case logic would be wrong as the metal ones have a higher failure rate than the plastic ones.

It is not necesssary to mount the shifter like you see in the videos but it supposedly facilitates the repair process as it allows both your hands to be free to manipulate tools and the parts of the shifter. An old handlebar or piece of pipe similar in diameter clamped in a vice may be useful.

Good luck with your rebuild.

-j
Greenfieldja is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 08:13 AM
  #3  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thank you. I'll start ordering parts. (Edit: turns out Universal has them, and I can simply pick the order up on my way home - handy.)

No lube to be used, right?

I realize that I have some 9 speed Record Ti shifters in the bin too, one is in pieces with, supposedly, the necessary springs for a rebuild. Maybe I will tackle those first, as experience. I'm not sure what use I have for them, but maybe I can use them on another bike.

Last edited by jyl; 01-27-15 at 12:24 PM.
jyl is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 09:02 AM
  #4  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11,611

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1734 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 35 Posts
I've serviced a number of Ergo levers of varying vintages and gear count and ALWAYS used grease to lube them. Basic Phil green most of the time with synthetic a couple of times (didn't note any performance differences). A thin coating on all the internals should be enough. Andy.
Andrew R Stewart is online now  
Old 01-27-15, 10:54 AM
  #5  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ah, okay. A bit of grease. Thanks.
jyl is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 01:00 PM
  #6  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,799
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 592 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by jyl View Post
With some trepidation, I am going to rebuild my Campagnolo shifters. These are Record 10 speed, I believe from 2008 or earlier, anyway ihey have carbon blades and are the shape prior to the current inward-curving shape, and could I be any vaguer.

A couple of questions, if anyone might want to field them:

1. Is it important to mount the levers at the end of a handlebar held in a vise, as I see in some videos? Can you do it freehand? I'm just thinking holding the levers over a tray might make it easier to not lose little bits.
2. I count five springs per lever: thumb button return spring, G-spring (2), finger lever return spring, coil spring. Which of these should be replaced?
3. Is it advised to replace any other wear items? Do the washers or bushings wear out?
4. Are there any upgrades that should be done "while one is in there"? I'm not sure if improved parts have been introduced.
5. You don't lubricate the mechanism, right?
6. What are the small shifter parts that you would stock up on now, because they are likely to be discontinued in a couple years?
7. Are the parts on Amazon "genuine" or good enough? Would you buy from Branford instead?
P.S. The specific problem I'm having is that the right shifter won't hold in the larger cogs. The left shifter seems fine. I don't know how many miles are on the pair, I bought them used.
You had more than 2 questions. Answers:

1. Get a throwaway set of alu handlebars. Saw one end off of the bar, and clamp the shifter to the stub. Clamp the stub in a vice. Freehand re-assembly of the shifters impossible.
2. Replacements: only the two G-springs need to be replaced. The right-hand springs wear out much faster than the left due to the relative shifting frequency.
3. No.
4. If the metal G-spring carrier is not broken - it will eventually. Probably better to just replace it with the composite version while you're digging away. You can buy the right-hand spring carrier with the 2 G-springs for about $20.
5. ?? Everything should be greased of course. Make sure you flush out and regrease the 2 tiny ball-bearing units on the Record and Chorus shifters. Grease is most critical in the interface between the G-springs and the ratchet ring. I use heavy, sticky, snot-like grease.
6. Discontinued? You'll be able to easily source replacement parts on Ebay for the next 20 years. However, I have a stash of right-hand G-springs, replacement carriers and right-hand thumb springs. Except for hoods, nothing wears out on the left side.
7. Does Amazon actually sell anything? Don't know. I thought they were agents like Ebay. As long as they are Campagnolo parts, you are OK. I have never seen aftermarket or fake Campy shifter parts. Tiny market.

Keep a meticulous record of the order of parts and their orientation on disassembly. Remove the brake blade and the hoods before you start. Make sure you have lots of illumination and time. Do not rush. This is a Zen thing. Good luck.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 01:15 PM
  #7  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks Dave! Ordered carrier + G-springs for right, also G-springs for left just for fun.

I was confused about the greasing because it wasn't mentioned in the how-to's I read. Glad you guys set me straight.
jyl is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 01:56 PM
  #8  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,799
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 592 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by jyl View Post
Thanks Dave! Ordered carrier + G-springs for right, also G-springs for left just for fun.

I was confused about the greasing because it wasn't mentioned in the how-to's I read. Glad you guys set me straight.
One more hint that could save you hours of misery.. The winding up of the coiled spring is the hardest steps on re-assembly.

The shifter must be immobilized pointing downwards. You need to keep some pressure from the front of the shifter guts (with an allen key) during this critical step. A medium-sized flat-blade screwdriver can be used to wind the spring.

You may need 3 hands for this. One to apply the upwards pressure on the allen key. Second hand to wind up the (fragile) alu bolt that fixes the spring. A third hand to push down to immobilize the bolt once it is wound.

Everything else, except maybe for installing hoods, is a piece of cake.

BTW: pre-warm the hoods, and give them a thin coat of soapy water for lubrication prior to stretching them on.

Good luck.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 03:10 PM
  #9  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I confess it isn't clear from the videos I've watched exactly how the spring winding happens. I surmise the nose of the spring bushing aka bolt (part 15 in the exploded diagram linked below) engages with the end of the central shaft (part 7) when it is fully depressed, so it is a matter of winding the bolt until the coil spring is fully compressed, then pressing it down to engage, and once engaged the bolt won't unwind . . . something like that?

Campagnolo Ergo Lever Parts (1998-2008) - Branford Bike - Seattle/Bellevue - Campagnolo Pro Shop
jyl is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 04:10 PM
  #10  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,799
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 592 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by jyl View Post
...so it is a matter of winding the bolt until the coil spring is fully compressed, then pressing it down to engage, and once engaged the bolt won't unwind . . . something like that?
Exactly. You have it. Jeez.. finally someone on these forums who can write coherent sentences.

You have to rotate the bolt with a flat blade screwdriver in order to wind up the coiled spring. But it is not yet engaged with the central shaft. When it is appropriately wound, you have to push the bolt down to engage. Once engaged, do no sneeze or jiggle anything or it will pop out. Finally, you have to (carefully) bolt down the big silver covering washer.

My hint was to make sure there is some pressure upwards on the central shaft, in order for the bolt engagement to occur. If you don't do this, you will be mystified as to why engagement does not occur.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 04:41 PM
  #11  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 5,214

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 969 Post(s)
Liked 36 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
You have to rotate the bolt with a flat blade screwdriver in order to wind up the coiled spring. But it is not yet engaged with the central shaft. When it is appropriately wound, you have to push the bolt down to engage. Once engaged, do no sneeze or jiggle anything or it will pop out. Finally, you have to (carefully) bolt down the big silver covering washer.
I'll have to try it this way next time. I've always started with the spring engaged at the center, and slipped the spring off the screwdriver onto the post on the edge.

One of the online sources I've seen says something about this stage like, "If you get this the first time, you are God." I was very proud of myself the first time I rebuilt one and it worked the first time -- only to find out the carrier was cracked, and I had to re-do the whole thing over again.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 05:06 PM
  #12  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Are the 2009 and later Ergopower levers easier or harder to work on?. I watched one of those videos by mistake, and the various bits seemed less accessible than on the 2008 and earlier levers.

And, as long as I'm learning about brifters, are Shimano and SRAM shifters easier or harder to rebuild, compared to the Campagnolo shifters? Which do you consider more durable?
jyl is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 06:04 PM
  #13  
Dfrost 
Senior Member
 
Dfrost's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,367

Bikes: 87 Marinoni SLX Sports Tourer, 79 Miyata 912 by Gugificazione

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 273 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Several sets of Campy 8-spd Ergo brifters around our house are approaching 20 years old (one has been in continuous use on my wife's only bike that gets ridden 1500-2000 miles/year), and still working very well. I recall rebuilding two RH (rear) brifters, and one LH brifter in that time. Pretty sure that newer ones of the rebuildable types didn't lose any durability. OTOH, my son's Dura-Ace 9-spd LH brifter stopped pulling cable after about 6 years. Could have replaced the entire brifter at considerable cost even from eBay, but we decided to just use a DT shifter from my bin for his very rare front shifts. There are instructions out there on flushing or replacing some elements of Shimano brifters, and others will have to answer about SRAM.
Dfrost is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 07:11 PM
  #14  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11,611

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Raleigh Pro, Trek Cycle Cross, Mongoose tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1734 Post(s)
Liked 48 Times in 35 Posts
I use a 4mm allen wrench held upright in a bench vise to place the front of the shifter axle on during the reassembly. I've thought about clamping the body on a bar but never tried it as the allen wrench method seems to work for me. Andy.
Andrew R Stewart is online now  
Old 01-27-15, 07:16 PM
  #15  
headloss 
Lost at sea...
 
headloss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Western PA
Posts: 935

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount (match), Trek 520, random bits and pieces...

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
Make sure you have lots of illumination and time. Do not rush. This is a Zen thing. Good luck.
That was good for a belly-laugh.

Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
One of the online sources I've seen says something about this stage like, "If you get this the first time, you are God." I was very proud of myself the first time I rebuilt one and it worked the first time -- only to find out the carrier was cracked, and I had to re-do the whole thing over again.
... and a snort

Last edited by headloss; 01-27-15 at 07:22 PM.
headloss is offline  
Old 01-27-15, 07:26 PM
  #16  
headloss 
Lost at sea...
 
headloss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Western PA
Posts: 935

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount (match), Trek 520, random bits and pieces...

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jyl View Post
Are the 2009 and later Ergopower levers easier or harder to work on?. I watched one of those videos by mistake, and the various bits seemed less accessible than on the 2008 and earlier levers.

And, as long as I'm learning about brifters, are Shimano and SRAM shifters easier or harder to rebuild, compared to the Campagnolo shifters? Which do you consider more durable?
2009+ just swap out shifter-body as opposed to replacing spring&carrier. The bodies are all over the net and average about $90... better than buying an entire shifter. Nothing as simple as a g-spring, but the need to rebuild is less likely. 2009+ is technically not "user serviceable" beyond that, but people have at the very least swapped out levers in order to have the alloy Athena levers matched to Record/Chorus Ultrashift.

Shimano shifters... a few brave souls have done this. There are instructions out there if you search. From what I've read/heard, I imagine it's at least 10x more frustrating than rebuilding an Ergo.
Haven't heard of anyone rebuilding a SRAM shifter.
headloss is offline  
Old 01-28-15, 10:59 AM
  #17  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,799
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 592 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
I use a 4mm allen wrench held upright in a bench vise to place the front of the shifter axle on during the reassembly. I've thought about clamping the body on a bar but never tried it as the allen wrench method seems to work for me. Andy.
I learned something today. This is a better approach to my bar-clamp method, as the allen key will not only immobilize the shifter, but provide the necessary upwards force required during the coiled-spring rewinding. Hence one less hand needed.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 01-29-15, 04:35 PM
  #18  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sunnyvale, CA USA
Posts: 5,678
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 268 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by headloss View Post
2009+ just swap out shifter-body as opposed to replacing spring&carrier. The bodies are all over the net and average about $90... better than buying an entire shifter. Nothing as simple as a g-spring, but the need to rebuild is less likely. 2009+ is technically not "user serviceable" beyond that, but people have at the very least swapped out levers in order to have the alloy Athena levers matched to Record/Chorus Ultrashift.
Conceptually Ultrashift levers work the same as their predecessors - there's a rotating cable drum with take-up (front lever) and let-out (thumb button) ratchets. With Ultrashift the index cam is fixed with the spring-loaded mechanism moving; pre-Ultrashift it was the cam that moved with stationary G-springs; and before ergo the cam was fixed with three moving G-springs in the downtube lever.

The spring mechanism is the big difference. G-springs rub against the cam which abrades them, and the short length of metal flexing back and forth fatigues then breaks like a paperclip bent too many times. Ultrashift has ball bearings which roll over the cam backed by coil springs which should have an indefinite fatigue life.

The Ultrashift levers also lack the flimsy spring carrier which tended to break.

2006 G-spring Centaur lever parts diagram. Everything with an EC-RE part number is shared with shifters through Record - it's just bushings not bearings and brake/shift levers which differ. Later Record also got a lower friction right cam. Note the broken carrier.



2009 Centaur Ultrashift parts diagram predating the small parts discontinuation. Everything with an EC-SR part number is shared with all shifters through Super Record. The rear ratchets are Record level and weigh 7g more per pair than Super Record; index cam/ratchet 10 not 11 speed, and brake blades the only differences. All levels got a rolling change to ball bearings. The pair of 10-speed index cams are the revised (later 2009 and 2010) version on the left with stiffer clicks and the original on the right.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
second_gen_g_spring.jpg (42.6 KB, 146 views)
File Type: jpg
second_gen_index_cam.jpg (83.5 KB, 146 views)
File Type: jpg
ultrashift_good_and_bad.jpg (59.3 KB, 144 views)
File Type: jpg
ultrashift_mechanism.jpg (47.7 KB, 145 views)
File Type: jpg
centaur.jpg (77.8 KB, 145 views)
File Type: jpg
centaur_ergo.jpg (75.3 KB, 147 views)

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 01-29-15 at 06:07 PM.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 01-29-15, 06:02 PM
  #19  
Drew Eckhardt 
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sunnyvale, CA USA
Posts: 5,678
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 268 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by jyl View Post
With some trepidation, I am going to rebuild my Campagnolo shifters. These are Record 10 speed, I believe from 2008 or earlier, anyway ihey have carbon blades and are the shape prior to the current inward-curving shape, and could I be any vaguer.

6. What are the small shifter parts that you would stock up on now, because they are likely to be discontinued in a couple years?
G-springs and carriers. They can wear out often (I got a few years out of mine with carriers cracking every other replacement), and at some point Campagnolo may discontinue them as they did other first generation small parts and Ultrashift internals.

The front lever return spring and thumb lever spring eventually fail too. A spare for each should be fine.

The tiny ratchet spring included in the front paddle assembly also fails; having one of those on hand might be good. I finally retired my 1997 levers and moved on to 10 cogs with Ultrashift when that broke after a rebuild that went with replacing the failed front spring using the last one in Ochsner's inventory.

I had left G-springs plus a carrier on hand just in case, but don't recall ever needing to deal with the front shifter.

7. Are the parts on Amazon "genuine" or good enough? Would you buy from Branford instead?
Genuine.

P.S. The specific problem I'm having is that the right shifter won't hold in the larger cogs. The left shifter seems fine. I don't know how many miles are on the pair, I bought them used.
They do that. G-springs and/or carrier are the culprit.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 01-29-15 at 06:06 PM.
Drew Eckhardt is offline  
Old 01-29-15, 08:28 PM
  #20  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, that went smoothly, I think.

I started out by removing the cables and then removing the lever from the bar clamp. Then I discovered that I couldn't remove the hood, with only a loose lever body to hang on to. In the end I disassembled the lever with the hood on . . . then removed the hood. Sigh.

But after that, everything was easy, thanks to all of your help.

Except that, when I was done, I freaked out because there were two washers on my bench that hadn't been there before. A little one and a big one.

I tore the entire lever down again and watched the video again, put it back together, did it again . . . Finally I figured out that - I think - the little one was part #26 Cartridge Bearing Spacer that fits over the #7 Pivot Shaft and had somehow been overlooked, and the large one was #25 G Spring Carrier Teflon Coated Bushing which was now surplus to requirements since I'd installed the new carbon carrier with its own version of #25 . I hope that's right. Anyway, the lever (appears to) work.

In the end I disassembled and reassembled the lever three times, and got rather comfortable with the process.

Now I am off to the hardest part, so I am told, which is getting the hood back on. I mounted the bare lever body on the bar, having learned my lesson.
jyl is offline  
Old 01-29-15, 09:56 PM
  #21  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, the hood was easy too. So I am no longer intimidated by Ergopower levers.

But now I am having problems with the set up. I'll start another thread about that, if I can't solve it. I think I have a derailleur hanger problem. :-(

Last edited by jyl; 01-30-15 at 12:54 AM.
jyl is offline  
Old 05-21-17, 09:21 AM
  #22  
elhalpern
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Capagnolo Ergo 8 Parts

I got frustrated with the lack of rebuild parts for Campy's Ergo 8 Speed. Fortunately, the G-Springs continue to be used in the latest models and it's just the spring carrier that can't be had...

So, I modeled it in 3D and shared the model on thingiverse.com After verifying fit, I'm having one printed in brass infused steel via the online service i.materialize.com so for US$31.5 I'll get a new and stronger parts in my mailbox this week.

I also created and tested a version of the plastic end cap that slides into the back of the grip and helps mount it against the bars. This is a fine use for ABS or PLA using a cheap 3D printer.

Both of these files are STL and can be printed or even modified by those who know 3D CAD software.

Enjoy !
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Ergo 8 End Cap EC-RE024 b.jpg (79.6 KB, 62 views)
File Type: jpg
ergo 8 rh spring carrier.jpg (44.2 KB, 62 views)
File Type: jpg
Ergo 8 End Cap EC-RE024.jpg (30.9 KB, 62 views)
elhalpern is offline  
Old 08-15-17, 04:22 AM
  #23  
elhalpern
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ergo 8 Spring Carrier

Campagnolo's EC-RE011 can be successfully 3D printed in steel (bronze infused) for less than US$32.
I now have more than 500 miles on my printed part and it works perfectly.
Search Campagnolo on Thingiverse.com

-eric
elhalpern is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
LowCel
Road Cycling
59
03-31-08 02:35 PM
Clarks
Advocacy & Safety
39
12-07-07 10:57 PM
mkauffman
Touring
15
06-29-07 08:38 AM
ShifTee
Introductions
3
01-06-06 07:32 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.