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Spare parts before your group set gets "old"

Old 02-23-15, 01:33 PM
  #1  
bumbles
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Spare parts before your group set gets "old"

I recently went from a 9 speed setup (6500 and 7700) to 11 speed (6800) partially because I was getting frustrated with parts availability. I couldn't justify spending $140+ on used shifters that may or may not work for long. I'm also coming from a perspective that gets REALLY excited over the idea of New Old Stock.

I'm sure many of you prefer to wait for deals on used gear but if you're in a pinch and need a replacement part (like a shifter) it can clear out your funds quicks.


So my question is... if you plan on getting many many many years out of a new group set, aside from obvious consumables (chains, cassettes, cables) what parts would you be willing to buy new before inventories deplete?


Also, when is the best time to buy them? For example, is 10 speed stuff decently affordable right now compared to 11? How much longer will one be able to buy brand new 10 speed stuff? Are things already disappearing?

I suspect in 2-4 years I should start thinking about picking up some new 11 speed shifters just to have, and maybe some chain rings if I can find good deals. Do you guys do this or do you just move on? And a technical bit...to what extent are the 11 speed shifters rebuildable unlike the 9 speed stuff? I see spare parts for sale on ebay.

and something to look at:

Last edited by bumbles; 02-23-15 at 01:35 PM. Reason: forgot to add the technical bit
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Old 02-23-15, 01:43 PM
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bike shops source repair parts all the time for repairing older bikes. & you always can use the Auction thing to buy Other people's Parts.


++ Dont Crash ... Im still using the Campag RD I bought in the 70's..
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Old 02-23-15, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by bumbles View Post
. . . So my question is... if you plan on getting many many many years out of a new group set, aside from obvious consumables (chains, cassettes, cables) what parts would you be willing to buy new before inventories deplete? . . .
Your question (durability) doesn't go with Dura Ace, Ultegra, 105 . . . maybe next time shop for Claris or Sora.
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Old 02-23-15, 02:40 PM
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For what itís worth Iím still running Shimano 8-speed on my road bikes. 8 speed cheat sheet:

- Chains/cassettes: still readily available new
- Chainrings: Iíve used 10-speed stuff without issue. Iíve also built up quite an inventory of BiopaceÖ
- Hubs: 8/9/10 speed is the same so no issue there
- Rear derailers: again, 8/9/10 is compatible. Easily available.
- Downtube shifters: difficult to find but last forever
- Bar-end shifters: available new
- Brifters: Campy 10-speed brifters shift a Shimano 8S drivetrain beautifully (same cable pull.) Currently still available new from Veloce all the way to Record.
- Front derailers: This is the toughest one in my opinion but still not that difficult. Caution! Itís nearly impossible to tell from pictures if a front derailerís pivots are in good shape or shot. I try to go for NOS or ones appearing in excellent condition.
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Old 02-23-15, 02:50 PM
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Step down to a lower level of the new components. With trickle-down technology, they are probably as good as your older high-end, possibly better.

Of course, us bottom feeders don't seem to face obsolescence at the same frequency as those of you using higher end component groups.
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Old 02-23-15, 02:58 PM
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FastJake, the new Shimano Claris brifters are 8-speed and getting pretty good reviews.
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Old 02-23-15, 03:04 PM
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I bought a set of 6600 brifters on clearance when 6700 came out. The rest of it I figure will be available for a while.
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Old 02-23-15, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by bumbles View Post
For example, is 10 speed stuff decently affordable right now compared to 11?
Interesting how it works in different areas of the world, I need a new LH 6700 shifter, and it's looking to be more cost effective to change to 5/6800 & go 11 speed as they are far cheaper than replacement 6700 parts..

Wouldn't count on high end 10 speed parts being around for long, the supply will dry up with in the next 18 months or so with Tiagra being the highest currently available now, for spares, with Shimano you can normally expect 10 years support, Campagnolo is similar, although have had issues recently getting parts from anything over the 10 year mark.
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Old 02-23-15, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by radeln View Post
FastJake, the new Shimano Claris brifters are 8-speed and getting pretty good reviews.
I should give those a try, but I prefer the Campy style shifter with thumb button. Also, after a quick search the cheapest new pair of Claris shifters were $140. At this time I don't see a reason to buy those when I can get new Veloce for ~$125. Or new Record for $330

I'm a huge Shimano fan and Campagnolo's brifters are about the only thing I prefer over Shimano.
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Old 02-23-15, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by bumbles View Post
So my question is... if you plan on getting many many many years out of a new group set, aside from obvious consumables (chains, cassettes, cables) what parts would you be willing to buy new before inventories deplete?
For me, it's all about considering the availability of repair parts, now and over the foreseeable life of the component, and the cost of repair parts versus cost of replacement.

For example, g-springs and carriers in my 2006 Campagnolo 10-speed shifters are known to fail when worn. They're currently available for just a few bucks, but may not be available in a few years. Replacement shifters will probably be available for a while, but with at least a three-digit price tag. I picked up a couple of g-springs and carriers as five-dollar insurance.

For another example, my road bike has a square taper Campagnolo Veloce crankset. Since Campy has migrated all their cranksets to external bearing designs, their square taper bottom brackets are going the way of the dinosaurs. I found a compatible Campy Centaur bottom bracket on clearance for a fraction of its original price, so I scooped it up. When my current bottom bracket eventually dies, I'll just swap in the Campy Centaur BB instead of having to buy a new crankset or 3rd-party replacement.
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Old 02-23-15, 05:07 PM
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once i build my bikes the way i want them, i haven't found much reason to buy anything other than tires, and the occasional tube or chain.
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Old 02-23-15, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by bumbles View Post
So my question is... if you plan on getting many many many years out of a new group set, aside from obvious consumables (chains, cassettes, cables) what parts would you be willing to buy new before inventories deplete?
Shifters and rear derailleurs.

Replacing either with new (100% life remaining) components with matching functionality and aesthetics may prove impossible before you're ready to move on to new cogs.

For instance, Campagnolo no longer sells 10 speed Ultrashift levers which can shift five cogs smaller per lever actuation. You can still buy a replacement right mechanism although it's unclear how long that will remain an option.

I have a spare NOS pair of 2010 Veloce levers I got before the bike shops ran out in 2010. I paid less including new cables than people sell used sets for without today. Minus the included cable set and hoods which are wear items I'll definitely use I paid less than I'd spend for just a replacement mechanism.

They no longer make attractive silver alloy long cage rear derailleurs with carbon accents.

I have a spare NOS long cage 2006 Record rear derailleur that I just picked up for reasonable (considering the Record name) money although that's for a odd part with reduced demand now that many people prefer compact cranks for which a medium or short cage is sufficient.

Front derailleurs last pretty much indefinitely and should be OK used.

How much longer will one be able to buy brand new 10 speed stuff?
For a long time, although you might be limited to lower groups with reduced functionality (Sora with thumb buttons high on the levers) or offensive aesthetics (glossy black anodizing, matte black powder coat, white, or whatever the next trend is).

NOS collector items on ebay may still be an option, although that often costs a lot - like $200 silver Campagnolo hubsets which now sell for $500.

Are things already disappearing?
Yes.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 02-24-15 at 11:01 AM.
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Old 02-24-15, 12:35 AM
  #13  
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If you are concerned about the near term, repair from a race crash for example, I'd agree that an extra set of brifters would be valuable assuming you timed the purchase to coincide with appropriate sales discount. But buying for some use well down the road, a time frame beyond a few years, would be wasteful imo. Life is uncertain and what seems highly likely today may be a distant possibility tomorrow (re: your needs and wants).

Edited to add, this sounds horrible and I would never wish it on you, what if your bike was stolen? You probably wouldn't want spare parts then.

Last edited by cale; 02-24-15 at 12:39 AM.
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Old 02-24-15, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by cale View Post
Edited to add, this sounds horrible and I would never wish it on you, what if your bike was stolen? You probably wouldn't want spare parts then.
Very good point and I really hope my bike doesn't get stolen! Think of all the time "wasted" in researching parts online!


Thanks for the responses everyone. One thing that jumped out to me is the comments about maybe I shouldn't be using a high end group set like Ultegra if I want longevity. I'm not sure I buy this perspective. My 9 speed stuff is still ticking after 16 years. I did have a RD incident, but everything else is still working. I've seen the shifters stop working on another bike but the group I'm still using works fine. What exactly can you point to that illustrates poor longevity in terms of design and materials? I've read the most about people talking about Dura Ace this way...maybe the titanium cogs and the lightweight chains are of slightly less durability, but saying that one can't expect a lot of years out of an Ultegra group puzzles me. After all, these parts are made if factories of higher precision than their lower end counterparts.
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Old 02-24-15, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
Shifters and rear derailleurs.
Thats basically what I was thinking. I think it comes down to grabbing the stuff when the deals present themselves.
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Old 02-24-15, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
... although you might be limited to lower groups (Sora with thumb buttons high on the leers) or offensive aesthetics (glossy black anodizing, matte black powder coat, white, or whatever the next trend is).
Good points. If you are someone who is concerned about the look (myself) my own tastes may change. No sense committing to something that I won't even "be into" years down the road. I'm hoping more "classic" aesthetics come back in group set design.
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Old 02-24-15, 07:51 AM
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Shifters tend to keep on working... until they don't. This is true of Ultegra and 105 and Sora and 2200 etc.

But for other parts, derailleurs for instance, the higher end stuff actually does last longer. An ultegra derailleur isn't going to survive a crash any better than a Tiagra, but IME the pivots take longer to wear out in the Ultegra. A three or four year old bike with tiagra that has been well used will generally have a lot more slop in the moving parts than a bike with Ultegra would have.
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Old 02-24-15, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
For me, it's all about considering the availability of repair parts, now and over the foreseeable life of the component, and the cost of repair parts versus cost of replacement.

For example, g-springs and carriers in my 2006 Campagnolo 10-speed shifters are known to fail when worn. They're currently available for just a few bucks, but may not be available in a few years. Replacement shifters will probably be available for a while, but with at least a three-digit price tag. I picked up a couple of g-springs and carriers as five-dollar insurance.

For another example, my road bike has a square taper Campagnolo Veloce crankset. Since Campy has migrated all their cranksets to external bearing designs, their square taper bottom brackets are going the way of the dinosaurs. I found a compatible Campy Centaur bottom bracket on clearance for a fraction of its original price, so I scooped it up. When my current bottom bracket eventually dies, I'll just swap in the Campy Centaur BB instead of having to buy a new crankset or 3rd-party replacement.
Right! I am going to have to do some more research it seems on the 6800 shifters. To some extent they are rebuildable and I need to understand it better. I'm thinking it hasn't been out long enough for everyone to start complaining about certain failures.

The 9 speed stuff and those Octalink BBs! I just grabbed a new 105 octalink just to have around for the future. Ultegra Octalinks are already gone except the NOS that pops up on ebay from time to time.
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Old 02-24-15, 11:09 AM
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This thread reminds me: I should pick up a spare 7/8-speed rear DT shifter, now that all of mine are installed on bikes.
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Old 02-24-15, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by hueyhoolihan View Post
once i build my bikes the way i want them, i haven't found much reason to buy anything other than tires, and the occasional tube or chain.
Ride more and/or in less than perfect weather

I've worn out bottom brackets, brake hoods, brake pads, brake return springs, cassettes, chain rings, saddles, and seat posts.

I had a brake track getting somewhat concave before I replaced a rim because I finally bent it after 12-13 years, I had rear derailleur upper and lower pivots getting loose before I moved on to 10 cogs requiring a change (Campagnolo modified the actuation ratio on 10 cog derailleurs like Shimano did 11), and the bearings in my favorite rear hub are no longer perfectly smooth (I switched to training with power via a Powertap).

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 02-24-15 at 11:38 AM.
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Old 02-24-15, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by cale View Post

Edited to add, this sounds horrible and I would never wish it on you, what if your bike was stolen? You probably wouldn't want spare parts then.
I would, because too many more recent components aren't attractive (black alloy, dead-octopus cranks, skeleton brakes, Campagnolo skewers made after 2006).
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Old 02-24-15, 11:48 AM
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IME Ultegra parts are very durable.

My 12 y.o. Ultegra 9-speed brifters have just started rattling on chipseal. That's what happened just before my RH brifter went out on my last set after ~30,000 miles.

So thanks for this thread: I just ordered a set of 3X10 Ultegra brifters. Might be my last chance to buy a new set of Shimano triple brifters. Might be the last set of brifters I'll ever need.
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Old 02-24-15, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
For another example, my road bike has a square taper Campagnolo Veloce crankset. Since Campy has migrated all their cranksets to external bearing designs, their square taper bottom brackets are going the way of the dinosaurs. I found a compatible Campy Centaur bottom bracket on clearance for a fraction of its original price, so I scooped it up. When my current bottom bracket eventually dies, I'll just swap in the Campy Centaur BB instead of having to buy a new crankset or 3rd-party replacement.
I expect that my SKF square taper BB (a splurge, for sure) to literally outlive me, and maybe my kids, too. The Phil BB in two other bikes are probably similar, and quite rebuildable. I should include them all in my Last Will and Testament.

Higher quality Shimano 8-speed cassette cogs are what I collect for the future. I've got an extra set of Sachs New Success brifters, plus a bunch of Campy g-springs. Wish I had extra 8-spd carriers spring carriers now that they're extinct, but if really needed, I could switch to Campy 10-spd to shift my custom 8-speed Shimano cassettes.

I've got an extra Campy Racing T FD, but they don't seem to wear out, either the pivots or the cage, and I always look for better Suntour FD's that work very nicely since Campy Ergo brifters are pretty flexible there. I also have a small collection of my favorite Sachs New Success medium age RD as spares, but those also seem to last forever.
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Old 02-24-15, 11:58 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
Ride more and/or in less than perfect weather

I've worn out bottom brackets, brake hoods, brake pads, brake return springs, cassettes, chain rings, saddles, and seat posts.

I had a brake track getting somewhat concave before I replaced a rim because I finally bent it after 12-13 years, I had rear derailleur upper and lower pivots getting loose before I moved on to 10 cogs requiring a change (Campagnolo modified the actuation ratio on 10 cog derailleurs like Shimano did 11), and the bearings in my favorite rear hub are no longer perfectly smooth (I switched to training with power via a Powertap).
good point .

i ride, per bike, about 1300 miles a year, and it's absolutely the most benign bike riding weather you could imagine. i might as well be, for all the wear and tear it puts on the bike, on rollers in my living room.

Last edited by hueyhoolihan; 02-24-15 at 12:01 PM.
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Old 02-24-15, 12:09 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
I would, because too many more recent components aren't attractive (black alloy, dead-octopus cranks, skeleton brakes, Campagnolo skewers made after 2006).
That works for me. It's not my money.
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