Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

New to wrenching; making some silly mistakes. Share yours?

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

New to wrenching; making some silly mistakes. Share yours?

Old 03-06-15, 11:30 AM
  #26  
tarwheel 
Senior Member
 
tarwheel's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,902

Bikes: Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Soma Saga, De Bernardi SL, Specialized Sequoia

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
My biggest problem over the years has been overtightening bolts -- specifically, seat-post binder bolts. I have snapped more than my fair share of them, once with annoying consequences. I adjusted the height on my saddle during a ride, snapped the bolt, and had to ride 20 miles with the saddle too low.

I haven't snapped a binder bolt in a while, but carry a spare in my seatbag just in case. When adjusting my saddle height now, I count how many turns of the wrench it takes to loosen the binder bolt. Then when retightening the bolt, I turn it the same number of times. Seem to work in absence of using a torque wrench.
tarwheel is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 11:35 AM
  #27  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 9,495

Bikes: '76 Paramount, Salsa Timberjack, Burley Samba, Terra Trike

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1477 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 62 Posts
Originally Posted by Bandrada View Post
I am still uncertain which is the proper direction for the hub stamp. All I know is that both front and rear should be faced the same direction.
Why would this be difficult? You just need to make the front match the rear. Of course this does mean if you have a flip/flop hub that you must flip the front as well.
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 11:38 AM
  #28  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 9,495

Bikes: '76 Paramount, Salsa Timberjack, Burley Samba, Terra Trike

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1477 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 62 Posts
Originally Posted by nfmisso View Post
Lacing up spokes incorrectly - didn't figure out until the third of four groups of spokes that I had started one off, and there would be extreme difficulty in getting the pump chuck on to the valve......had to take it all the way back to the first spoke.
Originally Posted by CroMo Mike View Post
The only recent one I can recall is, after spoking up a wheel, finding the label on the rim facing the wrong side, even though I had put some thought into making it face correctly.
I've been nerving up to try a wheel build, you guys keep scaring me off
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 11:55 AM
  #29  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,019

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4342 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
I've been nerving up to try a wheel build, you guys keep scaring me off
Don't be put off. You can make mistakes, but if you keep your eyes open, can take the wheel apart and putting it together again before tightening the spokes and aligning.

Wheel building involves two skill sets. Methodology, or the ability to connect dots according to instructions. This is easily learned, or can simply be done by carefully following the instructions. Skill/touch, or the ability to see or feel what's happening as you tighten and align. It's possible to build a decent wheel on methodology alone, but skill which comes with some experience makes the process faster and better.

Go to a yard sale or co-op and find a used front wheel in decent shape (rim not bent) you can buy cheap. Take it apart, then find a tutorial and relace it. Once you've relaced and checked the pattern, tighten and align it. Depending on the prior condition, you may not get it perfect, but this practice effort will only cost you a few bucks for the wheel and a spoke wrench. You can use your own fork, and brake caliper as a truing stand.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 12:22 PM
  #30  
Earl Grey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Midwest
Posts: 369

Bikes: '10 Fuji Cross Comp, '12 Brompton S-Type, '14 All City Mr Pink

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tarwheel View Post
Then when retightening the bolt, I turn it the same number of times. Seem to work in absence of using a torque wrench.
Based on my understanding of how bolts work, that approach should be at least as good a torque wrench in terms of accurate return to the original clamping force.
Earl Grey is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 02:32 PM
  #31  
CroMo Mike 
Senior Member
 
CroMo Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 1,240

Bikes: Listed in my signature.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
The right direction is whichever direction you wan it to be. Since it doesn't have any mechanical implications, it's strictly a style statement and your choice. Hub stamp orientation is just one o those things that the OCD folks are trying to make a big deal out of.
I probably will leave it as-is, just sorta frustrating to have that happen since it wasn't my first rodeo. Now, when I was a kid I took a wheel apart and respoked it "for the fun of it." When it went back together, all the spokes were too long. That was an early lesson in the different spoke cross patterns.
__________________
My C&V Bikes:
1972 Bottecchia Professional, 1987 Bottecchia Team C-Record, 1982 Colnago Super,
1995 Bianchi Campione d'Italia, 1995 DeBernardi Thron Super Record
CroMo Mike is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 02:47 PM
  #32  
JerrySTL
Senior Member
 
JerrySTL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Near St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 1,446

Bikes: Giant Defy Advanced, Breezer Doppler Team, Schwinn Twinn Tandem, Windsor Tourist, 1954 JC Higgens

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The fancy teardrop-shaped seat post on my Giant Defy Advanced kept sliding down. So I'd raise it back up and tighten it down with an Allen wrench a little tighter.

I knew what that 5 NM stamped on the seat post collar meant, but ignored it. << This is the silly mistake part.

Finally I heard about Tacx Carbon Prep and how it could help keep carbon fiber pieces from sliding around plus act as an anti-seize compound. I bought some and was going to spread it on the seat post and inside the seat tube. But it was too late. I'd already crushed the seat post pretty bad.

Cost: $200 for a new fancy teardrop seat post and $20 for a torque wrench that would go down to 5 NM.
JerrySTL is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 02:47 PM
  #33  
CroMo Mike 
Senior Member
 
CroMo Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 1,240

Bikes: Listed in my signature.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ooops! Double post - please delete
__________________
My C&V Bikes:
1972 Bottecchia Professional, 1987 Bottecchia Team C-Record, 1982 Colnago Super,
1995 Bianchi Campione d'Italia, 1995 DeBernardi Thron Super Record
CroMo Mike is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 03:30 PM
  #34  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,019

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4342 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by CroMo Mike View Post
I probably will leave it as-is, just sorta frustrating to have that happen since it wasn't my first rodeo. Now, when I was a kid I took a wheel apart and respoked it "for the fun of it." When it went back together, all the spokes were too long. That was an early lesson in the different spoke cross patterns.
This is a new issue made that way by the OCD crowd. BITD nobody cared and we simply laced hubs at random. Then a few started lining up labels, and it was sort of cool. Now it's expected. I used to line up the label with the valve hole so it would read from the top if viewed through the hole. But when folks started making it de rigueur, and every newbie was doing it, it lost any coolness for me. Then my contrary nature cut in and I now build wheels with the hub label exactly opposite the valve hole to show that I could line it up if I wanted to, but don't care.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 04:49 PM
  #35  
Fastfingaz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,326
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
One thing comes to mind when I first started taking front axels apart ,I thought all bearings were in cages, remember taking one apart and all the bearings fell out all over the place , lost some that time,,,,,,
Fastfingaz is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 05:33 PM
  #36  
CroMo Mike 
Senior Member
 
CroMo Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 1,240

Bikes: Listed in my signature.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
This is a new issue made that way by the OCD crowd. BITD nobody cared and we simply laced hubs at random. Then a few started lining up labels, and it was sort of cool. Now it's expected. I used to line up the label with the valve hole so it would read from the top if viewed through the hole. But when folks started making it de rigueur, and every newbie was doing it, it lost any coolness for me. Then my contrary nature cut in and I now build wheels with the hub label exactly opposite the valve hole to show that I could line it up if I wanted to, but don't care.
Now they tell me that when I take a picture of a bike to post it on the forum, both valve stems should be at the top and the chain has to be on the big ring. And drive side only, of course.
__________________
My C&V Bikes:
1972 Bottecchia Professional, 1987 Bottecchia Team C-Record, 1982 Colnago Super,
1995 Bianchi Campione d'Italia, 1995 DeBernardi Thron Super Record
CroMo Mike is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 05:47 PM
  #37  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,019

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4342 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by CroMo Mike View Post
Now they tell me that when I take a picture of a bike to post it on the forum, both valve stems should be at the top and the chain has to be on the big ring. And drive side only, of course.
When I worked for a bike importer and we had to take product photos for catalogs, we attended to these details, not out of a misplaced sense of style o rules, but to make labels or other features most clearly visible. This was well before digital photography, so it was an expensive slow process. Everything was oriented to the camera which was above the bike slightly shooting down. Rim labels were at the bottom, Tire labels usually near the top, cranks oriented so the brand showed out well under the lighting, and likewise everything else. Then lights were aimed so glare or reflections didn't obscure everything, and when all seemed right Polaroids were shot to make sure, before the actual photos were taken.

A constant internal debate was wheel quick releases, because these were the only brand ID for the hubs and were on the left (out of sight in the photo). We tried a few shots with at least the front QR reversed, but they never looked right, and we gave up on that. Besides that would be endless debate about nonsense like seatpost height and stem extension, and whether the pedals should be turned so the toe clips were up, or allowed to hang upside down as they normally would.

Taking studio shots with owners, ad men, art directors and mechanics all in the same room prepared you for a career as a marriage counselor. The only thing was the annual ritual of deciding on color schemes.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 06:33 PM
  #38  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 5,020

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 667 Post(s)
Liked 47 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by CroMo Mike View Post
Now they tell me that when I take a picture of a bike to post it on the forum, both valve stems should be at the top and the chain has to be on the big ring. And drive side only, of course.
And in front of a white garage door.
dedhed is online now  
Old 03-06-15, 06:52 PM
  #39  
Camilo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,537
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 228 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
I've put a pedal on the wrong side of the crank arm. Where do I pick up the prize?
Camilo is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 07:18 PM
  #40  
TCR Rider
Senior Member
 
TCR Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
Posts: 868

Bikes: Pinarello Dogma F8 Giant TCR Advanced 2 Jamis Coda

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
The first time I was replacing the cables and housings for the shifters and brakes I was sure I had covered all the bases. I watched the videos on Park Tool read up on it in Zinn's Road bike maintenance book asked questions on forums, yup I was good to go.
I got through the job but I could not get the rear derailleur dialed in. I made one mistake - I forget to shift down to the biggest gear before installing the cable. One more - I forgot to install the barrell adjuster on the front der. Oh well, live and learn.
TCR Rider is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 07:49 PM
  #41  
Amesja
Cottered Crank
 
Amesja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,493

Bikes: 1954 Raleigh Sports 1974 Raleigh Competition 1969 Raleigh Twenty 1964 Raleigh LTD-3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
This is a new issue made that way by the OCD crowd. BITD nobody cared and we simply laced hubs at random. Then a few started lining up labels, and it was sort of cool. Now it's expected. I used to line up the label with the valve hole so it would read from the top if viewed through the hole. But when folks started making it de rigueur, and every newbie was doing it, it lost any coolness for me. Then my contrary nature cut in and I now build wheels with the hub label exactly opposite the valve hole to show that I could line it up if I wanted to, but don't care.
I always try to line up the label on the rim so it is exactly opposite the valve stem hole.
Amesja is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 08:23 PM
  #42  
Bandrada
Bandolero
 
Bandrada's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Land of Enhancement
Posts: 402

Bikes: ...

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2921 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
This is a new issue made that way by the OCD crowd. BITD nobody cared and we simply laced hubs at random. Then a few started lining up labels, and it was sort of cool. Now it's expected. I used to line up the label with the valve hole so it would read from the top if viewed through the hole. But when folks started making it de rigueur, and every newbie was doing it, it lost any coolness for me. Then my contrary nature cut in and I now build wheels with the hub label exactly opposite the valve hole to show that I could line it up if I wanted to, but don't care.
As long as you have an easy reference to the valve stem, then you're a-ok.
Bandrada is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 08:49 PM
  #43  
CroMo Mike 
Senior Member
 
CroMo Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 1,240

Bikes: Listed in my signature.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
I've put a pedal on the wrong side of the crank arm. Where do I pick up the prize?
Whoa! not so fast. I heard of a guy taking the pedals apart to clean the bearings. He reassembled them with the spindles in the wrong pedals, so the left pedal then had right-hand threads and the right had left-hand threads. Oops!
__________________
My C&V Bikes:
1972 Bottecchia Professional, 1987 Bottecchia Team C-Record, 1982 Colnago Super,
1995 Bianchi Campione d'Italia, 1995 DeBernardi Thron Super Record
CroMo Mike is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 09:40 PM
  #44  
Jiggle
Senior Member
 
Jiggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Somewhere in TX
Posts: 2,269

Bikes: BH, Cervelo, Cube, Canyon

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I fitted cartridge pad holders to some linear pull brakes. The screw that kept the pad from backing out was hitting the inside of the fork and keeping the brakes from opening up wide enough for my 25mm front rim. No problem. I took them off, removed the screw, pulled out the dremel and ground that area flat. Then I drilled 1/16" holes through the holder and pressed in a roll pin. Hit it with some paint. Looked good. Very secure. Repeated on all four brakes.

Then realized the rears didn't need it at all. Oh well, at least the pad is VERY secure!
Jiggle is offline  
Old 03-06-15, 11:52 PM
  #45  
JonnyHK 
Senior Member
 
JonnyHK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: London
Posts: 2,366

Bikes: Baum Romano, Brompton S2, Homemade Bamboo!

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Not so much a mistake, but something I could have done better.

More lubrication when installing - even in areas that you shouldn't need to - and more frequent cleaning.

Drilling out this seized cable ferrule was a Mo-Fo job without a pedestal drill and a vice, but I managed.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
P3070032.jpg (98.2 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg
P3070033.jpg (70.2 KB, 9 views)
JonnyHK is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
pacecar
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals.
18
06-19-13 03:40 PM
ragmar44
Introductions
1
10-10-10 06:41 PM
soderbiker
Classic & Vintage
7
08-22-08 12:54 PM
volball
Introductions
4
06-09-08 05:35 PM
Misbehavin
Road Cycling
7
06-17-07 10:46 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.