Books, Movies, Music & Entertainment Do we really need a description for this forum?

What are you reading right now?

Old 03-26-19, 04:30 PM
  #1601  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8851 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Book 8 of The Expanse came today. It's starting slowly, but I since I've never seen a series that can keep going as well as this has been going, I'll cut some slack.

My favorite character, Chrisjun Avarasala, has died (from old age). As is the author's habit, which is always raising the stakes to a new level of crazy, you know a sh*t storm is on the way. A billion years ago, a race that spanned the galaxy was wiped out by something even nastier. Something that still lives. So of course we're going to go pick a fight with it, them, whatever it is.
late is offline  
Old 03-27-19, 10:45 PM
  #1602  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8851 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by billyjoe44 View Post

Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance, pretty insightful read. Anyone else read this?
2 or 3 times.
I found a bunch in a cutout bin, and started handing them out to everyone I knew. Good book.
late is offline  
Old 04-01-19, 04:20 PM
  #1603  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8851 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by late View Post

Book 8 of The Expanse came today. It's starting slowly, but I since I've never seen a series that can keep going as well as this has been going, I'll cut some slack.

My favorite character, Chrisjun Avarasala, has died (from old age). As is the author's habit, which is always raising the stakes to a new level of crazy, you know a sh*t storm is on the way. A billion years ago, a race that spanned the galaxy was wiped out by something even nastier. Something that still lives. So of course we're going to go pick a fight with it, them, whatever it is.
That didn't take long. The first few books of The Expanse saga are remarkable. The author has a real feel for the interplay of informal power structures with traditional hierarchical structures.

The ending suggests there will be a ninth book, something I hope will happen, preferably soon.
late is offline  
Old 04-03-19, 10:21 AM
  #1604  
bikecrate
Senior Member
 
bikecrate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: LF, APMAT
Posts: 2,237
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Started On Desperate Ground: The Marines at The Reservoir, the Korean War's Greatest Battle by Hampton Sides. So far pretty interesting. Fairly scathing view of Douglas MacArthur and his staff. If I have any criticism of the book it tends towards some purple phrasing.
bikecrate is offline  
Old 04-06-19, 04:05 PM
  #1605  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,746

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 45 Posts
Finished listening to The Border, the third of crime novel trilogy based on police-Mexican drug cartel, by Don Winslow. Most highly recommended, especially after reading the first two books of the trilogy, Power of the Dog, and The Cartel.

Started listening to Burglar on the Prowl, by Lawrence Block. It is one of the few books in the Bernie Rhodenbarr series, that I haven't previously read. Bernie is a NYC bookstore owner who burgles on the side. Like the Hitman series, also by Lawrence Block, it mixes crime with humor with great dialog.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 04-09-19, 12:37 PM
  #1606  
bikecrate
Senior Member
 
bikecrate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: LF, APMAT
Posts: 2,237
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Finished On Desperate Ground: The Marines at The Reservoir, the Korean War's Greatest Battle by Hampton Sides. Great true story. Gen. Smith leads his surrounded men out of the Chosin Reservoir to safety while inflicting huge damage on the Chinese army under the worst weather conditions any American army has had to endure. Probably one of the most underrated battlefield generals.
bikecrate is offline  
Old 04-09-19, 08:27 PM
  #1607  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,746

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 45 Posts
Finished listening to Burglar on the Prowl, by Lawrence Block. Bernie Rhodenbarr is a NYC bookstore owner who burgles on the side. Like the Hitman series, also by Lawrence Block, the burglar series mixes crime with humor with great dialog.

Started listening to A Christmas Far from Home: An Epic Tale of Courage and Survival during the Korean War, by Stanley Weintraub.

It also covers some of the same "Desperate Ground" at the Chosin Reservoir as recently discussed by bikecrate.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 04-12-19, 09:13 AM
  #1608  
bartra228
Junior Member
 
bartra228's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: iowa city
Posts: 5

Bikes: s&m

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I dont like read books.i prefer films
bartra228 is offline  
Old 04-16-19, 10:24 AM
  #1609  
bikecrate
Senior Member
 
bikecrate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: LF, APMAT
Posts: 2,237
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Started The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller. Interesting historical fiction so far. A retelling of The Iliad from the point of view of Patroclus in prose language. You have to take it for granted that there are really Greek gods, centaurs, etc. to get into it.
bikecrate is offline  
Old 04-16-19, 10:37 PM
  #1610  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,746

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 45 Posts
Finished listening to A Christmas Far from Home: An Epic Tale of Courage and Survival during the Korean War, by Stanley Weintraub. Covered familiar story with special emphasis on the failure of leadership by Douglas MacArthur and his lackeys like Ned Almond.

Finished listening to The Last Stand of Fox Company: A True Story of U.S. Marines in Combat, by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin. One week of terrible hardship and courage at the Chosin Reservoir in Nov -Dec 1950. Excellent coverage of this heroic small unit engagement with a vastly superior numerical force.

Started listening to Madame Fourcade's Secret War: The Daring Young Woman Who Led France's Largest Spy Network Against Hitler by Lynne Olson.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 09:31 AM
  #1611  
NoWhammies
Senior Member
 
NoWhammies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 814

Bikes: Argon 18 Gallium, BH G7

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 338 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 23 Posts
Finished God is not Great by Christopher Hitchens. Thoroughly enjoyed reading it.

Next up, Poppet by Mo Hayder. Bring on the creep factor.
NoWhammies is offline  
Old 04-22-19, 02:20 AM
  #1612  
DustyBF
Junior Member
 
DustyBF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Neil Geiman's New Gods. Started it after enjoying the series
DustyBF is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 01:05 PM
  #1613  
atsui
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Currently I prepare for some tests and writing paper on sociology. So I am into book called The protestant ethic and the spirit of capithalism by Max Weber. This book is interesting and I got many useful info for myself. In his work, Max Weber relates the emergence of the capitalist system with the reformation and with the advent of the Protestant denominations within Christianity, with their special relationship to employment and entrepreneurship. As I said before I need to write paper on this topic and I have plan to apply for helping to some service you can see this

Last edited by atsui; 04-25-19 at 01:24 AM.
atsui is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 02:51 PM
  #1614  
Franc Franclin
Junior Member
 
Franc Franclin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 24
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Just starting “Lou Reed: A Life” by Anthony DeCurtis.

At the pace I read books nowadays I should finish by next August!
Franc Franclin is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 09:52 PM
  #1615  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8851 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by atsui View Post

Currently I prepare for some tests and writing paper on sociology. So I am into book called The protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism by Max Weber. This book is interesting and I got many useful info for myself. In his work, Max Weber relates the emergence of the capitalist system with the reformation and with the advent of the Protestant denominations within Christianity, with their special relationship to employment and entrepreneurship. As I said before I need to write paper on this topic and I have plan to apply for helping to some service you can see this
Look at Renaissance Italy. Banking, as we know it, got it's start there. I think they also started the first embassies, which were cooperatives to help ships that got into trouble.

Not knocking Weber, I don't really remember him beyond knowing he was covered in some of my classes. But a little historical context might help.
late is offline  
Old 04-25-19, 06:41 AM
  #1616  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,746

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 45 Posts
Finished listening to Madame Fourcade's Secret War: The Daring Young Woman Who Led France's Largest Spy Network Against Hitler by Lynne Olson. Good book, interesting history of the French Resistance organization responsible for gathering intelligence for the British during WW2. Only a fair reader, the woman tried to add drama to every sentence.

Started listening to Metropolis, the last Bernie Gunther novel written by the recently deceased Phillip Kerr.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 04-26-19, 08:48 AM
  #1617  
Bob Ross
your god hates me
 
Bob Ross's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,861

Bikes: 2018 Cannondale CAADX 105 SE, 2016 Richard Sachs, 2010 Carl Strong, 2006 Cannondale Synapse

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 434 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Bob Ross is offline  
Old 04-26-19, 07:13 PM
  #1618  
KingKong
Junior Member
 
KingKong's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Journey to the Soviet Union by Samantha Smith
KingKong is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 06:55 AM
  #1619  
kellyon
Member
 
kellyon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Howl's moving castle. I really love the film so when I discovered that it's based on a book I had to read it.
kellyon is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 08:29 AM
  #1620  
Stadjer
Senior Member
 
Stadjer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Groningen
Posts: 1,134

Bikes: Gazelle rod brakes, Batavus compact, Peugeot hybrid

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2135 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by late View Post
Look at Renaissance Italy. Banking, as we know it, got it's start there. I think they also started the first embassies, which were cooperatives to help ships that got into trouble.

Not knocking Weber, I don't really remember him beyond knowing he was covered in some of my classes. But a little historical context might help.
It depends on what you believe typifies capitalism, which is still a relevant question. Is it banks or is it the accumulation of money to finance means of production? Certainly the protestants have a special attitude towards work, but together with the rise of protestantism there was shift from the land based feudal economies where people got the land from god together with the monarch who was also put there by god, to a much more trade and crafts based economy.
Stadjer is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 08:45 AM
  #1621  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8851 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by Stadjer View Post

It depends on what you believe typifies capitalism, which is still a relevant question. Is it banks or is it the accumulation of money to finance means of production?
That's a somewhat artificial distinction. You can't have a modern economy without modern economics, and that includes a financial sector.

You are, of course, referring to financialisation, which subverts an economy due to parasitical behavior by the financial sector.

That's best described as a disease. "Successful economies do not let themselves become the playthings of the financial sector" Lester Thurow
late is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 06:11 AM
  #1622  
Stadjer
Senior Member
 
Stadjer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Groningen
Posts: 1,134

Bikes: Gazelle rod brakes, Batavus compact, Peugeot hybrid

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2135 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by late View Post
That's a somewhat artificial distinction. You can't have a modern economy without modern economics, and that includes a financial sector.

You are, of course, referring to financialisation, which subverts an economy due to parasitical behavior by the financial sector.

That's best described as a disease. "Successful economies do not let themselves become the playthings of the financial sector" Lester Thurow
We agree on that, but I believe essential to capitalism is the way it organizes production, through concentration of money for the sake of investing in means of production to raise (worker) productivity. Banks are helpful but things like people bringing lots of money together to take shares in huge enterprises happened to my knowledge first after the reformation and in protestant and calvinist area's, and not in catholic area's within the same jurisdiction. This Weber guy might be on to something.
Stadjer is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 08:06 AM
  #1623  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8851 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by Stadjer View Post

We agree on that, but I believe essential to capitalism is the way it organizes production, through concentration of money for the sake of investing in means of production to raise (worker) productivity. Banks are helpful but things like people bringing lots of money together to take shares in huge enterprises happened to my knowledge first after the reformation and in protestant and calvinist area's, and not in catholic area's within the same jurisdiction. This Weber guy might be on to something.
Italy.

The funny thing about capitalism is that it was about global trade from the very start. In Rennaisance Italy, bankers developed a way to handle international trade.

There's quite a few books about that, but my reference is Braudel's Wheels of Commerce, vol 2 of Civilisation and Capitalism 15th to 18th Century
late is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 09:27 AM
  #1624  
Stadjer
Senior Member
 
Stadjer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Groningen
Posts: 1,134

Bikes: Gazelle rod brakes, Batavus compact, Peugeot hybrid

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2135 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by late View Post
Italy.

The funny thing about capitalism is that it was about global trade from the very start. In Rennaisance Italy, bankers developed a way to handle international trade.

There's quite a few books about that, but my reference is Braudel's Wheels of Commerce, vol 2 of Civilisation and Capitalism 15th to 18th Century
I started in Braudel's Meditterranian last year, but didn't finish it yet. It's a matter of definitions and perspective, appearantly he sees mercantilism as a form of capitalism, you could also argue that it is it's predecessor that the 'free traders' of the protestant North were developping towards a new system that would make a name for itself in the industrial revolution. Italy got marginalized, even in their own backyard sea, and the other southern catholics were in decline too. Most likely the more refined banking in the North and the stock enterprises had a lot to do with that. In a dangerous business as shipping, spreading your money over several vessels was much more attractive than putting it into one ship, with or without the services of a bank.
Stadjer is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 12:20 PM
  #1625  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,547
Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8851 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by Stadjer View Post

I started in Braudel's Meditterranian last year, but didn't finish it yet. It's a matter of definitions and perspective, appearantly he sees mercantilism as a form of capitalism, you could also argue that it is it's predecessor that the 'free traders' of the protestant North were developing towards a new system that would make a name for itself in the industrial revolution. Italy got marginalized, even in their own backyard sea, and the other southern catholics were in decline too. Most likely the more refined banking in the North and the stock enterprises had a lot to do with that. In a dangerous business as shipping, spreading your money over several vessels was much more attractive than putting it into one ship, with or without the services of a bank.
This was an evolution of sorts. Once lenders knew how to handle risk, they could make all sorts of loans they couldn't before. In Medieval towns, the church was the center of town. Once markets arrived, they became the center of town.

I'm not sure, but I think the migration north of capitalism had as much to do with Catholic taxes as it did with any refinements in financial instruments.

I'm picking this up manana, looks like the author took guns, germs and steel, and worked on the premise in England.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/20...a-satia-review

Last edited by late; 04-30-19 at 12:25 PM.
late is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.