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Rocky Mountain Hammer Race

Old 05-02-15, 11:46 AM
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LoriRose
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Rocky Mountain Hammer Race

Unfortunately I don't know the year but if anyone recognizes it....

$250 a good deal?
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Old 05-02-15, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by LoriRose View Post
Unfortunately I don't know the year but if anyone recognizes it....

$250 a good deal?
Don't know the year but $250 is too high by half.
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Old 05-02-15, 07:21 PM
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Looks to be a 1999 based on the color and Marzocchi Bomber Z-4 fork 1999 Rocky Mountain Hammer Race - BikePedia

They replaced the seat post and saddle with a cheap suspension post. Ask to see if the owner still has the originals around. If they don't, use that as a bargaining tool. Look to see if any other parts have been replaced (goodies like the Race Face cranks, ect).

$1125 originally so I think the $250 price is OK if you're looking for a good steel hardtail (with a Reynolds decal). Expecting to pay $125 is unrealistic.
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Old 05-02-15, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Clang View Post
Looks to be a 1999 based on the color and Marzocchi Bomber Z-4 fork 1999 Rocky Mountain Hammer Race - BikePedia

They replaced the seat post and saddle with a cheap suspension post. Ask to see if the owner still has the originals around. If they don't, use that as a bargaining tool. Look to see if any other parts have been replaced (goodies like the Race Face cranks, ect).

$1125 originally so I think the $250 price is OK if you're looking for a good steel hardtail (with a Reynolds decal). Expecting to pay $125 is unrealistic.
Thanks Clang. I'm new to this but looking to buy a solid and reliable used bike. Seems that the Rocky Mountain Hammer Race has a really good reputation, and the bike is in my price range, and it is also my size. I'm looking to buy ASAP and this has been the best option to come up so far so even if it's not the best deal I'm ok with that. However, if it is fact only worth around $125 I'd be a fool to purchase it. The following link led me to believe it's a good deal.

1999 Rocky Mountain Hammer Race - New and Used Bike Value

Is this a reliable source?

Thanks!
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Old 05-02-15, 08:56 PM
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I think the main problem with bicyclebluebook is that its quoted price is based more on depreciation rather than local market, and the condition ranking of the bike is rather nebulous. You'll need better and more photos to gauge condition online. Your best bet is to meet with them and ride it. If everything checks out: wheels true, shifts OK, fork operative, I don't think you're getting burned at $250 (but hey, like any craigslist bike, shoot for $200). Good luck!
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Old 05-02-15, 09:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Clang View Post
I think the main problem with bicyclebluebook is that its quoted price is based more on depreciation rather than local market, and the condition ranking of the bike is rather nebulous. You'll need better and more photos to gauge condition online. Your best bet is to meet with them and ride it. If everything checks out: wheels true, shifts OK, fork operative, I don't think you're getting burned at $250 (but hey, like any craigslist bike, shoot for $200). Good luck!
I'm going to check it out tomorrow. Unless there is some major issue with the bike I will probably buy it. I'm pretty darned excited about it and hope to be cruising soon! Thanks again!
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Old 05-02-15, 09:27 PM
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Simply the fact that it doesn't have disc makes $250 a bit high. I wouldn't go higher than $200 myself.

If you're looking to just get into mountain biking, I'd highly recommend saving for a ~$600 shop bike. Classic road bikes have more interest than classic mountain bikes for a reason.
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Old 05-02-15, 10:18 PM
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Originally Posted by IcySmooth52 View Post
Simply the fact that it doesn't have disc makes $250 a bit high. I wouldn't go higher than $200 myself.

If you're looking to just get into mountain biking, I'd highly recommend saving for a ~$600 shop bike. Classic road bikes have more interest than classic mountain bikes for a reason.
Thanks for the feeback IcySmooth. I am looking for a bike for commuting (with tons of potholes to negotiate) and to get my feet wet with mountain biking. Unfortunately for the moment ~$600 is not in my budget and I need something asap. I also have no idea how to haggle! But you have given me some food for thought. I will not lose sleep by overpaying by $50, but I would lose sleep dropping $600 on a bike for the purpose of getting me started. Is my reasoning sound or am I about to make a bad investment? I really do appreciate the feedback! So glad I found this forum!
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Old 05-02-15, 10:27 PM
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You never said what kind of riding they planned on doing. This bike already has slicks on it so I assumed you wanted a solid, general purpose bike. Ride it around town as is. Buy a pair of knobbies and ride some singletrack. Don't worry about 26" wheels and rim brakes (though you might get some odd looks on the trail). You'll do fine. I'm glad you're excited and I hope the check-out goes well.

Plenty of people on the forums ride mountain bikes that are even older than 1999. Fully rigid steel bikes with cantis or roller-cams or U-brakes. We manage :]
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Old 05-02-15, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by LoriRose View Post
I am looking for a bike for commuting (with tons of potholes to negotiate) and to get my feet wet with mountain biking.
With that statement, I think this would be a good bike then. It even has slicks in the photo for a quicker commute. This bike can ride trails, so you can get your feet wet with mountain biking, but if you want to be a mountain biker and keep up with others on the trail, you'll need a bit more.

Save up from your job you commute to and get something like this:
KONA BIKES | 2015 BIKES | TRAIL 27.5" HT | FIRE MOUNTAIN
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Old 05-02-15, 10:36 PM
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So what if it doesn't have disc brakes! That's a sweet frame! Rocky Mountain bikes had some of the most precisely built frames of any of the mass production bike companies. If the fork is leaking or has noticeable play where the stanchions enter into the lowers then it means you'll need a new fork unless someone can rebuild it for you. So, I'd say, if the fork is in good order, $250 seems about right unless there is some other glaring issue of course... If the fork is bad, I'd say $175 would be fair. When you look at the bike make sure to look at the rims...spin them and check for dents along the edge or severe wear along the brake surface. By severe wear, I mean slightly concaved..... The rim's brake surface might be rough but it should be flat. You may also want to look for anything that appears as a hairline crack on or near the welds, especially just under the downtube where it meets the headtube, and around the BB/seatstay junction.
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Old 05-02-15, 10:43 PM
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You guys are awesome. Thank you so much. I envision using this bike to commute and try out some trails etc. and then eventually moving on and up with something more expensive and appropriate for some rougher terrain. In my younger days (I'm not so young anymore!) you couldn't get me off my bike - even if it was a crappy big box store type - and I abandoned my love for riding due to being intimidated by riding around in the big city. I am now in a bike-friendly city with lots of bike paths and an actual mountain (!) and am so excited to get back out there.
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Old 05-02-15, 10:59 PM
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About the 26" wheels: If you are small, the 26" diameter wheels may just be the best size for you. The whole bike industry on the MTB end is making a push toward bigger wheels like 29" and 27.5". When you are good and ready too fork out $600 and up, then you should try the other wheel sizes and see if they're really for you, but until then don't worry about it. Same with the brakes....Disc brakes are way overrated unless you frequently ride in sloppy muck, or spend the majority of your bike rides going down hill. Otherwise V brakes, cover everything VERY well.
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Old 05-02-15, 11:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Wolf Dust View Post
About the 26" wheels: If you are small, the 26" diameter wheels may just be the best size for you. The whole bike industry on the MTB end is making a push toward bigger wheels like 29" and 27.5". When you are good and ready too fork out $600 and up, then you should try the other wheel sizes and see if they're really for you, but until then don't worry about it. Same with the brakes....Disc brakes are way overrated unless you frequently ride in sloppy muck, or spend the majority of your bike rides going down hill. Otherwise V brakes, cover everything VERY well.
I'm 5'8 (female) with long limbs. Like I said this is all really new to me but I'm glad you mentioned downhill because this is something I am really interested in. I have a lot of learning ahead of me, and a lot of research - and, of course, a lot of riding. Can you tell me what difference wheel size makes?
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Old 05-02-15, 11:45 PM
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Originally Posted by LoriRose View Post
I'm 5'8 (female) with long limbs. Like I said this is all really new to me but I'm glad you mentioned downhill because this is something I am really interested in. I have a lot of learning ahead of me, and a lot of research - and, of course, a lot of riding. Can you tell me what difference wheel size makes?
Wheel size is a mixed bag. Some of the reasons the industry is switching to the larger wheels makes a lot of sense, whereas other reasons seem to border more on opinion and riding preference. Here are some general facts about wheel size: Smaller wheels are easier to accelerate and are generally stronger and lighter than larger wheels of the same quality. Bigger wheels roll over obsticals easier than the smaller ones do and they carry their momentum longer. Each has its pros and cons. One of the major reasons the industry is pushing the 27.5" wheel is because the smaller than 29" size allows bike manufacturers more leeway in their full suspension designs since the 29" wheel's large size can pose geometry and clearance issues with FS designs. Once the industry got the masses to swallow the 29er pill it's pretty hard for them to go back to saying that 26" is actually better for many full suspension designs, so instead they create the 27.5" pill. It's just the way the kooky bike industry does things. Most simply put, and these are according to common views, the 29" wheel is better for typical cross country riding/racing, whereas the 26" and 27.5" are more geared toward all mountain and downhill, however the 27.5" wheel seems to be lending itself to become the new do it all wheel size. You will find a lot of varying views and assertations on wheel size. You should know this: 29" is the exact same wheel diameter as 700c, and 27.5" is the exact same as 650b, whereas 26" is just 26". Hope all that jargon's not too confusing!
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Old 05-03-15, 07:21 AM
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A second opinion on mountain bike wheels:

I work in the industry, and there's more science in marketing wheel sizes than designing them right now. But I ride with a few friends sometimes when on the trials, one has 26", another 27.5", and I have 29". All hardtails. The straighter it goes, I'm fastest, even when there's TONS of roots and rocks. (I've even passed ATVs) But the 'swervier' it gets, the smaller the wheel is likely to win. They can simply handle sharp turns better and accelerate after them.
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Old 05-03-15, 02:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Clang View Post
Looks to be a 1999 based on the color and Marzocchi Bomber Z-4 fork 1999 Rocky Mountain Hammer Race - BikePedia

They replaced the seat post and saddle with a cheap suspension post. Ask to see if the owner still has the originals around. If they don't, use that as a bargaining tool. Look to see if any other parts have been replaced (goodies like the Race Face cranks, ect).

$1125 originally so I think the $250 price is OK if you're looking for a good steel hardtail (with a Reynolds decal). Expecting to pay $125 is unrealistic.
So I bought the bike!! I took your advice and checked out all the components. He had replaced the seat because it was stolen, the shifters because they were malfunctioning (to Shimano Deore somthing or other) and the crank set (?) had also been replaced with Shimano Deore Mega LX Drive FC-m570. Now I had NO IDEA if this was a good or bad thing but since you mentioned the Race Face cranks as being a "goodie" I suspected it was a downgrade by the original owner before he sold off the bike because the current owner was unaware of this. I looked so knowledgeable when I pointed it out!! Due to this I was able to talk him down to $200. I took the bike for a spin and it was great - suspension fork in full working order. So I still don't know if I got a good deal but I'd like to think so! In any case, you saved me $50! Considering the downgrade (I googled the shimano deore crankset when I got home and confirmed my suspicions), should I be worried? Should I replace it with something better? Or wait and see how it serves me?
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Old 05-03-15, 04:07 PM
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Shimano's top of the line components for MTB are called XTR, followed by XT, followed by LX, and then Deore. There are several other levels under those. The LX cranks are at the bottom level of "high end", as are the Deore shifters....all good stuff.
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Old 05-03-15, 04:19 PM
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I would suggest taking the bike to a local bike shop and asking if they would check to see if the chain, chainrings, and cogs look good enough for another season of riding and when they think you should replace them. If you're willing to spend around another $50 you might consider asking the bike shop to schedule you in for a tune up. That would give a mechanic the opportunity to look into the bike more thoroughly and adjust anything, such as hubs, that could be a bit too loose or too tight. Just let them know that your main concern is that the bike is safe and properly adjusted.
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Old 05-03-15, 04:45 PM
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Thanks Wolf Dust. Was at the bike shop today and will be scheduling a tune-up soon but they are booked until the 22nd! 'Tis the season up here in Montreal!
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Old 05-03-15, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by LoriRose View Post
Thanks Wolf Dust. Was at the bike shop today and will be scheduling a tune-up soon but they are booked until the 22nd! 'Tis the season up here in Montreal!
Well, it's a bummer to have to wait that long, especially when it's a brand new bike for you, but it was the proper thing to do. I'm happy for you in finding a good bike and hope you really enjoy riding around in Montreal...BTW, were you aware that Rocky Mountain is a Canadian company? Have fun!
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Old 05-03-15, 08:04 PM
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I'm glad you were able to talk them down a bit and come away with the bike! Knowledge makes for a good bargaining tool. Maybe once you get your bike to where you want it you can post pictures in the vintage mountain bike thread: http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...ain-bikes.html
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Old 05-03-15, 10:49 PM
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Thanks again guys! I'm super happy with my (Canadian made) purchase!
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Old 05-23-15, 10:53 AM
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*Update* Great news guys! Just picked her up from her tune-up and she's a winner! No problems, nothing needs replacing, good components and in overall great shape. And the first thing the LBS owner said was "un beau velo!" This is going to be a long and beautiful relationship. Thanks again everyone for all your help!
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Old 05-26-15, 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by LoriRose View Post
*Update* Great news guys! Just picked her up from her tune-up and she's a winner! No problems, nothing needs replacing, good components and in overall great shape. And the first thing the LBS owner said was "un beau velo!" This is going to be a long and beautiful relationship. Thanks again everyone for all your help!
Good to hear! What did you name her, and what does un beau velo mean?
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