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Schwinn Moab 3

Old 05-07-15, 06:46 AM
  #1  
Buggin02
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Schwinn Moab 3

Okay, the Doctor says I have two choices, 1) get of the couch and start exercising or 2)get ready to start taking medication for diabetes. I decided to jump on the option 1.
I have not been on a bicycle for over 20 years but ran across a Schwinn Moab 3. I think it is a 2000 model year(because fo the Green/White color combo) and it looks brand new. It even still has a few of the nubbies on the tires. I gave $170.00 for it.
I will only be riding on the roads gravel & paved. No off-roading unless I am on a path. I will also be riding with my grandkids.
So my questions for you are:
1) Did I pay to much?
2) Is this a good bike?
3) Should I have bought something else for my intended uses?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 05-07-15, 07:07 AM
  #2  
Beach Comber
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I know little to nothing about that bike, so I will defer on questions 1 and 2. Other than to say if your goal is to get healthier and enjoy time with the grands, seems like $170 is money well spent!

Since I was recently in the same boat, I'll offer some suggestions in hopes that you'll avoid the mistakes I made. First and foremost, spend the extra $100 and get yourself professionally fitted for the bike. You can read all the do-it-yourself articles and books, but nothing beats a trained eye watching you while you pedal. I went the DIY path years ago and ended up with some very sore joints seem to never heal when you are on the wrong side of 50.

Second, unless you are really familiar with bike mechanics, take the bike to a good bike shop for thorough inspection and tune-up. You'll find lots of shiny clean bikes on craigslist. Its what you can't see that could cause an unpleasant experience while riding. Besides, as you get more and more back in shape, you'll likely outgrow the bike and want something else. A good local bike shop can guide you through the process. There are probably two or three shops in your area - visit them all and talk to them. Tell them you aren't interested in buying today, you just bought a used bike, and your goals. The good ones will still treat you like gold.

Last, and I can't emphasize this enough especially if you are 50+ - STRETCH before riding. You can find plenty of sites online that show which stretches are best for cycling. Your arms and legs will thank you.

BTW, there is a 50+ forum here that I found to have a bunch of good info for those of us getting back into the saddle at 50.

Good Luck and Enjoy!!
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Old 05-07-15, 07:56 AM
  #3  
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Did you pay too much? Very likely, as it sounds like you knew nothing about bike values when you bought it. I would not sweat it either way, if you paid too much, maybe you overpaid by $50. Small price to get healthy.

The thing about most used bikes is if you overpay, its not like you are spending life altering money. Overpay for a car or a house, and the consequences can be much more serious.

The real question is does it fit? Even a great deal on a bike that does not fit is not a great deal. Endless information on the web on bike sizing.

Usually MTBs like this one have far too aggressive knobby tires. Unless you are going to go way off pavement, these tires just make the bike noisier, heavier, and less efficient. Smoother and narrower tires are the answer.

Realize Schwinn in 2000 is a totally different company than 20 years ago. First, Schwinn stopped all manufacturing in 1989/1990 period. So after that, they did not make any bikes (other than Waterford Paramounts). Also, Schwinn went bankrupt TWICE in the 1990s, so the old Schwinn people remember is long gone. Since that time, IMHO, Schwinn ruined their brand name by hooking up with Target and Walmart. So a lot of crap has a Schwinn tag on it. The Moab 3 is not in the crap category, so good news there.

Last edited by wrk101; 05-07-15 at 07:59 AM.
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Old 05-07-15, 08:09 AM
  #4  
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Hard to tell without photos of the bike and description of your height and weight.
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Old 05-07-15, 08:19 AM
  #5  
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1) If you will actually ride the bike (it fits and is reasonably comfy), then it's a good price. $170 doesn't buy you much bike, new.

2) It's OK. It was a mid-level bike 15 years ago. As long as it's basically un-ridden (as you describe), then it should perform just fine. It has an OK frame and decent components.
The biggest concerns are:
-- lubrication. It could use new grease in the hubs, bottom bracket (crank bearings), and headset. And lube for the chain.
-- tires & tubes. Rubber gets dry and cracks as it gets old.
-- shock fork. The seals on shocks go bad over time. If yours still dampens and then springs back (and isn't leaking), then you're ok. The Judy was a decent shock but they get old like all shocks.

3) Maybe. Mountain bikes are built tough, and are versatile. They fit the wider tires you want for gravel (and if you're heavy).
But you don't need the aggressive, knobby tires. Keep an eye out for 26 x 2" tires with a less knobby tread, they'll roll easier on the road but still do fine on gravel. But if you do have the 2000 Moab 3, those red/black Fire tires are pretty sweet.
You don't need the shock fork for road riding, so that is a bit of overkill. But it doesn't hurt anything except the weight.

This bike should do you fine for now (if it fits). I recommend you ride this one for a while, and then upgrade once you're more used to cycling and know what kind of riding you want to do. A hybrid, cross, or touring bike may be better for you in the long run, since you're not riding MTB trails and obstacles.

On fit: I don't know that you have to spend money to get a good fit. There are lots of advice videos on the internet that you can look at for free. But a good fit is important, to maximize comfort and minimize injury.

A good tune-up would help this bike. My shop does them for $75, but you should also specify that you also want the hubs and bottom bracket greased (may cost a bit extra). Or, learn it yourself! Park tools website has instructional videos for all basic maintenance. Bikes are simple machines, and yours (being older) is simpler than most, and replacement parts are cheap.

You didn't spend a fortune, and this bike is capable (but not ridiculously overbuilt) for road, path, and gravel. If it fits and works fine, it sounds like you did ok.
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Old 05-08-15, 02:51 PM
  #6  
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Thanks for the input everyone. After some research(that should have been done before hand) it looks like this bike retailed for around $600 when it ws new, but who pays MSRP?? Not me. A sort spin down the driveway last night tells me it definitely needs to be fitted.
It does still have "those red/black Fire tires are pretty sweet. "
None of the rubber looks old and its not showing any cracking.
The fork shows no signs of leaking and it still works.
I'll look into lgetting every thing greased/lubed.
It has a 19 logo on the upright for the seat post. maybe that is some kind of frame designator? I can stand flat-footed on level ground and just barely clear the top tube. If I get into an uneven terrain situation, and have to step off, I'll have to remember to lean to one side or the family jewels may be in trouble.
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Old 05-08-15, 03:38 PM
  #7  
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I found a similar vintage late 90s vintage Moab 1 I bought for my son last year for $200, but that was from a local bike shop, and the seller replaced worn parts like the chain, cassette, and right shifter. Even swapped out the stem for a shorter one that fit my son better. Were I buying from a private seller and I might have offered a little less. So in a nutshell, at $170, you did alright. Schwinn in those days sold better bikes than Schwinn today.

As for the third question, I am not a huge fan of mountain bikes with suspension forks for mostly road use. I bought the Moab for my son because he wanted a bike for riding single track. Even though he loves his mountain bike, he rides a hybrid when he rides on the roads. If you want to keep your Moab and adapt it to road riding, I would recommend switching out the knobby tires in favor of slicks and swap out the heavy suspension fork (which you might want to do anyway) for a suspension corrected solid fork. All that costs money and the bike will still be slow and heavy, so up to you if you want to do that or just go get yourself a lighter more modern hybrid like the Trek FX 7.2, the Giant Escape 3, Jamis Coda Sport, Specialized Sirrus, or the Kona Dew.

Last edited by MRT2; 05-08-15 at 03:45 PM.
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Old 05-08-15, 03:57 PM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by Tim_Iowa View Post
1) If you will actually ride the bike (it fits and is reasonably comfy), then it's a good price. $170 doesn't buy you much bike, new.

2) It's OK. It was a mid-level bike 15 years ago. As long as it's basically un-ridden (as you describe), then it should perform just fine. It has an OK frame and decent components.
The biggest concerns are:
-- lubrication. It could use new grease in the hubs, bottom bracket (crank bearings), and headset. And lube for the chain.
-- tires & tubes. Rubber gets dry and cracks as it gets old.
-- shock fork. The seals on shocks go bad over time. If yours still dampens and then springs back (and isn't leaking), then you're ok. The Judy was a decent shock but they get old like all shocks.

3) Maybe. Mountain bikes are built tough, and are versatile. They fit the wider tires you want for gravel (and if you're heavy).
But you don't need the aggressive, knobby tires. Keep an eye out for 26 x 2" tires with a less knobby tread, they'll roll easier on the road but still do fine on gravel. But if you do have the 2000 Moab 3, those red/black Fire tires are pretty sweet.
You don't need the shock fork for road riding, so that is a bit of overkill. But it doesn't hurt anything except the weight.

This bike should do you fine for now (if it fits). I recommend you ride this one for a while, and then upgrade once you're more used to cycling and know what kind of riding you want to do. A hybrid, cross, or touring bike may be better for you in the long run, since you're not riding MTB trails and obstacles.

On fit: I don't know that you have to spend money to get a good fit. There are lots of advice videos on the internet that you can look at for free. But a good fit is important, to maximize comfort and minimize injury.

A good tune-up would help this bike. My shop does them for $75, but you should also specify that you also want the hubs and bottom bracket greased (may cost a bit extra). Or, learn it yourself! Park tools website has instructional videos for all basic maintenance. Bikes are simple machines, and yours (being older) is simpler than most, and replacement parts are cheap.

You didn't spend a fortune, and this bike is capable (but not ridiculously overbuilt) for road, path, and gravel. If it fits and works fine, it sounds like you did ok.
Well, those old suspension forks especially do tend bob up and down as you ride, which is both annoying and fatiguing.
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Old 05-11-15, 01:14 PM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by Buggin02 View Post
A sort spin down the driveway last night tells me it definitely needs to be fitted.
It has a 19 logo on the upright for the seat post. maybe that is some kind of frame designator? I can stand flat-footed on level ground and just barely clear the top tube. If I get into an uneven terrain situation, and have to step off, I'll have to remember to lean to one side or the family jewels may be in trouble.
The "19" on the seat tube is probably the frame size (19 inches), which would make it a size large. Based on your description, it's too big for you.

Look for a bike with more standover room; you should have at least two inches of jewelry space.

The nice thing about buying used is that you can probably sell it for what you paid. Make sure to include the frame size in the ad! No matter how much bike you get for little cash, it's never a good deal if it doesn't fit.

Now that you know a bit more about researching bikes online, you can make a better-informed decision with the next bike.

I used bikepedia.com to find the info on your bike; they have info on most bikes from 1993-present. Tom Findley has a great database of Schwinn/Paramount catalogs as well.

26" mountain bikes are good bargains now, you can usually find high-end bikes for around $200, and they can be good "cruisin around town" bikes.

My favorites are the earlier ones (late 80s to early 90s) that don't have shock forks. Old shocks are heavy and usually are worn out. I'd rather have a rigid fork that I don't need to mess with. If I want shocks, I buy a newer bike.
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