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SELL AS IS OR FIX Pt II - GT TIMBERLINE

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SELL AS IS OR FIX Pt II - GT TIMBERLINE

Old 11-17-15, 11:03 PM
  #1  
miamibeachcg
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SELL AS IS OR FIX Pt II - GT TIMBERLINE

Here is another I've had sitting around & finally got to it - now I have to decide what to do with it; fix it with cables & inner tubes or just sell the frame? I never thought much of it because it had 'Made in Taiwan' in it, but in last couple of days since I pulled it out I've gotten a lot of comments & questions on it! Is it worth fixing to resell or let her go as is?

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Old 11-17-15, 11:44 PM
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Originally Posted by miamibeachcg View Post
Here is another I've had sitting around & finally got to it - now I have to decide what to do with it; fix it with cables & inner tubes or just sell the frame?
It looks to be complete, so if I was in your shoes, I'd probably slap some new cables & housing on it, lube it, clean it, and put air in the tires. Assuming there's nothing mechanically wrong with it, it's just a few bucks and some elbow grease away from being a decent rider.

Originally Posted by miamibeachcg View Post
I never thought much of it because it had 'Made in Taiwan' in it...
When it comes to bikes made in the past few decades, there's no shame in being made in Taiwan. Taiwan is home to some very high-quality manufacturers. If you head to your local bike shop and drop a few grand (or more) on a Giant Propel, it's made in Taiwan. With a few exceptions for brands' flagship models, if you've bought a bike from Bianchi, BMC, Cannondale, Cervelo, Felt, Jamis, Scott, Specialized, Trek, or most of the "big names" in the past few decades, there's a good chance it was made in Taiwan.

Originally Posted by miamibeachcg View Post
I've gotten a lot of comments & questions on it!
It's not a particularly high end bike or in pristine condition, but it'll make a good rider and those "triple triangle" GT frames look pretty cool.
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Old 11-18-15, 12:10 AM
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Why are these late model mtb's winding up in the C&V forum? --- OP--- Geez dude -- its a complete bike, and mid level at best componentry wise -- it will save you a ton of aggravation to get it shifting right and rolling and selling as is vs trying to part it out.

As a complete - its a decent bike, -- as a frameset plus parts, its a junker

Very very few people actually wake up and say "I want to buy a 1994 GT Timberline frameset for a dream bike build"

The Zaskar, Xizang , and the early Avalanche and Karakoram framesets are another story
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Old 11-18-15, 05:24 AM
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It looks to me like an early to mid 90's bike. We don't have a hard and fast rule about how old a bike must be to talk about here in C&V. Overhaul and sell it to someone.

Moving from C&V to C&V Appraisals.
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Old 11-18-15, 05:57 AM
  #5  
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No real value to the parts as a part out.
Put some road slicks on it, 26 x 1.5, add a rack, convert it to a commuter. No need/appeal for a mtb in SF.
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Old 11-18-15, 06:07 AM
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Originally Posted by DMC707 View Post
The Zaskar, Xizang , and the early Avalanche and Karakoram framesets are another story
You caught my interest with this. Are you implying these 4 framesets are more desirable or less desirable? Curious as I own a complete 1989 Karakoram I bought new 26 years ago. Gray splatter paint and Deore shifting, it was one of the better looking mountain bikes in its day. Not a very competitive bike though. Too heavy and not enough rear tire clearance for anything over. 1.95.

Ive relegated mine to city bike duty and haven't washed the sweat, mud and grime from it in 10 years. The bottom bracket paint is probably toast under the layer of gak.
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Old 11-18-15, 07:04 AM
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My GT Timberline was a nice enough mountain bicycle, sporting a touch more character than many of its competitors(my opinion)...





The one presented in the original post is not in great shape, hence worth not all that much, as a complete bicycle, unless riding, rather than selling, is the intent. If parting out becomes the choice and the components are in good condition, then the value would increase dramatically, but the parts must be in good shape.

This one, rebuilt sold for $70.00 and it was fully checked, lubricated and tuned up...

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Old 11-18-15, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by plonz View Post
You caught my interest with this. Are you implying these 4 framesets are more desirable or less desirable? Curious as I own a complete 1989 Karakoram I bought new 26 years ago. Gray splatter paint and Deore shifting, it was one of the better looking mountain bikes in its day. Not a very competitive bike though. Too heavy and not enough rear tire clearance for anything over. 1.95.

Ive relegated mine to city bike duty and haven't washed the sweat, mud and grime from it in 10 years. The bottom bracket paint is probably toast under the layer of gak.
those were the 4 high end GT bikes of that era with the Karakoram being the cheapest, but still a race worthy machine. I had thought the Karak and Avalanche frame were the same, the difference being the Karak used the Deore DX/LX build kit opposed to a Deore XT or Xc Pro suntour build on the Avalanche

All GT frames were heavy for their material due to their reliance on the triple triangle frame design. As far as being competitive, the GT teams of the early 90's seemed to do fine. Granted, the Xizang and Zaskar were not heavy frames, but they were heavy compared to an equivalent Litespeed or Merlin - again due to frame design and build philosophy
As well, owing to GT's bmx roots, they wanted a bike that would hold up if the rider hucked it a bit

these bikes were designed to be raced on NORBA style trails that were popular in the era, thus anything more than a 1.95 tire was a waste anyway, especially for the rear- (again owing to the BMX inspired philosophy of using a narrower more responsive tire in the back and a fatter oneon the front)

they are neat bikes- and unique. Except for the titanium Xizang, "neat and unique" doesn't necessarily mean they are worth a fortune, but The upper end GT's were nice bikes and worthy of keeping rolling -
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Old 11-18-15, 11:05 AM
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Rules I live by for buying vintage Mountain Bikes:

1. Suspension fork - avoid
2. Toothpaste frame welding - avoid
3. Components NOT Shimano Deore, STX or Deerhead - avoid
4. Not a Trek, Specialized, Miyata, Cannondale, PDG Schwinn, or Barracuda - probably avoid.
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Old 11-18-15, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by oddjob2 View Post
Rules I live by for buying vintage Mountain Bikes:

1. Suspension fork - avoid
2. Toothpaste frame welding - avoid
3. Components NOT Shimano Deore, STX or Deerhead - avoid
4. Not a Trek, Specialized, Miyata, Cannondale, PDG Schwinn, or Barracuda - probably avoid.

I agree completely on #1 , though my brother in law manages to refurbish suspension fork mtbs and sell them for a profit without a ton of work. I don’t go near a suspension fork bike and wouldn’t consider one unless it was high end.

I love the welding description! I have always called it icing. I don’t understand the appeal- its all over current road bikes and looks absolutely terrible. Smooth that out!

As for 3 and 4- I have recently started buying up late 80s and early 90s rigid mtbs to refurbish and its gone well. Univega, Schwinn, and Specialized, and Trek- all with Altus/Alivio/Acera components. Each of them were in good mechanical condition so they needed an overhaul and cables/housing replaced. Two needed new grips($8) and three needed new tires. I got some GEAX tires from nashbar for $27 per pair which I have on one of my bikes and they ride well.
Bought each for $40, put $10 in new cables and housing on each, $16 for new grips on two, and $81 for new tires on three. That’s $300 total invested. I finished 2 and sold them last month for $130 and $120. The remaning 2 will sell for $100 each(because of time of year), once they are finished.
So I will make $150 for redoing the 4 bikes. Hardly raking in the money, but they will be 4 easy refurbs and take less time to complete than many others I have done. Plus, I am not in this only for the business, it’s enjoyment too, so the lower profits are ok by me every now and then.
I bought these over the last couple months because road bikes that I would buy to refurbish are friggin scarce! Something to keep me busy is better than nothing.


I do agree with your overall point when it comes to MTBs- the margin is thin and what you do helps maximize that thin margin. It’s a good approach.
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Old 11-18-15, 05:38 PM
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Originally Posted by DMC707 View Post
those were the 4 high end GT bikes of that era with the Karakoram being the cheapest, but still a race worthy machine. I had thought the Karak and Avalanche frame were the same, the difference being the Karak used the Deore DX/LX build kit opposed to a Deore XT or Xc Pro suntour build on the Avalanche

All GT frames were heavy for their material due to their reliance on the triple triangle frame design. As far as being competitive, the GT teams of the early 90's seemed to do fine. Granted, the Xizang and Zaskar were not heavy frames, but they were heavy compared to an equivalent Litespeed or Merlin - again due to frame design and build philosophy
As well, owing to GT's bmx roots, they wanted a bike that would hold up if the rider hucked it a bit

these bikes were designed to be raced on NORBA style trails that were popular in the era, thus anything more than a 1.95 tire was a waste anyway, especially for the rear- (again owing to the BMX inspired philosophy of using a narrower more responsive tire in the back and a fatter oneon the front)

they are neat bikes- and unique. Except for the titanium Xizang, "neat and unique" doesn't necessarily mean they are worth a fortune, but The upper end GT's were nice bikes and worthy of keeping rolling -
I really enjoy your thoughts on these old GTs and I think we view them pretty similarly. My Karakoram is equipped with Moutain LX shifting and cheaper Exage cantilevers. The rear tire clearance was a major stopper (literally) when doing any kind of mud. The frame, though heavier, was incredibly stiff and strong. We would do stupid young people things like mountain bike tractor pulls loading up logs on a pallete and dragging to a target. The GT was the bike of choice as it never flexed, bent or broke under big torque. Silly kids.
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Old 11-18-15, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by plonz View Post
I really enjoy your thoughts on these old GTs and I think we view them pretty similarly. My Karakoram is equipped with Moutain LX shifting and cheaper Exage cantilevers. The rear tire clearance was a major stopper (literally) when doing any kind of mud. The frame, though heavier, was incredibly stiff and strong. We would do stupid young people things like mountain bike tractor pulls loading up logs on a pallete and dragging to a target. The GT was the bike of choice as it never flexed, bent or broke under big torque. Silly kids.
Yes -- it is curious why GT stuck with the rear U brake long after the rest of the industry switched to cantilevers.

Doesnt surprise me you used that bike for impromptu tractor pulls

Clean up your old gal and show 'er some love -- it sounds like it will love you back
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Old 11-18-15, 09:23 PM
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Just recently picked these up. Paid $60, 60, 65 and 20.....all rigid, all Deore DX. The Mongoose may go to a friend soon, the others are gonna hang around a while.
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Old 11-19-15, 01:00 AM
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I think OP's bike, as is, might fetch $40 . . . If all tuned and ready to ride, maybe $80 . . . frame alone, might have to be given away.
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Old 11-19-15, 07:47 AM
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Last winter and spring I sold a couple of ready to ride GT rigid MTBs. One was an Outlook and the other was a Timberline. They had both been fully serviced about a year prior and both were in great mechanical shape and clean. The 22" Outlook(lower level) went for $65 in the middle of winter. The 18.5" Timberline went for $110 in the spring. Both sold within a couple days of listing, probably could have eeked out a little more if I really wanted.
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Old 11-19-15, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by rob_ralph View Post
Just recently picked these up. Paid $60, 60, 65 and 20.....all rigid, all Deore DX. The Mongoose may go to a friend soon, the others are gonna hang around a while.

Nice- a Karakoram and an Avalanche -- i was just talking about those- look like 1990 or 91 models
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Old 11-19-15, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by DMC707 View Post
Nice- a Karakoram and an Avalanche -- i was just talking about those- look like 1990 or 91 models
They are both '91, have seen a few more pop up recently here in SoCal, great bikes. Everyone I've picked up was sold because the front shifter didn't work, so I have become pretty good at disassembling, cleaning/regreasing em.
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Old 11-19-15, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by DMC707 View Post
Nice- a Karakoram and an Avalanche -- i was just talking about those- look like 1990 or 91 models
They are both '91, have seen a few more pop up recently here in SoCal, great bikes. Everyone I've picked up was sold because the front shifter didn't work, so I have become pretty good at disassembling, cleaning/regreasing em.
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