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Peugeot UE-8

Old 06-09-16, 11:39 PM
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Peugeot UE-8

Hi all!

I was thinking about equipping my recently purchased Peugeot PX-10 with steel fenders and racks to make it my commuter bike, but after some homework, I found out I easily had to shell out upwards of $100 US (take the funny price tag on those Mafac front racks for an example) to do a half-decent job, so when I bumped into this UE-8, I said to myself why not keep the PX-10 unchanged for fun rides and get the UE-8 to commute by. I'd heard some good things about the way UO-8's (& UE-8's) ride (and honestly I've always been fascinated by bottle dynamos, so the braze-on, dynamo and the lights were a plus). I bought the bike only today, so I can't really comment as to whether it's a comfortable ride, but I'll report later on. Now, I paid 180 CAD (which Google says is about 140 USD).

Oh, as you can notice, the original Soubitez rearlight has been replaced by another (non-Soubitez) light. Strangely enough when I was testing the dynamo and lights in front the lady I bought the bike from, the rearlight would still flicker, but on the way home it suddenly stopped working (as reported by a friend). So much for a discount!

I should also note that I was told that both tires had been recently replaced.




















Last edited by Renaussens; 06-09-16 at 11:42 PM.
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Old 06-09-16, 11:45 PM
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Some more pictures I took on the way home:











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Old 06-10-16, 12:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Renaussens
I was thinking about equipping my recently purchased Peugeot PX-10 with steel fenders and racks to make it my commuter bike, but after some homework, I found out I easily had to shell out upwards of $100 US (take the funny price tag on those Mafac front racks for an example) to do a half-decent job, so when I bumped into this UE-8, I said to myself why not keep the PX-10 unchanged for fun rides and get the UE-8 to commute by.
Good plan. The PX-10's a race bike, and yours is too nice to relegate to commuter duty. The UE-8 makes a much better pack mule to slog things to and from work. The biggest problem with a stock UE-8 is the steel rims. They've got a reputation for poor braking in wet weather ...not that it ever rains in the Pacific Northwest. ;-) If you choose to swap the wheels out, it probably wouldn't be hard to find a used set of 27" wheels with alloy rims. Or you could even pick up some new ones from Velomine for a little over $100.

In general, you'll run into the same French size & threading on both your Peugeots. The most significant difference is that the UE-8 has a cottered crankset. On the bright side, you won't need a special crank puller like you do for the PX-10. The down side is that cotters need to be pressed in and out, and good luck finding a cotter press. You can probably improvise using a socket and a vise. (Some people use a big ol' hammer, but that's not my preferred method.)

The UE-8 is a very different bike from your PX-10, but I think you'll appreciate 'em both for different reasons. I have a UO-8 that's about the same age as yours and while it's not racy, it's a very stable and comfy ride.

A couple other points of interest you may come across while reading about your new bike: Some stems used on UO-8's and similar Peugeot bikes have a reputation for failure. I don't personally how overblown that reputation is, but at the very least, you'll probably want to inspect your stem to make sure it's not cracked. When you take the headset apart to inspect and grease it, you can take the opportunity to look at the stem since you'll have it out anyway. Also, the delrin (plastic) Simplex derailleurs have a reputation for cracking and failure. You're not at any major risk of injury if it happens, so you can ride 'em until they break (if they ever do), but it's something you may want to keep an eye on. Or you can swap them out as preventive maintenance to prevent breakdowns on the road. Old SunTour derailleurs like a V-GT rear and Spirt front are cheap, rock solid, period correct replacements, although you'd admittedly lose a little Frenchiness.
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Old 06-10-16, 12:30 AM
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...for the record, all French bikes of this period have both bars and stems that will eventually fail given enough hard use. There are a number of old threads explaining what is going on, and you usually get some warning (bars will start to sag a little over time, cracking in the stem at the wedge slot inside the steerer tube.

It's not a big deal to replace them with more modern used parts of 80's Japanese manufacture...you have to sand down a forged stem from 22.2 to 22 at the insertion, and fit it with a bar with a steel central reinforcement sleeve. Yours looks OK from the photos...not real saggy. Depends a lot on use and mileage.
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Old 06-10-16, 02:07 AM
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I would suggest that 3alarmer is overstating the oft repeated, but seldom occuring, stem experience of a certain Sheldon Brown.

Great photos of your new bike, camera phone or not!

Enjoy your new Peugeot.
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Old 06-10-16, 02:11 AM
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer
...for the record, all French bikes of this period have both bars and stems that will eventually fail given enough hard use.
I'm aware of that vintage French aluminum handlebars have a reputation for sagging and failure, but I hadn't personally come across reports of similar problems with steel bars like the one on Renaussen's UE-8. Any problem with those that you're aware of?

I can't draw on experience in this case from my own UO-8 since I swapped its original handlebar for a newer, wider one.
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Old 06-10-16, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75
I'm aware of that vintage French aluminum handlebars have a reputation for sagging and failure, but I hadn't personally come across reports of similar problems with steel bars like the one on Renaussen's UE-8. Any problem with those that you're aware of?

I can't draw on experience in this case from my own UO-8 since I swapped its original handlebar for a newer, wider one.
...no problem with the steel ones other than the extra weight. The stems really are kinda low end junk, mostly. But yeah, if you want to ride them any distance these days, alloy wheel rims and bars are probably a relatively cheap but very functional upgrade.
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Old 06-10-16, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by oddjob2
I would suggest that 3alarmer is overstating the oft repeated, but seldom occuring, stem experience of a certain Sheldon Brown.
...it makes more of an impression if you personally experience it.
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Old 02-09-24, 01:00 AM
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Essential tools

Apart from the cute little Mafac tool kit that comes with the bike if originally purchased, what are some of the essential tools others use. I’m currently in the process of a complete tear down and restoration of my bike. Things like a removal tool for the shimano freewheel and bottom bracket. Not cheap tools but something mid range. Parktool seem expensive but what do others do. And where do you source your tools.
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Old 02-09-24, 04:19 AM
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Not sure I'd want to deal with a cottered crank.
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Old 02-09-24, 07:58 AM
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I wouldn't worry much about the stem or bars on those, I've had mine since 1974, and I'm 6ft 4in and have been over 300lbs most of my adult life. Mine is still just fine and according the old Huret Multito cyclometer, (which still works), mine is approaching its third time around, or close to 30,000 miles. Its on its second rear derailleur, third front derailleur, 9th set of tires, I respoked the front wheel twice, replaced both hubs twice, five rear axles, two bottom bracket kits, and I've re-wrapped the bars about a half dozen times. The original saddle gave way early on so I replaced it with an Ideal leather model taken from a PX-10. Mine has had fenders on it now for 30 years or so, first was a set of Bluemel knockoffs that didn't last long, then a set of aluminum fenders that gave me fits keeping the stays tight, then I found a set of free, uses fenders off a Raleigh Sprite, I stripped those down and painted them argent silver and even used the Raleigh wire stays. They've been on the bike ever since, or about 20 years now.
I quit riding mine after the frame took a hit while riding it one day. A piece of firewood came off a truck and struck the back side of the seat stay putting a rather substantial dent in the frame there. It wasn't even anything that really caught my attention, just a light thump and the bit of wood flipped off the back tire, I didn't even stop, but I found the damage the next morning while checking my tire pressures.
Its bad that the frame is dented, and its bad enough that I won't keep using it, but I was considering dropping down a frame size from the 25" to a 23" . As i get older my knees and back seem to prefer the small frame bikes. I've been keeping my eyes peeled for a good 23" frameset to swap it all over to. (I have a Gitane but its shorter top tube would likely not work well for me. I rode a 23" A-08 for a while and that fit me just fine but I converted that to a three speed about 12 years ago as a simply bike to travel with in the camper with a set of wide tires on it and a set of sks plastic chrome fenders that fit me well when using a set of alloy north road style bars and a cruiser saddle.
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Old 02-09-24, 10:21 AM
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Iconic bike in a great color!
Since this isn't really a valuation thread you might want to ask the mod's to move it to the regular "Classic and vintage" forum for greater exposure.
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Old 02-09-24, 10:49 AM
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$180 CND is fair, depending on location. I have owed a couple and the ride quality is not bad but can easily be improved (a lot) by swapping those steel patterned rims for alloy ones. Other than that, enjoy.
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Old 02-09-24, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by grechan
what are some of the essential tools others use.?
You just bumped an eight year old thread for an unrelated question.

The Advanced Search works great when searching on thread title, like "tools." Or start a new thread in the appropriate subforum.
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Old 02-09-24, 04:23 PM
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Yes this is a bit of a zombie thread but UO-8,s and variants have come down a lot and UE-10's/PX10's a lot. From $100-200 U08's to $75-100 and PX-10' series stuff $600-1000 to $150-400. Yes the market has come down that much IMHO can't find a real example of either of these selling at a good price in 3 years or so.

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Old 02-09-24, 10:44 PM
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Bumping an old thread

Originally Posted by SurferRosa
You just bumped an eight year old thread for an unrelated question.

The Advanced Search works great when searching on thread title, like "tools." Or start a new thread in the appropriate subforum.
Thank you ever so much. That is very kind of you.
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