Notices
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals. Use this subforum for all requests as to "How much is this vintage bike worth?"Do NOT try to sell it in here, use the Marketplaces.

Need help from Bianchi owners

Old 10-23-16, 04:43 PM
  #1  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Need help from Bianchi owners

Quick question for you fellow Bianchi owners.

I really don't know much about Bianchi. Can anyone help me to identify this bike? It comes with Shimano 105 group set and Dura ace headset. As far as I know, it still ride well. It weighs at about 10kg (22lbs). Thatís all I know. I will post some more pics tomorrow if it would helps.

My questions are:

- what type/series? which reparto corse?
- year of production?
- is it original/counterfeit?
- how much is it worth?
- high quality or low level stuff?

Most importantly, is it really handmade in Italy? Iím asking this because I was thinking about restoring it (if it still holds a value). Iím planning to retain the original frame, but put some modern and lighter components. Perhaps, make her all Italian, if possible.

Any thoughts? comments?




imanoff is offline  
Old 10-23-16, 11:02 PM
  #2  
no1mad 
Thunder Whisperer
 
no1mad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: NE OK
Posts: 8,852

Bikes: '06 Kona Smoke

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 274 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 2 Posts
Moved from C & V- primarily due to the valuation.
__________________
Community guidelines
no1mad is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 03:31 PM
  #3  
PaintItCeleste
Senior Member
 
PaintItCeleste's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 219

Bikes: My wife says "Too Many"

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just throwing it out there, my opinions, so take them for what they're worth. This definitely isn't counterfit as it's not any notable model worth the effort. I would say, this bike "is what it is". An entry- to-mid-range aluminum alloy frame with CF fork bike. The components are fine. Bread and butter and work well. Altogether in present condition (assuming everything is working), in my area, you wouldn't have trouble getting $350-400 for it given the integrated shifters/new-ish components, brand name, and the dash of celeste color. As far as upgrading it or building it up Italian, you could do that but I would say there are far nicer frames out there more worthy of the effort. The welds on this frame alone are rather unsightly.

Also, in the future, when looking for more info on a bike be sure to capture and post images of the drive-side (side with the crank and derailleurs) as that gives us a little more insight into the componentry and condition of important bits.
PaintItCeleste is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 04:05 PM
  #4  
SkyDog75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,794

Bikes: Bianchi San Mateo and a few others

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 634 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
For model identification and valuation, it would be handy to know your location.

Bianchi, like many companies, has sold different products in different markets. For example, as far as I'm aware, my Bianchi San Mateo was only marketed in the U.S. If someone's going to sift through catalogs to help identify your bike, let's help them make sure they're looking at the right country's catalogs.

Used bike prices also vary a LOT by locale. For example, I'm in New York, but a rural part of the state and nowhere near New York City. A bike that'll sell for $200 in a heartbeat in the city might sit unsold for weeks with a $100 asking price here.
SkyDog75 is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 06:16 PM
  #5  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by PaintItCeleste View Post
Just throwing it out there, my opinions, so take them for what they're worth. This definitely isn't counterfit as it's not any notable model worth the effort. I would say, this bike "is what it is". An entry- to-mid-range aluminum alloy frame with CF fork bike. The components are fine. Bread and butter and work well. Altogether in present condition (assuming everything is working), in my area, you wouldn't have trouble getting $350-400 for it given the integrated shifters/new-ish components, brand name, and the dash of celeste color. As far as upgrading it or building it up Italian, you could do that but I would say there are far nicer frames out there more worthy of the effort. The welds on this frame alone are rather unsightly.

Also, in the future, when looking for more info on a bike be sure to capture and post images of the drive-side (side with the crank and derailleurs) as that gives us a little more insight into the componentry and condition of important bits.
Thank you for your reply and thorough explanantion. I guess I will just keep it as it is as my everyday ride. Everything is working and in a pleasant condition at this moment. I just need to replace the brake pad as it is already worn out.

Also, apologise for the pictures. Next time, I will post pictures of the drive-side with the derailleurs etc. Well noted with thanks.

Out of curiousity, assuming that I have a budget at around $1,000-ish and I want to restore/rebuild a nice and lightweight (US or Italian/European) vintage frame that are worth more the effort, what would you recommend?

Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
For model identification and valuation, it would be handy to know your location.

Bianchi, like many companies, has sold different products in different markets. For example, as far as I'm aware, my Bianchi San Mateo was only marketed in the U.S. If someone's going to sift through catalogs to help identify your bike, let's help them make sure they're looking at the right country's catalogs.

Used bike prices also vary a LOT by locale. For example, I'm in New York, but a rural part of the state and nowhere near New York City. A bike that'll sell for $200 in a heartbeat in the city might sit unsold for weeks with a $100 asking price here.
Thanks for your reply. The previous owner said that the bike was Asian market. Not sure which part of Asia though. So, I suppose, if I am looking for a vintage bike at cheaper price, then the best way to do that is take a look at the advertisements/Craiglists/eBay from the rural part of the state and far from the big cities?

One more question, with regard to the alumunium/alloy, is there any lifetime usage of the bike? I mean, will they became worn out, fatigued, etc after 20ish years or so?
imanoff is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 06:43 PM
  #6  
Clang
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: South of the Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 4,772
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 905 Post(s)
Liked 871 Times in 642 Posts
Originally Posted by imanoff View Post

- year of production?

Iím planning to retain the original frame, but put some modern and lighter components.
Try figuring out the year of production by using the Shimano date codes on the inside of the crank arms. Shimano date codes Example: if the cranks are 2001, then the bike is either a 2001 or year 2002 model.

Ride it as is for a while to figure out if you like the way the frame feels & fits before tossing a bunch of money at replacing already modern(ish) components.
Clang is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 08:39 PM
  #7  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Clang View Post
Try figuring out the year of production by using the Shimano date codes on the inside of the crank arms. Shimano date codes Example: if the cranks are 2001, then the bike is either a 2001 or year 2002 model.

Ride it as is for a while to figure out if you like the way the frame feels & fits before tossing a bunch of money at replacing already modern(ish) components.
Thanks for your reply. I did take a look at the Shimano crank arms but could only find these numbers/letters (see the attached pictures). I'm not sure if those letters/numbers represent the year of production or so. I googled "Shimano BB 170 FC 5502" but could not find anything either.






imanoff is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 08:40 PM
  #8  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
[sorry, double posts]

Last edited by imanoff; 10-27-16 at 11:36 AM. Reason: Double postings
imanoff is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 08:43 PM
  #9  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
[sorry, double posts]

Last edited by imanoff; 10-27-16 at 11:36 AM. Reason: Double postings
imanoff is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 08:44 PM
  #10  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
[sorry, double posts]

Last edited by imanoff; 10-27-16 at 11:35 AM. Reason: Double postings
imanoff is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 08:57 PM
  #11  
PaintItCeleste
Senior Member
 
PaintItCeleste's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 219

Bikes: My wife says "Too Many"

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
No need to apologize! Just letting you know, we're all new at some point. No worries! As far as what to build up, it's really so subjective, I can't say I have any answer other than to echo whats been mentioned about familiarizing yourself with things you do and do not like about frames. This unfortunately can only be determined by you and with experience. Obviously you can peruse the forums and see which frames hold more mass appeal, but in terms of figuring out what is "worth the effort", that's all you. I put more than a few hundred dollars into a pretty benign Bianchi Trofeo frame because I love the color and ride. It's by no means a high-end, sought-after frame. But I love it.
PaintItCeleste is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 10:17 PM
  #12  
SkyDog75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,794

Bikes: Bianchi San Mateo and a few others

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 634 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by imanoff View Post
One more question, with regard to the alumunium/alloy, is there any lifetime usage of the bike? I mean, will they became worn out, fatigued, etc after 20ish years or so?
Aluminum does fatigue when flexed, but the engineers who design a bike should take that into consideration and take appropriate measures to prevent/prolong/minimize fatigue failures. It's not unheard of to make durable machines out of aluminum. There are lots of aluminum airplanes that have been flying for decades; the youngest B-52 bomber in service is over 50 years old.

Ride it and keep on riding it. Inspect it periodically because frames occasionally fail no matter what they're made of.
SkyDog75 is offline  
Old 10-24-16, 10:28 PM
  #13  
exxongraftek
Senior Member
 
exxongraftek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Bike Heaven (Sunnyvale CA)
Posts: 767

Bikes: No-name LH drive track. Also ride an Exxon Graftek, a Masi, a Trek R200 or a RR Boneshaker for fun!

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by imanoff View Post
Thanks for your reply. I did take a look at the Shimano crank arms but could only find these numbers/letters (see the attached pictures). I'm not sure if those letters/numbers represent the year of production or so. I googled "Shimano BB 170 FC 5502" but could not find anything either.
The BA and BB codes pictured indicate January or February 2003.
exxongraftek is offline  
Old 10-25-16, 03:29 AM
  #14  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Many... many thanks for all your replies. I appreciate it much.

I learned a lot from this forum for sure.

Last edited by imanoff; 10-25-16 at 08:06 AM.
imanoff is offline  
Old 10-26-16, 07:13 AM
  #15  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 28,302

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 154 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2315 Post(s)
Liked 1,326 Times in 793 Posts
Can you post a few more pics? Is there a sticker denoting the tubing?

Most true Reparto Course bikes cameras frame only or with very unique kits. So if that had a 105 group that is what the original or previous owner put on it.

As to you idea of "restoration" either I misread something your idea of restoration is confused. Restoration would mean putting the bike back in the condition it was when it first sold. Cleaning the frame and putting newer components on it isn't a restoration.
__________________
ďOne morning you wake up, the girl is gone, the bikes are gone, all that's left behind is a pair of old tires and a tube of tubular glue, all squeezed out"

Sugar "Kane" Kowalczyk
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 10-26-16, 11:27 AM
  #16  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 22,546
Mentioned: 599 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4411 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2,388 Times in 1,552 Posts
The frame is a Bianchi L-Lite made from 7005 aluminum. The presence of the Mercatone-Uno decal on the fork indicates it is no newer than 2003. That particular livery was introduced in 2000, so we have a fairly narrow time frame. However, the serial number suggests it may be from 2001, in which case it could be a 2001 or 2002 model. During this era, the L-Lite series frames were 2nd in the Bianchi hierarchy with the XL series being at the top.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 10-26-16, 02:56 PM
  #17  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 28,302

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 154 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2315 Post(s)
Liked 1,326 Times in 793 Posts
But we're they real Reparto Course machines?
__________________
ďOne morning you wake up, the girl is gone, the bikes are gone, all that's left behind is a pair of old tires and a tube of tubular glue, all squeezed out"

Sugar "Kane" Kowalczyk
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 10-26-16, 04:12 PM
  #18  
Kevindale
Senior Member
 
Kevindale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Amsterdam
Posts: 1,684

Bikes: 1980 Koga-Miyata Gentsluxe-S, 1998 Eddy Merckx Corsa 01, 1983 Tommasini Racing, 2012 Gulf Western CAAD10, 1980 Univega Gran Premio

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 600 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
That's a good looking bike, even if it's not vintage steel. Don't worry about wearing out an aluminum frame. There are lots of them on the road with many thousands of miles on them built up over 20 years. If it gets crashed hard, then you may have to worry, but otherwise ride and enjoy. My wife has a '92 Cannondale that is still going strong.

As for a vintage bike worth restoring or refreshing, if your budget is around $1000, you can go fairly high end. The list of worthy Italian/European/US bikes is long. Spend a few evenings on the regular C&V subforum looking at old threads, like the 'grail bikes' thread. The 'are you looking for one of these' threads also highlights available, desirable bikes, especially ones that might be well priced. You'll start to see the same brands and same models come up again and again, with good discussions of their pros and cons.
Kevindale is offline  
Old 10-26-16, 06:46 PM
  #19  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
Can you post a few more pics? Is there a sticker denoting the tubing?

Most true Reparto Course bikes cameras frame only or with very unique kits. So if that had a 105 group that is what the original or previous owner put on it.

As to you idea of "restoration" either I misread something your idea of restoration is confused. Restoration would mean putting the bike back in the condition it was when it first sold. Cleaning the frame and putting newer components on it isn't a restoration.
Thanks for your reply. I stand corrected. What I mean is not "restorate", instead "rejuvenate" some of the older parts.

And here are a couple of pictures.







Look forward to hear your thoughts/comments.

Last edited by imanoff; 10-27-16 at 01:14 AM. Reason: picture not loaded
imanoff is offline  
Old 10-28-16, 08:59 AM
  #20  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The frame is a Bianchi L-Lite made from 7005 aluminum. The presence of the Mercatone-Uno decal on the fork indicates it is no newer than 2003. That particular livery was introduced in 2000, so we have a fairly narrow time frame. However, the serial number suggests it may be from 2001, in which case it could be a 2001 or 2002 model. During this era, the L-Lite series frames were 2nd in the Bianchi hierarchy with the XL series being at the top.
Originally Posted by Kevindale View Post
That's a good looking bike, even if it's not vintage steel. Don't worry about wearing out an aluminum frame. There are lots of them on the road with many thousands of miles on them built up over 20 years. If it gets crashed hard, then you may have to worry, but otherwise ride and enjoy. My wife has a '92 Cannondale that is still going strong.

As for a vintage bike worth restoring or refreshing, if your budget is around $1000, you can go fairly high end. The list of worthy Italian/European/US bikes is long. Spend a few evenings on the regular C&V subforum looking at old threads, like the 'grail bikes' thread. The 'are you looking for one of these' threads also highlights available, desirable bikes, especially ones that might be well priced. You'll start to see the same brands and same models come up again and again, with good discussions of their pros and cons.
Thank you for your comments. I guess I will just keep riding it and enjoying it as much as I can. I am glad that this is a good bike, even though it's not vintage/collectible.

As for the restoring/refreshing, I will take a look at C&V subforum. Many thanks for your suggestion.
imanoff is offline  
Old 10-28-16, 09:15 AM
  #21  
Kevindale
Senior Member
 
Kevindale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Amsterdam
Posts: 1,684

Bikes: 1980 Koga-Miyata Gentsluxe-S, 1998 Eddy Merckx Corsa 01, 1983 Tommasini Racing, 2012 Gulf Western CAAD10, 1980 Univega Gran Premio

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 600 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
What kind of fork does it have? I can't tell if it's carbon fiber. A CF fork will really smooth out the alloy frame -- a lot less vibrations on the hands. Just make sure there are no significant gouges or deep scratches in it, if it is CG, as that can be a failure point.

It looks like you're running 23 mm tires. You don't seem to have too much room to go much bigger, but when you wear those out you might try 25 mm tires, so you can run lower air pressure and also get a more supple ride. Won't be a dramatic difference, but every bit helps.
Kevindale is offline  
Old 10-29-16, 10:28 AM
  #22  
imanoff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Kevindale View Post
What kind of fork does it have? I can't tell if it's carbon fiber. A CF fork will really smooth out the alloy frame -- a lot less vibrations on the hands. Just make sure there are no significant gouges or deep scratches in it, if it is CG, as that can be a failure point.

It looks like you're running 23 mm tires. You don't seem to have too much room to go much bigger, but when you wear those out you might try 25 mm tires, so you can run lower air pressure and also get a more supple ride. Won't be a dramatic difference, but every bit helps.
It comes with a CF fork. Not in a perfect condition though, since there are a couple of scratches, but still absorb the vibrations quite well.

Yes, I'm running a 23 mm at the moment. I'll try to use 25 instead when my current tires worn out.

Cheers!
imanoff is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
skou
Classic & Vintage
6
04-29-19 01:20 PM
arizona cowboy
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals.
4
06-17-17 11:50 AM
spiritprince
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals.
3
07-04-13 05:42 AM
bikemanbob
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals.
10
06-24-11 07:51 PM
Error
Road Cycling
2
03-14-11 05:20 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.