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Specialized RockHopper 26

Old 11-14-16, 01:46 PM
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maverickfhs
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Specialized RockHopper 26

Folks, I have recently picked up this Specialized RockHopper 26. Owner had no idea which year it is from.

But looking at the web, seems to be 1995 or 1996. Is this true? It does not have any suspension.

Can you please look at the pictures and confirm? Also, how much would it be worth?

In order for me to go through the whole tune up, would it be too expensive?

Thanks
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Old 11-14-16, 03:02 PM
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6 speed in the back..... earlier than 90s
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Old 11-14-16, 03:33 PM
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What year do you think it would be from then? How much is it worth? Thanks
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Old 11-14-16, 03:38 PM
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The very earliest it could be is 1994 from looking at the graphics (the pointy lettered Rockhopper wordmark). Looks curiously low-end for a Rockhopper (Specialized's mid-tier mtb), so I'm guessing this is a kid's model. That could be why the 26" tire size is mentioned and why the frame's so small. The MJ II derailleurs were Shimano's children's models. Quoting from disraeligears: "Shimano launched the MJ with much fanfare as a derailleur specifically designed for children’s bikes."

Online catalog scans tend to skip over the kid's stuff, so I wasn't able to find it in the pdfs I have. As for a model year, check the inside of the crank arms for a date code. Shimano date codes

As a kid's bike from a major manufacturer, it's worth maybe $60.
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Old 11-14-16, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Clang View Post
The very earliest it could be is 1994 from looking at the graphics (the pointy lettered Rockhopper wordmark). Looks curiously low-end for a Rockhopper (Specialized's mid-tier mtb), so I'm guessing this is a kid's model. That could be why the 26" tire size is mentioned and why the frame's so small. The MJ II derailleurs were Shimano's children's models. Quoting from disraeligears: "Shimano launched the MJ with much fanfare as a derailleur specifically designed for children’s bikes."

Online catalog scans tend to skip over the kid's stuff, so I wasn't able to find it in the pdfs I have. As for a model year, check the inside of the crank arms for a date code. Shimano date codes

As a kid's bike from a major manufacturer, it's worth maybe $60.

Thanks very much. Doing all the tune up and going through the bike from front to back and top to bottom, how much would it be appriximately? I am ~5"7 and this bike seems to be a fit for me or would it be weird being a kids bike?

Thanks again.
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Old 11-14-16, 04:27 PM
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The components match what Bikepedia lists for a 1995 RockHopper 24.


It's a really small bike. if you're 5'7" it probably doesn't "fit" you in the sense that it's the best size for your body dimensions. You might be able to ride it without unreasonable discomfort, but that's something different. But if you like the way it feels, don't let the fact that it was originally marketed as a kid's bike put you off. That just means it's really small.


What needs to be tuned up in your view? You could do as little as oiling the chain and putting air in the tires if the shifting works OK. That wouldn't cost you anything. Minor shifting problems can also be fixed for the cost of your time. If the shift and brake cables need to be replaced, that would cost around $20 (cheaper if you don't mind flexy cables). You might want new brakes pads for a bike that age, which could be another $20 or so.
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Old 11-14-16, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
The components match what Bikepedia lists for a 1995 or 1996 RockHopper 24.


It's a really small bike. if you're 5'7" it probably doesn't "fit" you in the sense that it's the best size for your body dimensions. You might be able to ride it without unreasonable discomfort, but that's something different. But if you like the way it feels, don't let the fact that it was originally marketed as a kid's bike put you off. That just means it's really small.


What needs to be tuned up in your view? You could do as little as oiling the chain and putting air in the tires if the shifting works OK. That wouldn't cost you anything. Minor shifting problems can also be fixed for the cost of your time. If the shift and brake cables need to be replaced, that would cost around $20 (cheaper if you don't mind flexy cables). You might want new brakes pads for a bike that age, which could be another $20 or so.
Thanks very much. But the bike says 26 on it. Does it mean it's a 24 or 26?

It needs some serious cleaning. I was planning to clean and lube the chain/sprockets and other components. Brakes feel good and tires are holding air.

What else should be lubed/greased? Can I put road tires on it, or no? Thank you.
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Old 11-14-16, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
The components match what Bikepedia lists for a 1995 RockHopper 24.
But it never came in that color which this bike has(black cherry)? Right?
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Old 11-14-16, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by maverickfhs View Post
Thanks very much. But the bike says 26 on it. Does it mean it's a 24 or 26?

Yeah, I noticed after posting that there was a RockHopper 26 with the same components (and was available in Black Cherry). That was also available in a slightly larger size (17") which might reasonably fit you. It's hard to tell from the pictures, but the bike looked smaller than that to me.


This is probably your bike: https://bikepedia.com/QuickBike/BikeS...=RockHopper+26

Originally Posted by maverickfhs View Post
It needs some serious cleaning. I was planning to clean and lube the chain/sprockets and other components. Brakes feel good and tires are holding air.

What else should be lubed/greased? Can I put road tires on it, or no? Thank you.
For a full overhaul there are a bunch of things that need grease. If you're doing it for yourself you can put them off until you notice problems, but it will generally work better if you do them. After the chain, greasing the hub and headset bearings would be my next step. The bottom bracket might need service, but I'm not sure what you've got there. If it's the cartridge type standard procedure is to just spend $20 and replace it. If it's loose ball you can do that with grease too. The freewheel is also a fairly disposable part, which is about $20 to replace. All of these things require special tools, but if you have access to a bike co-op you can borrow them there.


I'd recommend limiting the cash outlay to oil and grease unless you want to consider it a learning project (and it would be great for that).


You can get slick or semi-slick tires in that size. They're not exactly road tires, but much more appropriate for pavement than what's on there now. If you expect to ride it a lot, check out Panaracer Paselas. For half that price you can find some Kendas that will work OK.
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Old 11-14-16, 05:19 PM
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Would the serial number help? I had it posted in one of the pict above.

You are a magician, it seems like 13.5" inches frame.

Call me a 'cheap bastard' but I would like to tune up everything for 'Free'. I have plenty of grease, dry lubricants( for motorcycle chains), cleaners, degreasers, kerosene oil etc...

I have many tools for car/motorcycles and all. Do I need anything special for this bike to grease hub/bottom bracket and headset bearing?

I can use these tires, till they are bald or need replacement. Then will look into tires, but if they are super cheap I can bite the bullet now too?

Thanks again
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Old 11-14-16, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by maverickfhs View Post
Would the serial number help? I had it posted in one of the pict above.
It wouldn't help me. Somebody here might be able to tell you something from it.


Originally Posted by maverickfhs View Post
You are a magician, it seems like 13.5" inches frame.
I'd have gotten there quicker if I had read the "26" in your title. I saw the marking in the picture but couldn't make out what it said.


Originally Posted by maverickfhs View Post
Call me a 'cheap bastard' but I would like to tune up everything for 'Free'. I have plenty of grease, dry lubricants( for motorcycle chains), cleaners, degreasers, kerosene oil etc...

I have many tools for car/motorcycles and all. Do I need anything special for this bike to grease hub/bottom bracket and headset bearing?
Cheap/free is what I'd be going for on a bike like this. You'll need cone wrenches for the hubs, some combination of 13, 15 and 17 mm...maybe two of one of those sizes. I don't know off hand which size you need. The key thing is that a standard wrench is too thick to do the job. You could improvise something if you are good with metal working and don't want to obtain the right tool, but the right tool makes it much easier. The headset requires another thin wrench, this one 30 or 32 mm, but it doesn't need to be as thin and sometimes you can get by without it (though you're likely to leave the locknut loose if you do it that way). The bottom bracket gets really tricky because you need one specialized tool to remove the crank arms and another one to open up the bottom bracket.

If you don't want to buy the right tools for this job and you can't do the work at a co-op, I'd recommend just hoping it's OK the way it is. The cone wrenches run about $9 each and you might need as many as three. The headset wrench is about $15. The crank puller sells for about $15, and the bottom bracket tool might be around $20.


Originally Posted by maverickfhs View Post
I can use these tires, till they are bald or need replacement. Then will look into tires, but if they are super cheap I can bite the bullet now too?
Semi-slick tires will make the bike much more enjoyable to ride on pavement, but they will limit its off-road use. The cheapest ones sell for around $15 each. The ones I'd want for regular use are around $30 each.
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Old 11-14-16, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
It wouldn't help me. Somebody here might be able to tell you something from it.




I'd have gotten there quicker if I had read the "26" in your title. I saw the marking in the picture but couldn't make out what it said.




Cheap/free is what I'd be going for on a bike like this. You'll need cone wrenches for the hubs, some combination of 13, 15 and 17 mm...maybe two of one of those sizes. I don't know off hand which size you need. The key thing is that a standard wrench is too thick to do the job. You could improvise something if you are good with metal working and don't want to obtain the right tool, but the right tool makes it much easier. The headset requires another thin wrench, this one 30 or 32 mm, but it doesn't need to be as thin and sometimes you can get by without it (though you're likely to leave the locknut loose if you do it that way). The bottom bracket gets really tricky because you need one specialized tool to remove the crank arms and another one to open up the bottom bracket.

If you don't want to buy the right tools for this job and you can't do the work at a co-op, I'd recommend just hoping it's OK the way it is. The cone wrenches run about $9 each and you might need as many as three. The headset wrench is about $15. The crank puller sells for about $15, and the bottom bracket tool might be around $20.




Semi-slick tires will make the bike much more enjoyable to ride on pavement, but they will limit its off-road use. The cheapest ones sell for around $15 each. The ones I'd want for regular use are around $30 each.
Thanks again.

Let me ask you a stupid question, so I have a cheap Walmart brand (magna, I think) bike with shocks on the front and rear but heavy as hell and brakes are not the best either.

If I have to overhaul/tune up/spend money, which one would be a better choice, this one or Walmart one?

I'll decide based on the input from you guys.

Thanks again guys
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Old 11-14-16, 10:40 PM
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I think the Specialzed is probably the better bike, but if the Walmart bike is relatively new some of its components might be useful as spares.
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Old 11-15-16, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by maverickfhs View Post
Thanks again.

Let me ask you a stupid question, so I have a cheap Walmart brand (magna, I think) bike with shocks on the front and rear but heavy as hell and brakes are not the best either.

If I have to overhaul/tune up/spend money, which one would be a better choice, this one or Walmart one?

I'll decide based on the input from you guys.

Thanks again guys
I fully refurbish 80s and 90s road bikes, hybrids, and mountain bikes as a hobby and sell them on craigslist. 90s mountain bikes, as you have learned here, arent particularly valuable. With that said...
After refurbishing a 90s rigid(no shock) mountain bike(all components cleaned, rust removed, new grease in all bearings, new cables and housing, and maybe new tires/grips/seat) I will list and sell it for $120-160 depending on the brand and model.
The bikes are, in my opinion, 10x better than a Magna with shock. They will be lighter, the components will be higher quality(even thought the are 20+ years old), the components will work better since the bike was built and adjusted properly, and you wont have a pointless heavy shock to deal with.

You could take the Rockhopper, once refurbished, and ride it for a couple thousand miles each year for the next few years and most likely only have to replace a couple tubes due to flat tires. That cant be said about any off the shelf big box store bike I have seen.
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Old 11-15-16, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
I fully refurbish 80s and 90s road bikes, hybrids, and mountain bikes as a hobby and sell them on craigslist. 90s mountain bikes, as you have learned here, arent particularly valuable. With that said...
After refurbishing a 90s rigid(no shock) mountain bike(all components cleaned, rust removed, new grease in all bearings, new cables and housing, and maybe new tires/grips/seat) I will list and sell it for $120-160 depending on the brand and model.
The bikes are, in my opinion, 10x better than a Magna with shock. They will be lighter, the components will be higher quality(even thought the are 20+ years old), the components will work better since the bike was built and adjusted properly, and you wont have a pointless heavy shock to deal with.

You could take the Rockhopper, once refurbished, and ride it for a couple thousand miles each year for the next few years and most likely only have to replace a couple tubes due to flat tires. That cant be said about any off the shelf big box store bike I have seen.
You guys are awesome. Another really best advice. I mean, I can lift this thing with one hand while Magna is a big back breaker!

Since you do this as a hobby and living, I definitely appreciate your advice.

Do you have any DYI videos or any website which I can refer to while I do all 'Free' maintenance on it, utilizing all the tools and grease/lubricants I have?

I am going to hold on to this one and see what I can learn on it. Since this definitely seems lighter and better than Magna.
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Old 11-15-16, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
I think the Specialzed is probably the better bike, but if the Walmart bike is relatively new some of its components might be useful as spares.
Thanks, man you are a rock star. Extremely helpful and kind
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Old 11-15-16, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by maverickfhs View Post
Do you have any DYI videos or any website which I can refer to while I do all 'Free' maintenance on it, utilizing all the tools and grease/lubricants I have?
To learn, I used youtube, Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information, and Home Page | Park Tool
Combined, the 3 sites will answer any question you have and show you video how to do something or have still pics of the process.
I basically googled a bunch. So 'remove crankset, parktool' for example. That would lead me to park tool's website where they walk you thru removing multiple types of cranks.

As mentioned earlier, you need a few specific tools. There is just no good and realistic way to remove a square taper bottom bracket besides the specific tool. Cone wrenches, to me, are necessary. You can actually get double sided park tool cone wrenches(so 2 sizes for each wrench) for $6 or so online.
One other specific tool you will need is a cassette lockring remover. Its made to fit in the cassette and turns it to allow you to remove the cassette on the back wheel. This is necessary to both clean and regrease the rear wheel hub bearings.
You could clean the chain without removing it, but it wont be very clean. Again, thats a tool which is specific to the job.

There are about 4 tools at a minimum that are specific to bike maintenance. The rest of the bike build is mostly bolts which connect in standardized ways.
4 tools- crankset puller, chain breaker, cassette lockring remover, cone wrenches.



My advice, if you choose to tear the bike down, is take pictures before you do something. For example, if you remove the fork and headset to clean and regrease the headset- then take pics so you have an easy reference for what stacks above or below what. Another example is a wheel hub. There are multiple spacers and threaded parts on each side of the hub. Take a pic so you can easily reference the order they go back on. This was very helpful to me until I got the hang of it.
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Old 11-15-16, 09:19 AM
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Thanks again for referring me to these websites. I really appreciate it.

Can I buy any of these at Harbor Freight or some other cheap alternative(https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from...ches&_sop=15)? 4 tools- crankset puller, chain breaker, cassette lockring remover, cone wrenches.

Are they going to be standard say if I continue with bike journey? I'll clean up everything and get going in the coming days.

Just curious, if I have to ask questions about maintenance of it, should I continue on this thread or post somewhere else?

Thanks again.

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Old 11-15-16, 10:18 AM
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hit up the mechanics forum on this site. there are a bunch of posters who are experienced and its an active forum so you will get help relatively quickly.
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Old 11-15-16, 10:28 AM
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What mstateglfr said is solid advice except that I'm pretty sure your bike has a freewheel, not a cassette, and that requires a different tool plus a chain whip (although the chain whip can be improvised with a piece of old chain).

Some of the tools here are specific to older bikes, but they are all pretty common. I started with a couple of the double sided cone wrenches but eventually bought the Park cone wrench with the rubber handles because they are a lot nicer to use. Performance Bike is a good source for cheap tools, as is eBay, but as you probably already know some tools you can get away with cheap and others you end up regretting it. You probably have some feel for which is which, I'm guessing.

You'll get a lot more responses to future maintenance questions if you post in the bicycle mechanics forum.
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Old 11-15-16, 10:34 AM
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Thanks again Andy_K and mstateglfr.

You guys are extremely helpful

I have posted in the mechanics section and BTW, I have a motorcycle chain breaker tool. It might work too, right?

You are so right, but I don't want to start with snap on or Proto etc.. and break the back. I would rather start with cheap harbor freight and get going
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