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1993 Univega Alpina Pro

Old 05-27-17, 04:43 PM
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Chukbacca
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1993 Univega Alpina Pro

Hey all!

I'm a casual rider who typically only rides a mile or two a day; maybe in an extreme case I ride my daughter to Grandma's house with a pedal trailer in tow.

I picked up a 1993 Univega Alpina Pro off Craigslist for less than $50. It looks to me like it has been well taken care of, especially compared to previous bikes I have owned. (The tires are nearly new and alone would have cost $50)

Would you all mind sharing what maintenance schedule you would recommend? I'm in Southern California so most of my putting around will be dry with an occasional puddle. Also, what's the scoop on the brakes below the bottom bracket? I've never seen that before.

Is there anything you'd be willing to share regarding it's value and the quality of it's components?

Thanks a bunch!
(I will I include pictures as soon as I figure it out)

Chuck
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Old 05-27-17, 04:50 PM
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That is a very solid price on an old mountain bike. Pics would be very helpful. You'll need to overhaul the bike completely (headset, bottom bracket, and hubs at a minimum). Look for grade 25 ball bearings and get some good grease like Park or Phil Wood. I'd also replace all the consumables (chain, cables, housing).

This was an upper level mountain bike back in the day. Value is tough. Old mountain bikes aren't worth much usually (there are some exceptions) but you live in a fairly hot market so you did well at $50. Heck I'd pay $50 for one of those in Des Moines.

You will also want to replace the tires with some slicks (probably 26 x 1.5 or 1.75) for general road riding. Resist getting skinny tires (1.25 or narrower). This bike has a good plush ride and a little fatter tire run at lower pressure will bring out its ride qualities.
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Old 05-27-17, 06:11 PM
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I had one of these for a little while, and when I think about it I still kick myself for letting it go. My Alpina Pro was a very lightweight and fun-to-ride bike, and I actually preferred it to the vintage StumpJumper I briefly owned.

Mine wasn't the same year (IIRC it was a '96) and it had the brakes "where they're supposed to be." Not sure of the logic behind moving calipers below the chainstays, although I'm sure someone else can clue you in. Here's a shot of mine, because every thread needs an image.



Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
You will also want to replace the tires with some slicks (probably 26 x 1.5 or 1.75) for general road riding. Resist getting skinny tires (1.25 or narrower). This bike has a good plush ride and a little fatter tire run at lower pressure will bring out its ride qualities.
+1... The tires pictured above may even be 26 x 2.25 -- tons o' room to go big.
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Old 05-27-17, 06:35 PM
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Chain stay mounted brakes became popular in the late 1980s. This frame is much stronger and stiffer in this area than the traditional seat stay mounting area. Consequently, when the brakes are applied there is less reaction from stays to flex outward and decrease braking effectiveness. While the improvement was tangible, the location made it much harder to set-up and adjust the brakes. It was also prone to mud build-up. Their popularity waned waned after a few years.

Edit: Are you sure this isn't more like 1987-1989? 1993 is very late for a chain stay mounted brake on a high end ATB. Pics? Serial number?

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Old 05-27-17, 06:49 PM
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Thread moved to C&V Appraisals.
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Old 05-27-17, 07:42 PM
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brakes below the chainstays suggest late 80s.. a Alpina Pro was the top of the line marque for univega brand, but pics showing condition and current components will be needed to guess the value. 50-200 depending on condition and market.

as far as maintenance, like any other bike you could grease the bearings and replace the cables/housing if they are in bad shape, but if you're just going to be putting around I wouldn't mess with it unless something is obvious wrong
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Old 05-28-17, 10:08 AM
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Hi all. Thanks for the responses! The bikes frame number is M7I 16347

The fellow told me his dad was the original owner, and his dad gave it to him years ago. He decided to ride it in a small event with his wife, thus the new tires. Truthfully, I think he may have had it gone through by the lbs.

Seriously, this bike rides nicer than anything I have ever ridden (granted, my history has had a lot of crap bikes).

One last note...it appears that the bike has storage for extra spokes (on the frame, between the chains)

I appreciate your feedback!

Pictures soon!
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Old 05-28-17, 12:05 PM
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The frame was manufactured in September 1987, so it's almost certainly a 1988 model, which explains the presence of chain stay mounted brakes.

Chain stay mounted spoke holders were a feature on the Alpina series in 1988. In addition to holding spokes, they also protected the chain stay from chain bash, provided spare spokes were carried.
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Old 05-28-17, 12:55 PM
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This is great! Thank you so much!
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The frame was manufactured in September 1987, so it's almost certainly a 1988 model, which explains the presence of chain stay mounted brakes.

Chain stay mounted spoke holders were a feature on the Alpina series in 1988. In addition to holding spokes, they also protected the chain stay from chain bash, provided spare spokes were carried.
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Old 05-28-17, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
That is a very solid price on an old mountain bike. Pics would be very helpful. You'll need to overhaul the bike completely (headset, bottom bracket, and hubs at a minimum). Look for grade 25 ball bearings and get some good grease like Park or Phil Wood. I'd also replace all the consumables (chain, cables, housing).

This was an upper level mountain bike back in the day. Value is tough. Old mountain bikes aren't worth much usually (there are some exceptions) but you live in a fairly hot market so you did well at $50. Heck I'd pay $50 for one of those in Des Moines.

You will also want to replace the tires with some slicks (probably 26 x 1.5 or 1.75) for general road riding. Resist getting skinny tires (1.25 or narrower). This bike has a good plush ride and a little fatter tire run at lower pressure will bring out its ride qualities.
Here are some pictures! Thanks for asking!

https://goo.gl/photos/XbKYDRz5Vzcn9g3S8

https://goo.gl/photos/6CeYpvJqrCUdn7ez5

https://goo.gl/photos/2jcfqci7GcHTPyKMA
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Old 05-29-17, 03:16 AM
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looks good.. i had an 88 alpina pro and it rode real nice. enjoy it
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