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Storage Wars Find - Packed In Grease Duarte w/Campy Neovo Record Derailleurs, Frame

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Storage Wars Find - Packed In Grease Duarte w/Campy Neovo Record Derailleurs, Frame

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Old 11-06-18, 11:40 AM
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miamibeachcg
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Storage Wars Find - Packed In Grease Duarte w/Campy Neovo Record Derailleurs, Frame


I found this in a little Cuban thrift store here in Miami. They told me they found it in a storage unit they won at auction. They also told me that the derailleurs & other metal parts had been covered in grease & wrapped with saran wrap to protect them from rust (or our humidity?).
I asked what they wanted for it & the lady said she wasn't sure, but she would check & I could come back tomorrow. I didn't want to take a chance of losing it so I asked her if she would take $200 cash now, and she said "sure" - and we were both happy!
Now I just need to know what I have & that I made a good deal!
The derailleurs & shifters are Campagnolo Nuovo Record, the brakes are Shimano 600, and both front & rear forks are Brev Campagnolo. Also the rims' hubs are Campagnolo.
Is the frame Campagnolo?
What model is it?
What year is it?
There is a signature on the top tube by the seat - who/what is that?
What is it worth?
Finally, what is best way to remove the grease? (I'm thinking of taking it to a local bike shop & pau them to clean it)
Thanks all; I appreciate any help with this.








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Old 11-06-18, 11:42 AM
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Found edit & added pic above so I deleted photo here - sorry
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Old 11-06-18, 12:27 PM
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Google turns up a shop in Bogota, Colombia, but their web address is dead. IIRC, Duarte bikes were indeed made in/near Bogota and very highly regarded. I'd love to have a Colombian bike, but probably not many of them around in my size (61-64cm).

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Old 11-06-18, 12:45 PM
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This thread should be useful. What are the date codes on the back side of the crank and the rear derailleur? Looks well made, thought the bubbling of paint under the top of the seat stay is concerning. I have a feeling the components might be as valuable as the frame, since it's such an unknown builder.

I defer to others regarding the grease. You can be fairly aggressive with the alloy components, but on the paint and decals you might do some damage with a strong degreaser or too aggressive rubbing. Really depends on how dried out that grease is. I'd say proceed cautiously there.
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Old 11-06-18, 12:46 PM
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Wow, that chain is greasy, but perhaps a good thing for long term storage.

You have a pretty mixed groupset. Cranks are SR. Rear Derailleur is Nuovo Record. Front Derailleur is second generation Super Record (3 hole).

Pedals?

However, everything also appears to be well done.

Obviously you are short a wheelset, but otherwise $200 sounds like a decent deal for the parts + a "free frame".
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Old 11-06-18, 12:59 PM
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Also, the dropouts are Campagnolo, but the frame isn't. It's likely Columbus steel. Look inside the steerer tube (hold bike upside down, shine a flashlight into the hole between the forks). If you see 5 spiral ridges, it's Columbus SL or SLX.

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Old 11-06-18, 01:05 PM
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I have the wheels - they have campy hubs but no marks on the rims themselves
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Old 11-06-18, 01:24 PM
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Please stop typing your thread titles in all caps
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Old 11-06-18, 01:35 PM
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The frame itself is no earlier than 1985 per the palmares decals. This is consistent with the post-Portacatena Campagnolo 1010B dropouts. The crankset and rear derailleur look too old for the frame. The components that best match the the apparent age are the Shimano New 600EX calipers (1984-1987).

The frame has some nice finishing at the stay ends and thinned lugs. While it has Campagnolo dropouts, it lacks other features that I would expect on a high grade frame of the era, such as a front derailleur tab, bridge tangs, recesses for brake nuts etc. Given the age, my overall impression is a low mid-range frame with a higher than typical level of workmanship. In addition to checking the fork's steerer column for helical ridges, the seat post diameter may provide another clue to the tubeset brand and grade.
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Old 11-06-18, 07:00 PM
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I didn't see any spirals but didn't get a clear look. It's at bike shop being cleaned.
Speaking of old - the guy at the shop told me it has Campagnolo rims that the tube was glued? to the rim? (I can't remember what he called it, but they didn't have much of a edge around the rim; very low? Anyone know what kind I'm trying to say?
I'll post pic of all when I get it back
Thanks for the help!
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Old 11-06-18, 07:10 PM
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Here is part of the rim from pic I took with others above, but it didn't show the Campagnolo mark on the hub so I didn't post it - maybe you can tell what kind of rim it is from it?
Why the old rims, derailleurs & crank on a newer, handmade bike? That large crank was for racing, right?
Thanks again all
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Old 11-06-18, 11:06 PM
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Campagnolo Tipo hubs. Can't tell the rim maker from your photo, though. And I think the guy at the shop was trying to say it has tubular tires (tube sew inside tire casing) as opposed to clinchers (separate tube and tire).

These frames are not common and are pretty highly regarded. I love the details and wouldn't at all mind finding and riding one myself someday.

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Old 11-06-18, 11:22 PM
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Lugwork looks really good for just a mid level bike.....
I would love to have such a unique bike in my stable!
Much more interesting than the usual Euro C&V bikes that collectors fight over and pay big bucks for....
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Old 11-07-18, 02:06 AM
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Originally Posted by miamibeachcg View Post
It's at bike shop being cleaned.
Speaking of old - the guy at the shop told me it has Campagnolo rims that the tube was glued? to the rim? (I can't remember what he called it, but they didn't have much of a edge around the rim; very low? Anyone know what kind I'm trying to say?
Fixing up an old bike can be a money pit if you're paying someone else to do it, but a good mechanic can do nice work too. The other thing, is that a shop may not spend the time to buy quality era correct used replacement parts.

As far as the tires, there are two basic types of bicycle tires:
  • Clincher Tires (like car tires, bead hooks to sides of rim).
  • Tubular Tires (also called sewup tires). They GLUE to the rim.
    These were popular racing and performance riding tires form the 70's and 80's (or earlier). And, are still popular with racing.

For clincher tires, a few subtypes.
  • Normal Clincher Tires
  • Tubeless Tires (not to be confused with tublar).
    Tire seals to the rim, and no tube is needed.
  • Open Tubular. Not sure if that is just hype, or something unique. Designed to be supple tires with an outstanding ride.

Likewise, for tubular (glued) tires:
  • Sewups: Casing sewn at bottom. The proper way to fix a flat is to cut apart the tire, pull a section of tube out, patch, then sew back up
  • Integrated??? TUFO tires. The tube can't be separated from the casing.

Now, patching the old tubular tires was a pain. But, a few things have happened. More puncture resistant tires? Gatorskins?

Using sealants with the tubulars. Generally the same sealants as used with the tubeless. These can make permanent repairs, especially in the integrated TUFO style tires.

Now, for a "collector" bike, keep the tubulars.
For a daily rider, you might experiment with the tubulars, or convert to clinchers by either rebuilding the wheelset, or acquiring spares.
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Old 11-07-18, 08:52 AM
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To the OP,

I think one of the unspoken themes in this thread is that you have a very nice bike, you should learn more about it, find out what needs to be done to make it road-worthy and move ahead slowly with your decisions. You have a great item to learn from, many people here to help you along and it could be a great journey to understanding more about your bike and what you have there.
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Old 11-08-18, 05:35 AM
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I spoke with someone who has a few of these - and who knows Mr. Duarte's wife! Here is what he said I had (Plus photo of bike at shop with rims on - which the man who wrote me below later told me (after seeing pics below) they are campagnolo nuovo tipo high flange hubs
Bike Info
Regarding the bike, is definitely an early Duarte. Mr Duarte acquired a pantograph later and that’s the reason why the early ones does not have any engravings. I assume that you have a “Tour del’Avenir” model which was an entry level bike, also the mix of parts was very common in those bikes. I’m worried about the rusted parts (pic attached), I have had bad experiences with that model. I’ve called mr. Duarte’s wife and she told me that the bike is around 1983-85.

Thank you all for the help!


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Old 11-08-18, 06:16 PM
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i'd buy it for 200$, no problem. You did okay.
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