Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals. Use this subforum for all requests as to "How much is this vintage bike worth?"Do NOT try to sell it in here, use the Marketplaces.

CCM Corsa 10 Speed

Old 04-04-19, 01:22 PM
  #1  
jordanpeter
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
CCM Corsa 10 Speed

Hello everyone!

For the last week now I have been shopping around on Kijiji while using bike forums.net and Google for the majority of my research. Iím 25 years old, 6í1Ē and looking for a bike to commute to work and back. Iím hoping to spend under $200 preferably $150. This is the first break Iíve found that I can tell is both a quality product and a good fit for me. What Iím wondering is if somebody can tell me by the configuration and quality pictures if it is a worthwhile purchase.
jordanpeter is offline  
Old 04-04-19, 02:42 PM
  #2  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 17,541
Mentioned: 408 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2369 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Welcome to the forums. The subject bicycle is a 1981 Corsa. This is an entry level model with a hi-tensile steel frame and rims. In most Canadian markets it would sell for $50-$75 CDN. Irregardless of the level and aggressive pricing, this bicycle is not appropriate for you. The frame is 21", which is far too small for someone 6'-1". You should be looking for a frame in the 23"-25" range. Good luck.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 04-04-19, 04:08 PM
  #3  
jordanpeter
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thank you very much for the information T-Mar. I will keep on the look out. Are there any specmajor names, brands, or models that I should be keeping an eye out for? Also, any other information and advice relevant to commuter biking for beginners is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance. Jordan
jordanpeter is offline  
Old 04-05-19, 05:26 AM
  #4  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 17,541
Mentioned: 408 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2369 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Brand names are somewhat irrelevant, as most manufacturers offered a full range of models from entry level to high end and, in the end, the critical factor is how well the bicycle was maintained. However, you may want to consider expanding you search to include ATBs/MTBs, They can make excellent commuters when the knobby tyres are replaced with quieter and easier rolling.road tyres. Compared to traditional road bicycles, they offer the advantages of a more upright riding position for better visibility, wider and heavier tyres for more comfort and puncture resistance, wider range gearing and they typically have fittings to accommodate racks and fenders, which some road bicycles may not have. However, be aware that for a given height of rider, ATBs frames are sized significantly smaller due to the longer seat posts and riser stems which place the handlebars in higher position. ATB frames rarely go over 22", which is considered to be about equivalent to a 25" road frame.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 04-05-19, 11:30 AM
  #5  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 21,867

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 65 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 606 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Look for higher quality, not brand or model. On the bike above, claw RD hanger, steel chain rings, stem shifters, steel rear rim, nutted axles, turkey levers, no lever hoods, all typical signs of low, low end. Probably has steel handlebars and seat post too.

Commuting for beginners? A rigid frame MTB can make a fine choice.


Most of the well known vintage brands made a full line of bikes, from really low end to top of the line. And of course, they sold a lot more of the low end bikes, so there are more of those out there today. Being able to spot the difference is key to making a better decision. And on older bikes, they typically require maintenance work, which can easily consume your budget. People rarely maintain their bikes. And some resellers do less than complete jobs of refurbishing bikes they sell. Its not unusual to see the easy cosmetic stuff done (like the bike above) while the stuff you can't see is ignored. Being able to spot the difference is important.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 04-05-19, 12:27 PM
  #6  
Dave Mayer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,766
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 574 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
My first bike was a 60's CCM. It turned me off riding for years. One of the most satisfying moments of my young life was to huck that POS off of a railway bridge into the local river. No regrets.

I've been bike commuting for 20 years now. Here is what you should want to start out within your price range:

- A rigid frame mountain bike from the 80s. That is, no suspension fork or rear end. Suspension adds pounds of useless weight, and energy-sapping suspension bob. Plus rigid forks feature better steering and handling than suspension forks.

- Alu rims - obviously. Steel rims are heavy, fragile and terrifyingly useless in wet conditions.

- No kickstand. This seems arbitrary, but one of the most reliable laws of the universe is that bikes that come stock with Kickstand's are low-end junk. I've assessed and repaired hundreds of bikes in my time, and I've only ever seen a single exception to this rule, where someone rigged a kickstand onto a Pinarello. Sad sad sad....

- Slick high-pressure tires. Knobby tires are useless on the road. They slow you down by several Mph, and feature poor traction on asphalt.
Dave Mayer is offline  
Old 04-07-19, 11:39 AM
  #7  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 9,034

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, 1969 Atala Professional, 1970 Torpado Luxe, 1973 Peugeot PX10E, 1978 Norco Magnum SE, 1982 Bianchi Touring, 2000 Cyclops

Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 548 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Look for higher quality, not brand or model.
Great advice wrk101 and for those who do not understand what constitutes better quality in a vintage road bicycle, feel free to have a look at Bicycle Quality and you should come up to decision making speed pretty quickly. Hope it is a help.
__________________
Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"
randyjawa is offline  
Old 04-08-19, 08:32 AM
  #8  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 21,867

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 65 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 606 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Yes, I am glad Randy waded in as I was going to recommend his site. Get knowledge or get taken.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 04-08-19, 04:11 PM
  #9  
ramzilla
Senior Member
 
ramzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: 1/2 Atlanta GA 1/2 Fernandina FL
Posts: 2,397

Bikes: Vintage Japanese Bicycles

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 382 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
CCM bikes have a sort of fan base that drives up the price higher than it should be. The best deals on 80's vintage bikes are the high value low price items like Fuji or the Kuwahara built Raleighs or Schwinns that were made in Japan. Look for Shogun, Takara, Miyata, Panasonic, Sekai etc., etc., etc...........................Me love some Japanese steel. 1/3 the price of vintage Italian and equal or better in quality. Yay!
ramzilla is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 09:52 PM
  #10  
Hummer
Senior Member
 
Hummer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Rupert's Land
Posts: 810

Bikes: 1981 Raleigh GP, 1985 Norco Bush Pilot, . . .

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ramzilla View Post
. . . or the Kuwahara built Raleighs . . .
I have never seen a Raleigh that had a frame made by Kuwahara. Do you have an example?
Hummer is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 05:15 AM
  #11  
kross57 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: north NJ
Posts: 254

Bikes: Miyata 710, Team Fuji, Schwinn World Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just to voice a different opinion, there is decent quality (meaning it will last and work properly) and there is, well, fluff. Stem shifters often function just as smoothly as down-tube levers. Quick release rims aren't necessary, although alloy rims are to be desired. A few extra pounds is no biggie. You want everything to function as it should, and the bike should fit well and be a pleasure to ride. Personally, I would not own a bike without a kickstand and safety levers. You want what you want, and you can afford what you can afford. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. You should be able to find what you are looking for within your budget. Best of luck with your search.
kross57 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.