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Motobecane Jubilee Sport

Old 04-18-19, 06:36 AM
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bikeboy100
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Motobecane Jubilee Sport

Sorry if this is the wrong place for this. Please move it if necessary. I was looking at a Motobecane Jubilee Sport (didn't take any pictures). It was at a Bike Collective and they are firm at $150. It is medium blue with a darker blue headtube. It is a 23" frame and fits me. It has downtube shifters. It looks like all it needs is a good cleaning and to put some miles on it. Might not even need tires. I'm mainly here looking for people's opinions on this brand and model. I know nothing about them. I'm going to be doing a 71 mile trail ride this June and looking for a lighter bike with more hears than my old heavy three speeds. Thanks for your impute and time.
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Old 04-18-19, 09:06 AM
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The one I had (1984?) was beige with the blue head tube, blue saddle and cabling. It had the internally brazed lugs (inexternal?) and was nicely finished, with top tube internally routed rear brake cable. Full chrome fork. SunTour ARx derailleurs with the central command shifters. Weinman side pulls, if I recall correctly. The handlebar wrap was the molded rubber (sort of a faux leather with faux stitching) with fully integrated brake hoods.

Overall, the bike had a pretty lively ride, and was just one size to large for me to keep. Good bike. If they have serviced it at all, and it fits you, then it is well worth the $150.
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Old 04-18-19, 09:28 AM
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I bet that is about the same year. It had the blue faux leather wrap and fully chromed fork. I'm just wanting to make sure I'm not buying junk if I get it because I am not familiar with the name. Would it be comfortable on a long ride?
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Old 04-18-19, 09:58 AM
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Here is a catalog to peruse. These were lovely bikes, built towards the end of the line for Motobecane in France. All variants of the Jubilee were quality bikes built with nice tubing. $150 is a steal for this one, and I suspect you will find it rides beautifully on paved surfaces. In the '83 catalog they describe it as suited for recreation, touring or sport. The '84 catalog talks about serious riders and triathletes - but this was back when triathlon bikes were essentially racing machines designed to be comfortable for long days in the saddle.
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Old 04-18-19, 10:04 AM
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Bikeboy, the French manufacturers knew how to make bikes that had a nice ride. I have had several low end French bikes including a Motobécane Nomade and Mirage, and a Moto-made Astra. With aluminum rims they all had a pleasant ride. The Jubile Sport is a higher-Range bike and should be very nice for longer rides.
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Old 04-18-19, 10:10 AM
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It's certainly not junk. And there is no reason why this bike can't be comfortable. It has a sport geometry.

What has the seller said about condition? Have the bearings been serviced? Those are things that you'll need to look at. Is there wear on the chainrings? Has the chain been replaced?

What about tires? These were spec'd with 27 x 1" tires. Have they been replaced, or do you have 35 year old tires on there? If original, the seller should discount because of that. A 27 1 1/8" Panaracer Pasela would be a more comfortable upgrade.

I'd have no reservations about taking this bike on long rides, personally. It has to fit you. 23" frame? How tall are you?
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Old 04-18-19, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
It's certainly not junk. And there is no reason why this bike can't be comfortable. It has a sport geometry.

What has the seller said about condition? Have the bearings been serviced? Those are things that you'll need to look at. Is there wear on the chainrings? Has the chain been replaced?

What about tires? These were spec'd with 27 x 1" tires. Have they been replaced, or do you have 35 year old tires on there? If original, the seller should discount because of that. A 27 1 1/8" Panaracer Pasela would be a more comfortable upgrade.

I'd have no reservations about taking this bike on long rides, personally. It has to fit you. 23" frame? How tall are you?
I'll have to check on all those things. The tires look nearly new. I'm right at 6' tall. The bike is a 23". Oddly enough I have felt more comfortable on a friend's Motobecane that is shorter. I can't figure it out.....I need a 23" frame so I can have my legs extended properly, but then it feels like I'm putting too much weight on my hands. On a shorter frame I feel like my legs are bunched up and it's a struggle to pedal, but it just feels like the upper half of the bike fits me like a glove. Frustrating.
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Old 04-18-19, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by bikeboy100 View Post
I'll have to check on all those things. The tires look nearly new. I'm right at 6' tall. The bike is a 23". Oddly enough I have felt more comfortable on a friend's Motobecane that is shorter. I can't figure it out.....I need a 23" frame so I can have my legs extended properly, but then it feels like I'm putting too much weight on my hands. On a shorter frame I feel like my legs are bunched up and it's a struggle to pedal, but it just feels like the upper half of the bike fits me like a glove. Frustrating.
If the frame height fits, then try raising the bars or shortening the stem. Rotating the bars so that the ramps are flat also helps. Like on my Motobécane Grand Jubile:


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Old 04-18-19, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post

If the frame height fits, then try raising the bars or shortening the stem. Rotating the bars so that the ramps are flat also helps. Like on my Motobécane Grand Jubile:


Nice bike! I assume shortening the stem is bringing the handlebars closer to me? That would work somewhat like moving the saddle forward?
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Old 04-18-19, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by bikeboy100 View Post
That would work somewhat like moving the saddle forward?
You set the saddle position first, to get your knees and upper leg in the right relationship to the crank and pedal. Traditionally, saddle position (fore and aft) is not adjusted to fit the length of the top tube + stem. It's the other way around. Set the saddle for efficient pedaling (for you), and then adjust the stem to move the handlebars where you need them on a particular frame.

If you're 6' and of normal proportions, then 23" is a good starting point for you. If you feel like you're falling forward onto your hands, maybe your saddle is too far forward, beyond the balance point for your legs and the crankset. You should feel balanced when riding, neither too far behind the cranks nor falling forward of them, when riding under load.
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Old 04-18-19, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by bikeboy100 View Post
Nice bike! I assume shortening the stem is bringing the handlebars closer to me? That would work somewhat like moving the saddle forward?
Yes, exactly. But as Phil says above, the saddle placement should not be used to adjust for a comfortable reach.
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Old 04-18-19, 07:15 PM
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Originally Posted by bikeboy100 View Post
I'm just wanting to make sure I'm not buying junk if I get it because I am not familiar with the name.
Motobecane really knew how to make bikes! The French Motobecanes are great riding bikes, and were a very good value. The paint jobs on some their bikes were truly top-notch! Tres magnifique!
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