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Bianchi Nuova Racing 12v

Old 07-29-19, 04:44 PM
  #1  
TropicWind
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Bianchi Nuova Racing 12v

Back with another Bianchi! Appears to be a late 70’s Bianchi Nuova Racing 12v. I say 70’s based on the “Bianchi” logo cutout on top of front front stems vs the “B” that seems to be on the 80’s models but I could be wrong.

This bike was purchased in 86 by the current owner and who still has the original manual and receipts. It was ridden for a few triathlons and the owner maintains that there is no major rust and only some “pintip” paint chips along the tubes. The bike has been stored in the basement for its life.

Looking at the components it appears to have Campagnolo Nuovo Record derailleurs, Bianchi inscribed cranks, Universal Mod 77 breaks and the original Mavic rims. The frame is a Tretubi (Columbus SL?). I haven’t asked about the break handles but I suspect they are originals. One thing I noticed is that the brake handles seem to be missing the hoods although the picture is blurry so it's hard to tell.

I currently have a ~’79 Miyata 912 with Shimano Arabesque components and Tange Champion tubing that is in great shape. I would like to add this Bianchi as the second bike in my collection and am curious as to how it compares to the Miyata as I would like to add a slightly better bike. Also, it would be great if anyone can tell if any of the pictures suggest any major component issues other than cleaning and some standard tune up work.

The seller has agreed to $350 which based on my research here seems to be in the middle of what @Bianchigirll has said is fair for other similar models ($300-$400). I thought to ask again as I appreciate that markets change and every bike is different.

Assuming this is a fair deal and a bike worth getting, are there any components that would be worth replacing with better period correct components? Perhaps the campagnolo super record breaks and cranks? Would also love to add a pantographed Bianchi seat steam and quill stem but I may be getting ahead of myself.


Thanks again for everyone’s help, this community has been tremendous to learn from.











Last edited by TropicWind; 07-30-19 at 12:21 PM. Reason: picture order
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Old 07-29-19, 05:12 PM
  #2  
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The Nuovo Racing 12v model is more like ‘83 or 84 model. $300ish would be a good deal for that but it needs a ton of elbow grease.

Update; BTW where are you and these bikes? Looking at the US catalogs it does indeed appear to be an '83 Nuovo Racing 12, the Campi derailleurs, Ofmega crank, Universal brakes, Ofmega HS......

If it fits it is a OK buy. Can you do the work to have this cleaned and overhauled? Your looking at around $100+ /-, hopefully the cables can be reused.

I wouldn't upgrade anything right away except maybe some better brakes blocks, just get the bike cleaned and serviced and ride for a while before worrying about changing anything.
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Bianchis '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, '93 Reparto Corse SBX

Others but still loved; '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape SLX Bertoni "Speckled Trout"

Last edited by Bianchigirll; 07-29-19 at 05:24 PM.
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Old 07-29-19, 05:31 PM
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WThanks for the confirmation! I’ll need to brush up on how to properly clean and tune a bike as this will be my first go at it! I would like to get my hands dirty and use this as a means by which to learn but may need to lean on a shop if I get stuck while going through YouTube instructions. I suspect I’ll use their services for truing services and other things I won’t have the tools for. Would Pasela tires be appropriate for this bike?

EDIT:
I am located in the United States, I reside in upstate NY.

Also, any idea how this frame/group compares to a Miyata 912 with Shimano Arabesque components and a Tange Champion frame? Curious if this is on the same level or considered a better bike. I’ll be riding both quite enthusiastically!

Last edited by TropicWind; 07-29-19 at 07:43 PM.
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Old 07-29-19, 05:50 PM
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You will enjoy riding the Bianchi because it is Celeste. I can't comment on the Miyata as every one I have ridden was much later, (late 80's) but the top models did ride very well. I had this Bianchi just like yours 9 years ago. It was a fun bike but 1 size too small for me. IMO the Bianchi is an upgrade in general over the 912. You can't have too many bikes unless you run out of space then you get a storage unit. Right?

d

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Old 07-29-19, 06:11 PM
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@tmh657 that is a beauty! Am looking forward to getting it back in shape so that it hopefully looks as good as the one you had!

This is indeed a seemingly dangerous hobby and one which may certainly merit a storage unit if it continues to wreak havoc on my self control!
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Old 07-30-19, 01:50 AM
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Pasela tires would be great on that.
700x25 Pasela Tourguard tires are my favorite.
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Bianchis '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, '93 Reparto Corse SBX

Others but still loved; '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape SLX Bertoni "Speckled Trout"
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Old 07-30-19, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by TropicWind View Post
Also, any idea how this frame/group compares to a Miyata 912 with Shimano Arabesque components and a Tange Champion frame? Curious if this is on the same level or considered a better bike. I’ll be riding both quite enthusiastically!
IMO the 912 is a better frame with cheaper parts. The Bianchi was a Italian budget race entry model with nominally better European parts. I would guess the price point close bitd with the Bianchi over valued, and good value on the Miyata due to the currency exchange rates of the time.
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Old 07-30-19, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by tmh657 View Post
You will enjoy riding the Bianchi because it is Celeste. I can't comment on the Miyata as every one I have ridden was much later, (late 80's) but the top models did ride very well. I had this Bianchi just like yours 9 years ago. It was a fun bike but 1 size too small for me. IMO the Bianchi is an upgrade in general over the 912. You can't have too many bikes unless you run out of space then you get a storage unit. Right?

d
If you don't have ample storage going in, the unit should be a given.
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Old 07-30-19, 03:35 PM
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I'm not sure the frame would be much of a (any) upgrade. Should probably have a wider rear triangle if that matters to you. Celeste may or may not matter to you.
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Old 07-31-19, 05:09 AM
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+1, the subject bicycle is a 1983 model. Regarding this bicycle versus a Miyata 912, I wouldn't say this is better. It certainly carries more street credibility for the average cyclist due to the Bianchi name, Columbus main tubes and colour but when you get down to brass tacks, the differences are relatively minor. Typically the Miyata will have better workmanship and finish. Assuming the Miyata actually is a 1979, the Bianchi will be slightly lighter and more responsive, primarily due to the 700C wheelset, though not all owners would be able to detect the difference. While the Bianchi has the prestigious Campagnolo Nuovo Record rear derailleur, it won't shift as well as the Shimano 600EX. Also, while the Bianchi has an extra cog on the back, the gear range is narrower and less useful for the average cyclist. The remaining components on the Bianchi are 2nd tier and I wouldn't rank them any better than Shimano 600EX.
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Old 07-31-19, 09:46 PM
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Thanks for the response @T-Mar -

Two additional questions if you don’t mind - the “Bianchi” cutout on the top of the front fork does not seem to match the US catalog shots for the Nuovo Racing models for that time. It also seems to have a metal Bianchi emblem on the front rather than the usual decal. It of course has the Nuovo Racing 12v decal but these other traits seem to line up with the Rekord 848 rather than the Nuovo Racing line. It seems awfully similar to the bike found in this thread but the components suggest otherwise Bianchi Rekord 848

Is it possible this is a non-US Nuovo Racing model?

For the second question, which admittedly is a bit of a deviation from this thread (apologies there) - would it require a large jump in terms of frame quality, weight, components, etc. to find a bike that would feel noticeably more responsive and “quicker” than the Miyata 912/Nuovo or would it mostly be small incremental differences between these and say the top end steel frame kits of the time? Am mostly curious if there are any models that you would recommend chasing where the power transfer would make for a noticeable difference in terms of perceived “quickness”

Thanks!
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Old 08-01-19, 02:57 PM
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FWIW, yes I have seen that crown on other Bianchi designated as Nuovo Racing models but I can't recall seeing that head badge on them.

Like most products, bicycles are subject to the concept of diminishing returns. As you move progressively up the levels, the cost increments increase as the performance gains get smaller. Lighter frames will accelerate quicker but there comes a point where a frame become too light and it becomes too flexible which bother decreases power transfer and control during power transfer. It can also adversely affect other characteristics. Obviously, there is a sweet spot but this sweet spot varies depending on the amount of power a rider can generate and their sensitivity to the changes. . If you're not a very powerful rider you may be able to tolerate a much lighter frame. However, if you're a very powerful rider, going to a lighter frame may prove detrimental.

If you like a bicycle that jumps to pedal input, I suggest you put less emphasis on the frame and focus on the wheels. Rotating weight has a bigger impact on inertia. Consequently, lighter rims and tyres are where cyclists focus, with tubulars being the system of choice where performance is the priority. If you have sufficient brake pad adjustment I suggest you swap wheels between the Bianchi and Miyata. If the Miyata really is a 1979 model it should have heavier, slightly larger, 27" rims and tyres. The difference should be readily noticeable. If it's not , then I wouldn't be considering any wheel upgrades.
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Old 08-01-19, 05:11 PM
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...just to add to what has already been stated: if you buy this, you can make the rear derailleur shift more positively by replacing the cable housing with something more modern, like Jagwire plastic lined housing. I usually replace all the cabling and housing on a new to me used bike anyway, as it costs little and usually improves shifting performance. Likewise, you can get a pretty good KMC 8.93 chain for maybe ten bucks online that is still on the bike.

I have one of those tres tubi Bianchi bikes, a Nuovo Allero, that was pretty good value for what they charged for them. It's not as light as the full Columbus Giro I bought a couple of years ago, but with the wheel upgrades you can do with today's rims and tyres, you can make it go pretty fast (if that's what you want to do). There will, of course, be a different "road feel" between this and your Miyata. You might enjoy that, or you might just experience it as educational.
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