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Schwinn Suburban what year?

Old 08-13-19, 11:55 AM
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RidesaJapanese
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Schwinn Suburban what year?



Schwinn Suburban sn is EN510423 anyone know what year? $10 at a flea market very good shape all intact.
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Old 08-13-19, 12:13 PM
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-----

Our resident Schwinn expert @Metacortex hath writ that the serials were oft stamped in years ahead so cannot be relied upon to yield actual model years.

The bicycle's stikshift levers began in 1967 so it is unlikely to be earlier.

The reflectors appear aftermarket so it likely predates implementation of CPSC regulations.

Unfortunately, your image is of non-driveside which limits the information it provides to readers.

The backside of the Weinmann model 730 brake calipers may show a date in the form of a clockface device.

Huret began date marking their products in 1978 but cycle clearly earlier so no help there.

You should be able to narrow down date closely by looking at the Schwinn manufacturer catalogues posted here.

Suggest beginning ~1970-72 -

Schwinn catalogs, 1961 - 1970

Schwinn catalogs, 1971 - 1980

-----
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Old 08-13-19, 12:59 PM
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EN = May 1977


As per the mid sixties and later, Chicago built electroforged Schwinns all have TWO LETTERS and number.

THE 2nd LETTER is the YEAR.

The 1st LETTER denotes the MONTH



(THE LETTERS I and O are skipped BECAUSE THEY LOOK TOO MUCH LIKE one AND zero )



*****SECOND LETTER:
N= 1977
M=1976
L=1975
K=1974
J=1973
H=1972
G=1971
F=1970

THE SCHWINN SUBURBAN arrived in 1970.



---------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------
For other Schwinn models, if you have the Second Letter of the Two Letters being :
E=1969
D=1968
C=1967
B=1966
A=1965

--------------------------------------------
1971 HAS THE SCHWINN SERIAL NUMBER ON THE HEAD TUBE, NEAR THE SCHWINN BADGE.
Sixties and '70 have the SCHWINN SERIAL NUMBER AT REAR FRAME NEAR THE DROP OUT.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


you understand that the letters ( I ) and ( O ) are not used.
1st Letter denotes MONTH ......... A = Jan B = Feb C= March ........and so on......
2nd Letter denotes YEAR

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Old 08-13-19, 01:41 PM
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Your SERIAL # EN510423 (May 1977 SUBURBAN ten speed) should have the new Shimano FFS (forward freewheel system) on the one-piece Ashtabula crank.

What is interesting is that for some color choices (SKY BLUE) Schwinn chose to keep the Traditional Style DECAL, where in other colors, you have that "MODERN-NEW" style on some colors.

Schwinn Lightweight Data Book (Detail 1975-1979)


1975
https://waterfordbikes.com/SchwinnCa...0/1975_15.html


1976
https://waterfordbikes.com/SchwinnCa...0/1976_15.html


1977
https://waterfordbikes.org/SchwinnCa...0/1977_10.html




-----------------------------------------
I believe that those REFLECTORS that are there on your bike are correct. Schwinn built it with those at that time.
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Old 08-13-19, 07:05 PM
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I believe that is a 1974 Suburban and that the OP has mis-read the serial. There are several clues: The color is Opaque Blue, which was last used in '74. The forged steel stem is also a type that was last used in mid-'74. The shifters are a type that was used starting in mid-'73. Finally the reflectors are of a type that Schwinn dealers were installing in '75, which would be correct for a '74 model that sat around in the showroom for a while before being sold. Also, '76 and later models would have a 4-digit date code stamped in the headbadge.

Please post clear close-up pics of the serial no. and the headbadge. The hubs should also have date code stamps so post pics of those as well and we can offer more information.

Last edited by Metacortex; 08-13-19 at 07:10 PM.
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Old 08-13-19, 07:20 PM
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Beautiful bike. They built those things to last. That bike is so tough you could probably get drunk and back that Ford pickup truck over it and, it wouldn't even scratch the fenders. When the planet explodes that thing will be floating around deep space for an eternity. First bike in history that had a dual use feature. You could try to ride it all the way around the block. Or, you could use it for a boat anchor. Oh yeah...... If I was going to restore that thing I would soak all the parts in gasoline while smoking Camel non filter cigarettes. KABOOM!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 08-13-19, 07:22 PM
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Sorry about that. Something about Suburbans just triggers weird things with me. Be good. Have fun.
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Old 08-13-19, 07:24 PM
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I would shoot for around $100 for that.
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Old 08-13-19, 08:42 PM
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Stock 77 with optional large bars and safety package nice basic bike a bit heavy but should should make a nice rider pretty as is with a little clean up and lub.
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Old 08-17-19, 08:00 AM
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My guess is 1971 or 1972 bike boom era Schwinn
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Old 08-25-19, 03:25 PM
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Does anyone here have knowledge on if its possible to upgrade an 1975 Schwinn suburban to index shifting? It currently uses a lever system.
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Old 08-25-19, 03:41 PM
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You need to measure the OLD distance of the rear dropouts. If it's around 130mm you might be able to thread a 7 speed freewheel on there. Slap some grip shifters on it.
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Old 08-25-19, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by ramzilla View Post
You need to measure the OLD distance of the rear dropouts. If it's around 130mm you might be able to thread a 7 speed freewheel on there. Slap some grip shifters on it.
What is a rear dropout?
The actual bug wheel behind the cogs themselves?

I'm mechanically savvy. But I've never nodded a bike before

Thank you
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Old 08-25-19, 06:36 PM
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Rear wheel axle OLD = outside locknut distance. The amount of space between the flanges (dropouts) that the wheel axle locknuts fit into. Old 5 speed set ups are about 120mm. 6 speeds about 126mm. 7 speed to 10 speed around 130mm. You can't do much with the old 5 speed spacing. 6 speed spacing can usually be increased by the 4mm necessary to handle a 7 speed cog. I've changed a few old 6 speed friction system to 7 speed indexed set ups. Sometimes just a couple of 2mm washers. Sometimes a longer axle. Always have to spread the dropouts a little.
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Old 08-25-19, 10:50 PM
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So if I understand, you're saying expand the rear axle. But I can keep the old cogs right? Should I keep the same shifter cables? What does a freewheel do? Should I keep the same chain?
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Old 08-26-19, 11:43 AM
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Not really worth upgrading to index IMHO.. It can be done the easiest way is likely to go with a Shimano 6speed freewheel, rear DR , 6 speed thumb shifters and modern index chain, then add a couple of mm of spacers on each side of the rear axel. Yet you may have issues getting the chain to engage work well with the one piece crank and slightly wider than modern steel chainrings. Your best option for this will likely be to see if there is a friendly bike coop near you which should have the parts and be able to help you figure stuff out.
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Old 08-26-19, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Pernlundell4 View Post
So if I understand, you're saying expand the rear axle. But I can keep the old cogs right? Should I keep the same shifter cables? What does a freewheel do? Should I keep the same chain?
I get the feeling this is a big challenge for you. Unless you're a big DIYer that's comfortable wrenching on drivetrains and into customizing vintage bikes, It's really not going to be worth it. You can easily find a newer used bike with the features you want for less than it would cost to convert the Suburban.
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Old 08-28-19, 11:04 AM
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I enjoyed the responses on here, so here's another picture. Although I often luck into cheap bikes here in the Midwest, the market for them seems poor.
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Old 08-28-19, 02:26 PM
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If that was mine I'd clean it up and leave it as-is. Get a dropper bottle. Fill it with diesel fuel. Place drops of diesel on all the pivot points, cables, rusty spots etc. Tune it up and ride it.
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Old 08-28-19, 11:20 PM
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Definitely looks like a 70s bike
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Old 08-29-19, 12:32 AM
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The most recent photos of RidesaJapanese's Blue 10 speed SUBURBAN does confirm Metacortex's suspicion that it is a 1974 and that RidesaJapanese simply mistakenly listed EN 510423 as the serial when it likely actually is EK 510423. It does not have the Shimano FFS that a 1977 model would have. You can clearly see that from the latest picture.

If it were my bicycle, I would get rid of that Huret Alvit SCHWINN APPROVED REAR DERAILLEUR that came on ten speed Varsity/Continental and ten speed Suburban models. REPLACE IT WITH A SHIMANO EAGLE or SHIMANO SKYLARK or THE GT-120 from the '74-'77 Collegiate 5 speed/Suburban 5 speed, - OR- the GT-100 from the '70 -'73 Collegiate 5 speed/Sububurban 5 speed, -OR- a NOS(new old stock) SUNTOUR rear derailleur from the seventies.
Whether it is an OLD SCHWINN or an OLD RALEIGH or whatever it is, IF IT HAS A HURET or SIMPLEX or even that Italian C - word that the fools love so much, it gets replaced by superior Japanese equipment. If you have a vintage bike that is worth serious dough such that inferior originality will be better for market value, then keep it stock, but if not, you should say these words: JAPAN = great and Europe = no good.


Pernlundell4: I don't see any advancement that you will gain from Index shifting on your 1975 SUBURBAN.
The SUBURBAN five speed with the SHIMANO built GT-120 is bullet proof and shifts consistantly decent. The Schwinn Stem Shifter is one of the best stem shifters in my opinion. Like I mentioned before, if you have the TEN SPEED Suburban then it has the INFERIOR Huret Schwinn Approved Rear derailleur that I personally would REPLACE with a Shimano Eagle, Shimano Skylark, GT-120, GT-100 or a SUNTOUR rear derailleur.
The Five speed SUBURBAN also has a better FREEWHEEL than the ten speed Suburban/Varsity/continental has.
The Model J is superior in quality to the Model F freewheel, although the Model F freewheel is very good.
The Low Gearing (hill climbing ability) is Superior in the Model J freewheel.
The Model J has a 32 TEETH first gear. The Model F has a 28 TEETH first gear.
Model J has 32, 26, 21, 17, 14
Model F has 28, 24, 20, 16, 14

Nothing is wrong with Friction shifting.
It is incredibly simple to set up a Shimano Eagle, Shimano Skylark, or shimano built GT-120 Schwinn Approved rear derailleur since they all have the high and low Limit screws in the typical shimano location. The 1970 Collegiate 5 speed and 1970 Suburban 5 speed were about the first bicycles other than Japanese bicycles to feature Shimano built rear derailleurs. Shimano wiped out the Europeans by 1977 because their quality was twice as good and at half the price. Shimano Eagle was found on hundreds of thousands of inexpensive Kmart and no-name Japanese import ten speeds of the 1972 to 1977 era. Yes it was their low line derailleur but the only difference is that it is heavier and has a massive bash guard to protect it. Yes, that extra weight isn't something racers want but the durability and the operational quality cannot be beat. Go see what Mr Brown thought of the Shimano Eagle. (see sheldon brown website...).
Yep, all those kmart ten speeds came with Shimano Eagle rear derailleurs, and they put to shame every one of those Alvit rear derailleurs that were seen on all those Raleigh ten speeds before 1977, and the Varsity/Continental and Suburban ten speeds of the seventies and before.
I would not waste my time and money trying to convert a 1975 SUBURBAN to index shifting. The Schwinn stik on the stem does the job adequately.
So don't think Hooray for Huret, think wastebasket, rubbish bin for Huret rear derailleurs, and just go with Japanese superiority.
It is easy to swap to a Shimano rear derailleur or a Suntour, so why ride something that is not nearly as good. Yes, the Huret rear derailleur is functional and dependable enough but compared to the Shimano product or Maeda SUNTOUR rear derailleurs, it is 2nd rate by a country mile.
The SUBURBAN is a really decent bicycle if you are of the mindset of stay thin, ride a Schwinn.......the extra weight will do you some good.
The basic Electroforged SCHWINN bicycles with five or more gears of the SEVENTIES that are outstanding in stock configuration are the FIVE SPEED Collegiate, the FIVE SPEED SUBURBAN, and the SPORTABOUT ten speed ( circa '77-'78 essentially a SUNTOUR equipped Varsity) and the RUNABOUT (circa '77-'78 essentially a SUNTOUR equipped Tourist Style Varsity/Suburban ten speed).
IF YOU WANT A FANCIER SUBURBAN, THEN PERHAPS FIND A 1977 and later model with the FFS.
Enjoy the Suburban.
Schwinns from Chicago are not everybody's favorites but they have certain characteristics which make them among the most durable bicycles ever made. Significant weight is a byproduct of the strength and durability of all its components. Weight is not a bad thing if you aren't racing, or climbing very steep hills.
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Old 08-31-19, 06:20 PM
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Looking like I did misread the SN. I do agree about not doing anything to it other than cleaning and a basic tuning up.
y
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Old 09-01-19, 06:39 AM
  #23  
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People who are not serious Schwinn nutcases might not realize that the SCHWINN SUBURBAN has the Lighter Tubular Front Fork (same one as seen on the CONTINENTAL ). This Tubular Front Fork is SEEN in post #22 8-31-19 5:20 by RidesAJapanese, and also in post#1 8-13-19 10:55.
This Schwinn Tubular Front Fork (Suburban & Continental) weighs considerably less than the Ashtabula forged blade Front Fork that the Varsity and the other Schwinn "lightweight" electroforged-HEAVIES have.
The first thing you may notice is though the SUBURBAN'S Front Fork is the same as the Continental, the Brakes are the Exact same Side Pulls that are seen on the Varsity. The Suburban has the Side Pulls of the Varsity and the Front Fork of the Continental. The Continental has CENTER PULL brakes if you aren't into old Schwinns.
The Suburban has the same heavy forged steel stem as the Varsity and the other common "lightweight" Chicago heavies of the seventies to the Chicago end.
The Continental has a lightweight alloy stem. The handlebars on the Suburban are the typical approx 23" wide North Road bars seen on Schwinns of at least the mid sixties to the Chicago end. Good design and shape and great chrome like most all Schwinn chrome a decade after WWII and beyond until the Chicago end. It cleans up nicely except when seriously rusted. The Suburban has what most folks refer to as ugly duckling painted fenders compared to the Chrome Fenders that were found on the '69 Varsity Tourist (last year before being phased out, replaced by Suburban in the line-up). Chrome 27" fenders were Optional Accessories for the Varsity and other 630mm (27") wheel lightweights in the seventies.
The SUBURBAN traditionally with its very conservative graphics and decal colors for the "Traditional" graphic scheme years, tend to fade into the paint color on some SUBURBAN colors of 1970 through 1976 that have the "Traditional" Schwinn graphics/logo. An example is the 1971 Brown Color and the 1972 Green Color has a coordinating off gold that over time just is not seen, unless your eyes are within four inches of the bicycle. Due to the conservative, muted color scheme choices that Schwinn decided upon for most of the pre-1977 SUBURBANS, the decals and graphics DO NOT LOOK NEARLY AS GOOD AS SAY THE AVERAGE EQUALLY WEATHERBEATEN Collegiate, Varsity, Continental, Super Sport, Breeze, Speedster, Fair Lady, or Sting Ray etc, of the same era.
These 1970 - 1976 SUBURBANS tend to look good only when their decals are clean + intact and not yet faded, ghostlike into the paint.
The Later 1977 era "Modern" SCHWINN graphics/logo tends to look great on the SUBURBANS of '77 and onward......it made them much less like homely spinsters compared to Varsity and Collegiate and others. The later "MODERN" Schwinn graphics/logo decals tend to contrast and stand out more on the Suburban which is great, BUT THE DURABILITY/LONGEVITY OF THE WEATHERABILITY & WEAR +TEAR OF THE NEWER "modern" graphic-logo is much more fragile and it tends to scrape and lose parts much more easily.
There is no reason not to if you want to dress up the otherwise homely looking SUBURBAN with snazzy chrome fenders that were optional on Varsity/Continental.
You could also choose to repaint a SUBURBAN in one of the better color choices that the Collegiate/Varsity/Continental/Super Sport/Breeze/Hollywood/Sting Ray etc had during the sixties or seventies, or you could visit the spray can isle at TRACTOR SUPPLY, HOME DEPOT, LOWES, or WALMART and choose any of hundreds of colors that would make a great looking bicycle. You don't have to stay stock with the color. I have found that you can get superb paint quality from an expensive cheapo rattle can if you take your time and you spray outdoors when the weather is warm to hot and during the year when there is zero pollen and at a time when there are no insects flying to get in the paint. I tend to let the paint cure (dry) for about three weeks or so before attempting to re-assemble the bicycle, or installing new decals, or reinstalling headbadge etc.
The outdoors in the heat and sunshine during days without forecast for rain is good in my opinion.
Don't worry at all about possible sun fading of the new paint color. Those folks who restore and customize the old forties, fifties, and sixties Cruiser bicycles OFTEN USE INEXPENSIVE RATTLE CAN SPRAY PAINT. Yes, Schwinn did do several coats and then baked the enamel so their paint finish was slightly more durable than say what came on a JC Higgins from SEARS. The paint in the $4 spray paint that you find at WalMart, etc is every bit as good as the paint seen on bicycles and cars of the fifties and early sixties as far as color retention (fading). Today's $4 spray paint is probably better in resisting fading.
Yes, it will take probably several months to reach its most durable after the intitial painting, assuming the weather is not cold, longer if cold.
It is just a bicycle and you can get good results. It isn't a super-valuable or rare bicycle, so I'd say if you're patient and detail oriented, why not make it look really good in a color that you or your spouse or child really loves. It is extremely simple to disassemble everything and you can easily paint the frame, as it isn't very large and you can hang it up or prop it up and move it as necessary to reach all of it. GO SEE c.a.b.e. AS THEIR IS A THREAD OVER THERE THAT SHOWS EXAMPLES OF MANY FOLKS THAT PAINTED VALUABLE OLD CRUISERS WITH $4 SPRAY PAINT. Their work is fantastic and they share the Colors and the brands of which those particular colors came. There are two - tone and complimentary colors. Some Painted fenders with masked off painted pin stripes. Some examples include ten speeds of the electroforged and lighter lugged variety. If they didn't tell you that the paint was common rattle can stuff from Walmart/HomeDepot etc, you'd never know. It isn't exactly taking a walk on the wild side, but heck, if you like that sort of idea of painting it, then have a go at it. You can't screw it up. These bicycles unless in showroom perfect condition just do not have significant value..........NO VALUE other than as for the total minimal basic functional bicycle transportation value.........................probably is less than the total sum of two K-35 Kenda tires, tubes, rim strips purchased from the lowest cost webseller and the approximately $30 that your local bike shop would charge you to mount the tires and tubes, rim strips that you sourced from webland.

Another SCHWINN feature, the STEM SHIFTER (referred to as Twin STIK on 10 speed, single lever STIK on 5 speed models)
Perhaps METACORTEX might explain more on the subject of perhaps why SCHWINN made this change that I will mention here:
(s) 1967 - 1973 have the funky looking (s) on the shift lever
(S) 1974 - Chicago end has the cleaner looking (S)
On the 1974 5 speed SUBURBAN ONLY, the shifter was a Shimano thumb lever that was on the right side handlebar......1975 it returned to the STIK (S)

THE LATER (S) shifter is said to pull more cable and requires less throw (up + back movement)
THE 1967 -1973 earlier shifter is easily identified by the (s) that looks closer to the (s) s-shape as seen in the early kiss rockgroup logo than just a simple s-shape.......thus I refer to it as the funky looking (s) on the 1967-1973 STIK.
**************That is another distinguishing characteristic.
I have modified some late seventies and early eighties Twelve Speeds and Ten Speeds that came stock with DOWNTUBE Shifters to STEM SHIFTERS using the SCHWINN Twin STIK. I have used both the early (s) and the Late (S) . I prefer the later (S) cleaner S shape that indicates 1974 and later.
I know you guys are thinking, who does that, changes from downtube to stem, when clearly downtube on Japanese bikes of the late seventies/early eighties indicates a more serious bicycle that isn't the base model. I have done it because both I and other folks that wanted it that way, detest downtube shifters and prefer the stem location. It isn't a huge thing. A later owner can always return it to the downtube or whatever they wish to do.

Hey that is what is sometimes fun, making the bicycle the way that you would like it. It is a very low cost to make such a change. I obviously chose the Schwinn Twin Stik stem shift levers for such use because I like them better than everyone else's stem mounted levers. Yes, they weigh more and yes the levers themselves are large and are shiny plated and have that Schwinn (S) but I like them and that is what ultimately matters. Do what you like.
Don't however get carried away with trying to make any bike into something it can't easily be. It is gonna be difficult to modify a 1974 PINTO into a car that could compete successfully in the 24 Hours of Lemans......................................now against similar vehicles from a long ago era in the 24 Hours of Lemons competition, the old 1974 Pinto might do okay against Gremlins, Dusters, Novas, Ramblers, Falcons, Corvairs, Spitfires, MGB, FIAT 124, TR7. You also have to be smart and realize what outlay will be a sunk cost in your build of such bike. Don't worry that you will spend more than the bicycle is worth because you will spend more than the bicycle is worth when you spend $45 on two tires, tubes, rim strips, and grease to repack the hanger set(bottom bracket) #64 bearings. You'll have fun. That is what counts. Just Don't Go Crazy And Spend $200 re-habbing or customizing that bicycle unless you have the excess disposable income where $200 will otherwise have no impact on your weekly spending budget . It is a hobby. Have fun. Ride Them. Customize Them. IF YOU CAN AFFORD TO, You Might Want To Save One From The Landfill and Get It Rideable and Donate It to a Charitable Organization or someone who might need a reliable basic bicycle. I realize that not everybody can afford to absorb such a cost to do so, but if you can and you enjoy projects and tinkering and taking things apart, you only need the GLENNS COMPLETE BICYCLE MANUAL (found easily on ebay for about $4 free shipping) and YOUTUBE and other web/GOOGLE links.
Have fun, whatever you do. Such an ancient Schwinn is perhaps the perfect bicycle to learn and tinker with.
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Old 09-02-19, 07:29 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
People who are not serious Schwinn nutcases might not realize that the SCHWINN SUBURBAN has the Lighter Tubular Front Fork (same one as seen on the CONTINENTAL )...
That is true except for Suburbans produced during the first two weeks of April 1974. During that time Schwinn ran out of tubular forks and so they substituted forged (aka Varsity type) forks on the Suburban. They included a chrome cap and the fender struts had to be changed to those as used on a Varsity (the forged forks have no fender eyelets). Some would say these might be rare however 1974 was the end of the bike boom and Schwinns peak production year and the Suburban was one of the top selling models so there are probably thousands of them out there. You can see one here: https://thecabe.com/forum/threads/19...ssories.124272



Another SCHWINN feature, the STEM SHIFTER (referred to as Twin STIK on 10 speed, single lever STIK on 5 speed models)
Perhaps METACORTEX might explain more on the subject of perhaps why SCHWINN made this change that I will mention here:
(s) 1967 - 1973 have the funky looking (s) on the shift lever
(S) 1974 - Chicago end has the cleaner looking (S)
On the 1974 5 speed SUBURBAN ONLY, the shifter was a Shimano thumb lever that was on the right side handlebar......1975 it returned to the STIK (S)

THE LATER (S) shifter is said to pull more cable and requires less throw (up + back movement)
THE 1967 -1973 earlier shifter is easily identified by the (s) that looks closer to the (s) s-shape as seen in the early kiss rockgroup logo than just a simple s-shape.......thus I refer to it as the funky looking (s) on the 1967-1973 STIK.
**************That is another distinguishing characteristic...

Note there were actually 3 or 4 different variations on the Twin-Stik shifters, there were two types of 1st gen shifters and then a 2nd gen version that went through at least one production change. The Twin-Stik shifters were first introduced in 1967 production, I call these the 1st gen. versions and they had the small "s" paddles. During that first year Schwinn discovered shifting problems so starting with Dec. 1967 production they modified the shifter pulley design slightly to pull more cable. To identify them the modified shifters had a small circle imprint on the pulley area and were initially used only on the RH (rear shifter) side so the large inventory of original design shifters could continue to be used on the left (front) until supplies were exhausted. The use of the original (left) and modified (right) 1st gen. shifters continued at least well into 1969 from my observations, after that both were the modified design. Here is a pic of the 1st gen shifters from a 1969 Varsity showing the modified shifter on the right:



Starting with production on the first day after the annual summer shutdown in July 1973 Schwinn introduced the 2nd gen. Twin-Stik shifters, notable for pulling considerably more cable as well as having the large "S" paddle design. The 2nd gen. shifter had a minor mfg. change in mid-1976, when Schwinn began using a new broaching machine instead of hand grinding the levers to remove flash after casting.
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Old 09-07-19, 01:04 AM
  #25  
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https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-197...oAAOSw75JdGhuk

A GREEN Suburban currently on the Bay, located in Myrtle Beach that is one of the APRIL 1974 produced bicycles that Metacortex explained about that have the heavier Varsity blade fork due to a production supply shortage during April 1974. (#183937961596 on the bay)

The SCHWINN Lightweight owners booklet that is displayed there lists the date of sale as 5-22-74 and has the Schwinn dealer's ink stamp. The serial number which is recorded next to the date of sale is listed as DK505012
------remember that 2nd Letter tells you the year: K = 1974
--------1st Letter tells you the Month: D = APRIL

I do not know the seller. I am not the seller. I have not seen the bicycle. I will not be bidding. I simply am showing you another example of a PRODUCTION SHORTAGE- April 1974 made Suburban that has a Varsity front fork (with the Suburban/Conti fork decal) instead of the tubular fork that was seen on Suburban/Continental.
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