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1970s(?) Schwinn Traveler

Old 06-03-21, 02:48 PM
  #1  
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1970s(?) Schwinn Traveler

It's only in "good" condition, but dang look how original it is. Even the handlebar streamers! Worth $100?





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Old 06-03-21, 06:04 PM
  #2  
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I would think so.
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Old 06-03-21, 08:51 PM
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It looks like maybe a 1964.
It is a great looking bike with nice paint and chrome.
Heck yeah it is worth $100 if you' want a cruiser-comfort-slow rider!!
I don't think it is possible of being any newer than 1965.
Good riding, very durable, and fun for that type of riding.
It is has a "COOL FACTOR" that any inexpensive $150 - $500 new Wal-Mart/Target/local bike shop comfort cruiser just will not have!!
Yes, it will weigh more, but those extra pounds will not materially matter on the Slow Ride, Take It Easy Riding Circuit!
One note DURING The 1950's and all through the 1960's: Although those two color Messinger saddles look really neat, many people find them to be uncomfortable azz killaz.....They just do not have decent padding despite having decent springs. The solid color (black) Messinger is exactly the same in that respect.
THE black MATTRESS SADDLE with rivets on the side and an additional 9 horizontal springs under the padding (the springs resemble the springs on a Fender Stratocaster...you know the tremelo's springs)----that black MATTRESS SADDLE from the 1960's is very comfortable, BUT the other 50's & 60's era Messinger saddles that Schwinn did use are NOT comfortable, as they get even more brick hard after decades since they had little to no padding and the seat covering material becomes even more stiff and less pliable. Some people like the ancient metal tractor seat like seats that many ancient cruiser bikes of the 1950's & 1960's came with. The seat is ROCK HARD FIRM and you do have a metal pan and decent coil springs.
Try that bike with the original seat, but you may not like it. You can always buy a better more comfortable seat or just a gel or deep memory foam cover for the existing seat. My advice is you'll likely opt for a better seat. The new replacement seat likely will weigh a pound or so less than the original and possibly two or more, and be up to three times more comfortable.......worst case, a new seat will only be slightly more comfortable than those ROCK HARD two tone Messinger Schwinn seats of the 1950's and 1960's. They are just awful in comparison to the T-85 MessingerSCHWINN APROVED seat that replaced them on the 1970 Collegiates, certainly by all of the 1971 Collegiates. Yes that T-85 is black and the outer covering is a flexible rubber like vinyl material that survives well after fifty years. Now the old black Schwinn Approved MATTRESS SADDLE is comfortable too, but in my opinion that Schwinn Approved T-85 from the start of the Seventies and seen through the seventies is slightly more comfortable. Both are great. The Black Mattress saddle was original equipment on all SUBURBANS during the seventies, and some other tourist models during the sixties. Although SCHWINN did build better bicycles than their competitors, and the Schwinn features better chrome, better paint, and for the most part better everything except maybe perhaps SEATS, and on some models Pedals, during the 1950's and 1960's. (Just save that old seat two-tone sixties Schwinn seat, in a very large ziplock bag, and re-install if you want to sell the bike or want to show it at a bike show.. )

That is a great bike. Give the seller the single Benji, and add another cool bike to your riding stable. It will be a perfect bike to ride with your kids or ride with your parents or anyone else--or other group of folks that ride leisurely and slow!
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Old 06-03-21, 10:36 PM
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@Vintage Schwinn, THANKS for the great info, very much appreciated. I'll see if I can score it. I have been looking for an "art piece" bike.... maybe this will be a good candidate.
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Old 06-04-21, 02:11 AM
  #5  
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That red bike is nice looking enough that if for example you wanted to turn it into a 5 speed like the Collegiate, you could easily do that!
The 46 TEETH single front chainwheel is already there.
Just find a rear wheel from a 1970 - 1972 Collegiate 5 speed so you get the best 32---14 rear and the matching S5 wheel with the slight hump-ridge near where the spokes attach in the wheel's center. In 1973 the Collegiate came with the smooth S6(no slight ridge/hump) wheels. The wheels are otherwise exactly the came except the earlier S5 has the neat looking ridge/hump. Sometime during late '72 I think it was that the S6 replaced the S5. If you were to find a rear wheel from a 1964 thru 1969 Collegiate 5 speed, that wheel will have the 28---14 rear gearing like the Varsity/Conti/and10spSuburban
THE 32 toothed 1st Gear of the 1970 and later COLLEGIATE will provide better, more useful hill climbing ability than the 28 toothed 1st gear of '64-'69.

You would certainly be able to maximize your money by parting that bicycle out. I would hate to see that happen but you as it's owner do deserve to know that and to have that option to decide for yourself.
I don't think at this point in time that a customized "traveler" would be worth any less than such a very nice condition Traveler would bring. Many folks just don't respect the utility of women's frames. Sure, they (women's frames) can be more difficult to mount on the typical car/suv bicycle carry racks. The women's frames (step-through) are very good choices for mature men and even some as young as 30 because it is easier for the average middle aged or older male to mount a step through bicycle than a diamond frame. Since the nature of those heavy old Schwinns is cruising in the 9 to 15 mph speed range, they are fine at even well into speeds that are simply not possible unless Superman were pedalling or going down a long hill.

You could turn that into a 5 speed , or a 7 speed (obviously you'd have to slightly spead the frame for the wider rear axle of a 7 speed....but easily done with such a steel Electroforged Schwinn frame) Certainly, your options are not limited to that.............you could install a double up front like for example the 52/39 from a late sixties through the seventies Varsity/Sub10speed/Conti but that would require that you install a front derailleur and that might be more work than you'd want to do because if you have never done it before, or never completely dissassembled a frame and then reassembled it,......but if you've done that before and replaced cables, derailleurs etc, it will be a simple proceedure......if not, you'll figure it out over the course of a long weekend but you'll probably be cussing for a few hours until you get it right.
Heck you might be able to stick a tripple up front, pirated from some old mountain bike.........
I would keep the simplicity of the SINGLE up front and just go with 5, but you could go with 7 or six if you widen the rear to accept a wider rear axle.
The 46 TEETH front Chainwheel is typically a great choice.
Be aware that you can easily change that DOWNWARD(to something less than 46, like 44, or 42, or 40 or below...)..............-OR- upward to 48, 50 or 52.
Generally you'd want to do the math and compute the GEAR range that you'd potentially get because it may be Stupid to make a change if you lose any needed hill climbing ability...................THIS IS WHY THAT YOU WOULD LIKELY NOT WISH TO GO NUMERICALLY HIGHER THAN 46 UP FRONT unless your area is as flat as a billiard table with no hills at all.

Because that Schwinn is pre-1966, it has the 22.2 stem diameter which is common to most all ancient American makers' bikes. IN 1966, SCHWINN WENT TO A curved bar Step through. ALL 1966 and later through the Chicago end have a thicker-stronger headtube which requires a narrower 21.1 stem diameter........ 1966 and later stem WILL NOT INTERCHANGE with 1965 earlier and vice versa..............millions of both exist so the parts themselves are not an issue...

Heck, you could if you wanted to install a modern 3 piece lightweight crank and lightweight chainwheel with a modern bottom bracket conversion kit but your weight savings is not gonna be really significant. Lightweight wheels instead of steel wheels would be a better weight loss strategy to pursue. The Ashtabula one piece forged steel crank is unbreakable and is super simple and never problematiic.

Lastly, if you are so tall that you find that you need a longer seat post, or a longer stem.........that is easily achieved because both are readily available at relatively low prices. The SCHWINN seat post is typically nine inches long and 13/16" diameter with a 5/8" top part where the seat clamp attaches. The old banana seat bikes (stingrays etc) typically had seat posts that were at least 14 inches long. WALD today sells about five different lengths in this 13/16" diameter seat post, with modern 7/8" seat mount top part...........WALD also makes a couple of lengths of 13/16" diam seat posts with the old fashioned 5/8" top part.
Now, should you need to install a modern seat with 7/8" seat clamp on to an old seatpost, ---you can FLIP THE POST upside down BUT REMEMBER THAT THE NARROW PORTION WILL NOT COUNT Towards THE MINIMUM Portion NECESSARY Post NEEDED TO Be Inserted Into The Seat Tube.
Flipping the post will give you 13/16" which is only 1/16 smaller than 7/8" so it won't matter as the seat clamp can more than likely tighten further down the extra 1/16th to tightly secure the seat........................you also have both ancient Schwinn seatposts in the chromed or not chromed variety........WALD makes such 13/16 diameter posts today in Chromed and not chromed, with 7/8 top or old fashioned 5/8 top, it depends on the particular Wald part number as to the overall length and what style of top , etc.. The fact that the 1965 and earlier SCHWINN bikes have the common 22.2mm stem diameter will allow you to find new aftermkt steel stems in a wide variety of overall lengths as well as the length of the "top line portion of of how the number SEVEN"-------- 7 -------- is written......the top line portion of SEVEN could be slightly longer or not, as there are so many slightly different ones made for todays' beach cruiser customizers that with 22.2 being the stem diameter size (as it is a 1965 earlier SCHWINN) , you have so many choices of both new aftermkt or ancient used from any usa maker of the past that will give you the exact placement of the bars that you might desire.

Have fun with it, make it your own and ride it.
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Old 06-04-21, 10:46 PM
  #6  
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It's awesome to have a Schwinn expert advisor on hand 🙂👍. So I sent the $100 without even seeing the bike in person and will pick it up tomorrow.

Seller says back tire is flat. Hopefully I can replace tube without messing up the tire.

I will clean it up and hopefully install as an art piece in my house. Been thinking about it for a while and seems like a good candidate.

I'm not likely to ride it.... don't wanna break anything. It would turn some heads down at the beach tho, right?

I'll report back once I have it, thanks!
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Old 06-07-21, 05:07 PM
  #7  
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So I got the bike. Good news is that it's all original. Not so good news is that it's a bit more rusted than I thought, but not terrible.

I'll look around this site and the web, but if anyone has idea abut rust removal/cleaning, esp as it relates to the Steel wheels, feel free to chime in.

The plan is to clean it up and display somewhere in my house. The back tire would need replacement for riding, but i may leave it on there for display. Does keeping original (bad) tires increase collectability, or is it ok to put on new tires?

Anyway, here are some pics.





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Old 06-07-21, 11:03 PM
  #8  
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Get a 99 cent COPPER POT SCRUBBER (the coiled thingy that is for cleaning pots)......Grocery store or Walmart on the isle with dishwashing liquid, scotch brite pads and other kitchen, cleaning items. You get two Copper Pot Scrubbers for about 99 cents at Wallyworld.
Sprinkle COMET Cleanser on a paper or plastic plate, or anything like that including a tv dinner plate or aluminum pie plate that you'd throw away or throw in the recycling bin..............dump a little pile of COMET on the plate, then lightly wet it and/or just barely wet the COPPER POT SCRUBBER with water.................USE THE COPPER POT SCRUBBER with this light "mud of COMET" and then just Scrub, Scrub, Scrub on a small portion of the wheel to begin with.........You will see amazing results on most of the wheel......you might see the entire wheel clean up perfectly....IF THE CORROSION DID NOT REMOVE ANY OF THE CHROMIUM PLATING........you certainly won't have any issues where corrosion compromises the structural integrity because it does not appear that seriously rusty. You may have small pitted areas where you have imperfections in the outer chrome layer from 57 years of time but I seriously doubt that even the worst area there has anything that even got any farther than the outer chrome layer.
IT TAKES A WHILE, BUT IT SHOULD CLEAN UP NICE.
Do it while the old tire and old tube is on the wheel......Don't install a New Tube &/or New Tire and then begin the Scrub job, because of the copper stragglers that wear away from the Scrubber thingy and that Comet will get on the tire rubber too........You also won't have to worry while getting the area near the valve stem or any copper wire splinter stragglers needling anything.

Also, before you install new Tubes and new Tires: BE CERTAIN TO LIGHTLY FEEL WITH YOUR FINGER TIP, ALL OF THE AREAS INSIDE THE WHEEL where the tube goes beneath the tire. The reason to do this is because YOU DO NOT WANT ANYTHING THAT FEELS SHARP that could cause a flat/puncture.........you could have built up crud/corrosion even about the size of three grains of sand that might feel like a razor blade............Feel lightly with your finger tip because if you have a sharp area anywhere, you don't want to slice your finger where it is like a deep paper cut or something.... Obviously if you find anything that is rough and sharp, you do want to smooth it with extremely fine sandpaper/emery clothpaper.

Your pedals will also clean up (the corrosion on the center span of the pedal will clean up).
The chrome on the stem, and the one piece Ashtabula forged steel chrome plated pedal arms will clean up too........
Kickstand, fender braces, the spokes, and the wheel hub centers that you see within-between the spokes will clean up.
COPPER POT SCRUBBER cleaning........you can possibly get by with a Scotch Brite sponge thingy on areas that are already near perfect.

There are plenty of examples of folks cleaning up really rough looking old Schwinns to look really good over on c.a.b.e. forums and in old threads here on bike forums.
There are also hundreds of great clean-ups and restorations on YOUTUBE and elsewhere on the web. Basically, every 1940's, 1950's, 1960's and 1970's Schwinn will be about the same as far as cleaning wheels, and chrome etc. Before the the late fifties or beginning of the sixties, the factory paint wasn't nearly as good or durable, so your '64 has better factory paint than anything from 1937 to maybe 1957. That is about the only difference in trying to clean up an ancient Schwinn.

Hey, there certainly may be faster and better ways to clean up the wheels, etc than doing it by hand with a copper pot scrubber and Comet cleanser. I have not gone much beyond this simple cave-man approach. Undoubtedly, you will find others that are smarter and have perhaps a better approach that does it faster with at least the same if not better results. I can't figure out how to, for example , how to proceed in soaking the items to de-rust & clean without essentially disassembling everything which with respect to the wheels, which causes serious problems for anyone that is not super experienced in lacing spoked wheels, etc. I certainly don't recommend that. It would be as silly as totally disassembling your car bolt by bolt, suspension, sheet metal, engine, interior, everything etc. just to immaculately detail everything....


The 'waterford' site hosts the old Schwinn catalogs on the web. Google: Schwinn catalogs , or GOOGLE:1964 Schwinn catalog or Google:1961 - 1970 Schwinn catalogs........... most anything will bring up the 'waterford' site links that you can scroll through the various years.
My guess is that your TRAVELER is likely a 1964 , although it could also possibly be perhaps a 1963, less likely it perhaps could be as late as 1965.
Look at the year catalogs and see the differences as I am not an expert but I think that before '63 that frame decals were different on the seat tube, but again I don't really know. You can also GOOGLE: Schwinn serial numbers and determing the year of the Schwinn bicycle.

Have fun with it. Perhaps the best way to show it off is to ride it in a "slow-ride" cruiser type rider ride gathering, and if you don't have something like that locally, you can put out the word among your other local cyclist friends who might want to do a group "slow-ride" every other month or once a month where they can ride some of their other bicycles and have a ball doing it, and then have a cookout, bbq, picnic, party at someone's backyard or in the park, or post ride meet at pub/restaurant etc. If you have any neighbors that work in local television, or perhaps your wife plays tennis in the same tennis league as the local anchor or local meteorologist, have her mention that yall have a classic-antique-Turtle Riders slow pokes old style bike ride every two months or monthly......and invite them and anybody else......who knows you might get the tv station, sending a 22 year old greenhorn cub reporter to do a time-fill story that would air on a slow news day...........once it airs though, your classic-antique-modern slow poke- turtle riders group becomes famous locally and others join the next ride, so that you go from an average of five folks, where three were related to you, to having a group of eighteen to twenty four riders for each ride, if not more..
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Old 06-09-21, 08:13 AM
  #9  
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I just sold a men's counterpart from 1965 all shined up with two new tubes for $400 and its paint didn't come close to the paint on that one. $100 is a steal.
I've got a Men's frame 1962 in black that I've owned for 40 or so years now, it was my go to ride around town when I lived in the city for 20 years.
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Old 06-24-21, 05:23 PM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
Get a 99 cent COPPER POT SCRUBBER (the coiled thingy that is for cleaning pots)......Grocery store or Walmart on the isle with dishwashing liquid, scotch brite pads and other kitchen, cleaning items. You get two Copper Pot Scrubbers for about 99 cents at Wallyworld.
Sprinkle COMET Cleanser on a paper or plastic plate, or anything like that including a tv dinner plate or aluminum pie plate that you'd throw away or throw in the recycling bin..............dump a little pile of COMET on the plate, then lightly wet it and/or just barely wet the COPPER POT SCRUBBER with water.................USE THE COPPER POT SCRUBBER with this light "mud of COMET" and then just Scrub, Scrub, Scrub on a small portion of the wheel to begin with.........You will see amazing results on most of the wheel......you might see the entire wheel clean up perfectly....IF THE CORROSION DID NOT REMOVE ANY OF THE CHROMIUM PLATING........you certainly won't have any issues where corrosion compromises the structural integrity because it does not appear that seriously rusty. You may have small pitted areas where you have imperfections in the outer chrome layer from 57 years of time but I seriously doubt that even the worst area there has anything that even got any farther than the outer chrome layer.
IT TAKES A WHILE, BUT IT SHOULD CLEAN UP NICE.
Do it while the old tire and old tube is on the wheel......Don't install a New Tube &/or New Tire and then begin the Scrub job, because of the copper stragglers that wear away from the Scrubber thingy and that Comet will get on the tire rubber too........You also won't have to worry while getting the area near the valve stem or any copper wire splinter stragglers needling anything.

Also, before you install new Tubes and new Tires: BE CERTAIN TO LIGHTLY FEEL WITH YOUR FINGER TIP, ALL OF THE AREAS INSIDE THE WHEEL where the tube goes beneath the tire. The reason to do this is because YOU DO NOT WANT ANYTHING THAT FEELS SHARP that could cause a flat/puncture.........you could have built up crud/corrosion even about the size of three grains of sand that might feel like a razor blade............Feel lightly with your finger tip because if you have a sharp area anywhere, you don't want to slice your finger where it is like a deep paper cut or something.... Obviously if you find anything that is rough and sharp, you do want to smooth it with extremely fine sandpaper/emery clothpaper.

Your pedals will also clean up (the corrosion on the center span of the pedal will clean up).
The chrome on the stem, and the one piece Ashtabula forged steel chrome plated pedal arms will clean up too........
Kickstand, fender braces, the spokes, and the wheel hub centers that you see within-between the spokes will clean up.
COPPER POT SCRUBBER cleaning........you can possibly get by with a Scotch Brite sponge thingy on areas that are already near perfect.
.
Sorry for the delay, but THANKS AGAIN for your thoughtful and detailed reply!!! If you're ever in San Diego I owe you a beer .

I haven't started cleaning it yet, but hope to soon. I will post an update when I do.

Cheers!
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Old 06-24-21, 07:44 PM
  #11  
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I use 0000 steel wool.

Schwinn chrome cleans up VERY nicely.

A little elbow grease and some patience goes a long way.

Congrats on a GREAT find !!!!
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Old 06-24-21, 10:16 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by SDHawk View Post
So I got the bike. Good news is that it's all original. Not so good news is that it's a bit more rusted than I thought, but not terrible.

I'll look around this site and the web, but if anyone has idea abut rust removal/cleaning, esp as it relates to the Steel wheels, feel free to chime in.

The plan is to clean it up and display somewhere in my house. The back tire would need replacement for riding, but i may leave it on there for display. Does keeping original (bad) tires increase collectability, or is it ok to put on new tires?
That bike is a beauty. It's worth cleaning and preserving.

I've never tried Vintage Schwinn's method for cleaning chrome but it sounds workable. The chrome plating on Schwinn parts is high quality and quite thick- I've seen parts with far more rust shine like new after a good cleaning.

Back when I worked in a Schwinn shop (40 years ago now) we sold a product called Quick-Glo. A little of that on a shop rag removed rust and polished chrome with minimum effort. You don't want to use that rag for anything else afterwards- Quick-Glo is somewhat abrasive. It's still available: https://quick-glo.com/

It's not as effective on the non-chrome -plated parts like the fender stays and spokes. Vintage Schwinn's method may be best there, but the 60-year-old cadmium-plated spokes may be too crusty.

The tires are the now-rare Schwinn 26 x 1 3/8" (S-6) size. This is a different size tire from the much more common 26 x 1 3/8" (EA-3) size and not interchangeable! Virtually the only replacement for the Schwinn tire is made by Kenda. They're out there, but it can take some searching to find them:
Kenda K23 S-6 Schwinn 26" Tire 26x1 3/8x1 1/4(37-597) [04270005] at BikeTiresDirect
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Old 06-25-21, 01:39 PM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
That bike is a beauty. It's worth cleaning and preserving.

I've never tried Vintage Schwinn's method for cleaning chrome but it sounds workable. The chrome plating on Schwinn parts is high quality and quite thick- I've seen parts with far more rust shine like new after a good cleaning.

Back when I worked in a Schwinn shop (40 years ago now) we sold a product called Quick-Glo. A little of that on a shop rag removed rust and polished chrome with minimum effort. You don't want to use that rag for anything else afterwards- Quick-Glo is somewhat abrasive. It's still available: https://quick-glo.com/

It's not as effective on the non-chrome -plated parts like the fender stays and spokes. Vintage Schwinn's method may be best there, but the 60-year-old cadmium-plated spokes may be too crusty.

The tires are the now-rare Schwinn 26 x 1 3/8" (S-6) size. This is a different size tire from the much more common 26 x 1 3/8" (EA-3) size and not interchangeable! Virtually the only replacement for the Schwinn tire is made by Kenda. They're out there, but it can take some searching to find them:
Kenda K23 S-6 Schwinn 26" Tire 26x1 3/8x1 1/4(37-597) [04270005] at BikeTiresDirect
Hey, thanks so much for the info. I would NOT have known that about the tire sizing, you saved me a lot of aggravation!
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Old 06-25-21, 08:04 PM
  #14  
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Ok, to hijack my own thread, I see this Phillips bike listed. I think it might be a great companion art piece for the Schwinn.

It's not a steal (he's asking $165), but he's done all the work which is fine with me. I think they'd look good together up on the big wall, agree? Any opinions are welcome.

His description:
Mid 60's English 3 speed. Fully rebuilt. New bearings throughout. New tubes and tires. All original except for the Lyotard pedals from France. That is a faux pas on an English bike but they are great pedals. Note bolt on kickstand. Kickstand is too short but original to bike so wanted to keep it. Shifting works but mind is not modern shifting so is a bit quirky. Great bike for cruising boardwalk. 49 cm from center of bb spindle to top of seat tube. Front caliper brake, rear coaster brake. Fully restored, original paint.






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Old 06-28-21, 05:51 AM
  #15  
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Looks like they upgraded the rims to a set of Westrick rims from a Raleigh.
Philips was the lowest brand on the ladder back then, I don't recall ever seeing one with anything but Dunlop Endrick style rims.
In the mid to late 60's Raleigh experimented with a new pedal, a flat pedal with very substandard bearings. they fell apart and were all but impossible to repair. It would be a plausible reason for it having different pedals.
I had two Philips bikes over the years, one from the mid 50's, the other from 1965. My '65 was very much like yours but with Enrick rims and a trigger shifter, with black paint.
Being the lesser model didn't mean much, they only really lacked pump pegs on the frame compared to the top of the line Raleigh models. They were functionally the same in every way.
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