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Is this Nishiki Sport 4130 Chrome-Moly Bike worth $50?

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Is this Nishiki Sport 4130 Chrome-Moly Bike worth $50?

Old 07-23-21, 12:39 AM
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Eyes Roll
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Is this Nishiki Sport 4130 Chrome-Moly Bike worth $50?

Hello Bike Experts/Brothers/Folks:

I found this bike on ebay. It is available for local pickup. The bike looks good in the pictures, but the current owner tells me that the bike is sitting in the garage and is not ridden for several years.

Nishiki Sport Bike, 10 speed | eBay

Please take a look at the above ^ ebay listing and let me know if this Nishiki Sport 4130 Chrome-Moly Bike is worth buying for $50. Please look at the chain as well. Since the bike has not been ridden for several years, do I need to take it to a bike shop for a tune-up and spend additional money ($$$), before I start using it.

Should I buy the bike or not? Should I wait for a better deal, i.e., a bike that is ready to use and not sitting in garage for several years? I would greatly appreciate any advice in this regard. Thank you in advance for your insight and advice.

P.S. I admit I am new to this forum and only made a few posts, and I am seeking your help. Nevertheless, thanks again.










Last edited by Eyes Roll; 07-23-21 at 01:29 AM. Reason: typo & addition of pictures
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Old 07-23-21, 02:31 AM
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If you're not willing to haggle, $50 is not bad. If you want to haggle, try pointing out the rust and the fact that it needs some work and you might be able to knock off a few $$$. The most important thing to consider is whether or not you fit; if it doesn't fit you, just pass along.

There will always be better deals if you are willing to wait and look, but if you are in a rush to acquire a bike, I see no reason to dismiss this. It may not be high end, but it is a perfectly useable, everyday bike.
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Old 07-23-21, 02:41 AM
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Originally Posted by philpeugeot View Post
If you're not willing to haggle, $50 is not bad. If you want to haggle, try pointing out the rust and the fact that it needs some work and you might be able to knock off a few $$$. The most important thing to consider is whether or not you fit; if it doesn't fit you, just pass along.

There will always be better deals if you are willing to wait and look, but if you are in a rush to acquire a bike, I see no reason to dismiss this. It may not be high end, but it is a perfectly useable, everyday bike.
His earlier listing ended 3 days ago and he listed it for $85; no one placed a bid. He relisted it now for $50. If this listing also expires, maybe, he will drop down the price further, or there's also a chance he will say "F^&# it," not list it again, and donate it to Goodwill for free.

Also, the bike should fit me. The current owner's wife responded to my query that her husband is a couple of inches taller than me.

And yes, I am looking for a daily commuter.

Btw, I am not really worried about spending $50. I am more concerned about how much more $$$ I have to spend to get the bike in working order as a daily commuter.

Last edited by Eyes Roll; 07-23-21 at 02:59 AM.
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Old 07-23-21, 03:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Eyes Roll View Post
…Btw, I am not really worried about spending $50. I am more concerned about how much more $$$ I have to spend to get the bike in working order as a daily commuter.
You’ll have to see it. For reference I recently rebuilt a 1985 road bike that was in good condition. I spent $190 on tires, new chain, new handlebar tape and hoods, brake cable and shift cable, bottom bracket cartridge and freewheel tool. No labor cost, and my objective was fix it good all at once. It was rideable as-found except for 35 year old tires..

For your objective “fix as you go” might work. Tires are probably single biggest material cost if the bike is functional. That looks like a mid-1970s bike and the tires could be very old.

If you aren’t going to do the work yourself the $ will be significant.

Last edited by flangehead; 07-23-21 at 04:22 AM. Reason: Clarify condition.
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Old 07-23-21, 04:08 AM
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The saddle is as low as it can go, which suggests that the bike might be at the upper limit of the acceptable size range for the current owner. (Or maybe the owner just likes a low saddle position for casual riding.)

Looks like about a 23" frame size, which would be suitable for riders between about 5' 9" and 6' in height, give or take.
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Old 07-23-21, 04:52 AM
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I think you’re fine spending $50 on this as a low end commuter. You may be able to ride as is but were it me, I’d budget for tires, chain, cables/housing, brake pads and bar tape.
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Old 07-23-21, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
The saddle is as low as it can go, which suggests that the bike might be at the upper limit of the acceptable size range for the current owner. (Or maybe the owner just likes a low saddle position for casual riding.)

Looks like about a 23" frame size, which would be suitable for riders between about 5' 9" and 6' in height, give or take.
This is correct assessment. The current owner's and my height fall within the ^^^ stated height range.

Where is the "like" button?

Originally Posted by plonz View Post
I think you’re fine spending $50 on this as a low end commuter. You may be able to ride as is but were it me, I’d budget for tires, chain, cables/housing, brake pads and bar tape.
I am new to bike riding. No, if the bike is not ridden for several years by the current owner, I will not take a chance. I will have it thoroughly checked and tuned up before I put it to active use, or else, I will be stranded on the street, if anything goes wrong with it.

I like to do my own research and engage myself in DIY projects. On the other hand, if the bike can be tuned up at a reasonable cost, I may consider taking it to a local bike shop.

Last edited by Eyes Roll; 07-23-21 at 12:33 PM.
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Old 07-23-21, 06:21 PM
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The price is about right if you don't nee to deal with shipping. As for costs to get it road worthy for daily use figure on spending $150 may seem a bit high but from experiance I can say this about what it costs parts wise to do a proper rebuild on vintage bike ites $50-75 quality new chain $20 plus new brake pads consumables extras $50 and there will always be something else for another $50 or so.

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Old 07-23-21, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by zukahn1 View Post
The price is about right if you don't nee to deal with shipping. As for costs to get it road worthy for daily use figure on spending $150 may seem a bit high but from experiance I can say this about what it costs parts wise to do a proper rebuild on vintage bike ites $50-75 quality new chain $20 plus new brake pads consumables extras $50 and there will always be something else for another $50 or so.
That's to prepare myself to spend an amount of $200 to $250 for a 1980s bike?

What brand of tires (& tubes) do you recommend, since you seem to own a Nishiki Sport from the 70s? "No flats" tires only please. I am willing to invest in the best quality tires, no matter what.
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Old 07-23-21, 06:41 PM
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That's a fair amount of rust on the chain. The bike has rust in a few other areas. When I see rust, I figure that there will likely be other issues with the bike as well. Still $50 isn't bad if the wheels are in good shape.

You're commuting, right? You got to figure new decent quality tires with any used bike you buy. Budget at least $50 for the tires and more like $60-$80 for quality tires like these schwalbe marathon greenguard tires

https://www.amazon.com/Schwalbe-Mara...447&th=1&psc=1
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Old 07-23-21, 07:05 PM
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For tires with these type rims you want to get nicer medium weight tires with a wire bead.
https://www.walmart.com/ip/SUNLITE-T...lk-Rd/32315328
https://www.amazon.com/panaracer-Pas...24&sr=8-8&th=1
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Old 07-23-21, 07:41 PM
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As far as I'm concerned that looks like a really nice bike for $50. Good luck finding something nicer at that price point. Realize of course that it's going to need another $50 to get on the road reliably, assuming you can do the wrenching work yourself. Tires, tubes, chain, and a full maintenance once over are mandatory. If you don't know how to wrench now is the time to learn. It's pretty easy really as long as you are willing to learn.

Good luck
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Old 07-23-21, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by plonz View Post
I think you’re fine spending $50 on this as a low end commuter. You may be able to ride as is but were it me, I’d budget for tires, chain, cables/housing, brake pads and bar tape.
This is basically what I was thinking; any bike that you can get for $50 and give you rides for awhile is worth it. You will be spending more on maintenance as pointed out above. I would spend more on a nice commuter.
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Old 07-23-21, 10:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Eyes Roll View Post
That's to prepare myself to spend an amount of $200 to $250 for a 1980s bike?
...what does the era of construction have to do with it ? Maybe you would be happier with a new bike.

Originally Posted by Eyes Roll View Post
What brand of tires (& tubes) do you recommend, since you seem to own a Nishiki Sport from the 70s? "No flats" tires only please. I am willing to invest in the best quality tires, no matter what.
...many people with a wide range of mechanical skills, and life experiences, start threads here for advice. My reaction at this point to your questions is that maybe you would be happier with a new bike, or maybe taking the bus. While there are some tyres /tubes that are guaranteed not to flat, they slow you down considerably. Most people settle for a compromise of some flat protection in a commuter tyre, maybe even use some sort of internal sealant that will work to seal small punctures. But no flats is kind of a marketing myth.

When you start a thread asking if 50 bucks is a good price for a decent bike, then segue to a willingness to spend whatever it takes to get the best tyres that will never go flat, it indicates that maybe you won't be happy as a bike commuter. I would say you have some unrealistic expectations as a starting point, which is a recipe for disappointment. Bicycles are a marvelous means of transportation, but they are not without mechanical problems that arise as a mater of course. You can either learn to deal with them yourself, which is usually the cheapest solution.

Or you can pay someone at a shop. But those guys are not working for five bucks an hour any more. So, as already stated, 50 bucks is small change in terms of your startup cost investment.
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Old 07-24-21, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
That's a fair amount of rust on the chain. The bike has rust in a few other areas. When I see rust, I figure that there will likely be other issues with the bike as well. Still $50 isn't bad if the wheels are in good shape.

You're commuting, right? You got to figure new decent quality tires with any used bike you buy. Budget at least $50 for the tires and more like $60-$80 for quality tires like these schwalbe marathon greenguard tires

https://www.amazon.com/Schwalbe-Mara...447&th=1&psc=1

Originally Posted by zukahn1 View Post
For tires with these type rims you want to get nicer medium weight tires with a wire bead.
https://www.walmart.com/ip/SUNLITE-T...lk-Rd/32315328
https://www.amazon.com/panaracer-Pas...24&sr=8-8&th=1
Thanks for the tire suggestions. I am also thinking about "Continental Gatorskin" tires. I've heard people saying really good things about them.

Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...what does the era of construction have to do with it ? Maybe you would be happier with a new bike.



...many people with a wide range of mechanical skills, and life experiences, start threads here for advice. My reaction at this point to your questions is that maybe you would be happier with a new bike, or maybe taking the bus. While there are some tyres /tubes that are guaranteed not to flat, they slow you down considerably. Most people settle for a compromise of some flat protection in a commuter tyre, maybe even use some sort of internal sealant that will work to seal small punctures. But no flats is kind of a marketing myth.

When you start a thread asking if 50 bucks is a good price for a decent bike, then segue to a willingness to spend whatever it takes to get the best tyres that will never go flat, it indicates that maybe you won't be happy as a bike commuter. I would say you have some unrealistic expectations as a starting point, which is a recipe for disappointment. Bicycles are a marvelous means of transportation, but they are not without mechanical problems that arise as a mater of course. You can either learn to deal with them yourself, which is usually the cheapest solution.

Or you can pay someone at a shop. But those guys are not working for five bucks an hour any more. So, as already stated, 50 bucks is small change in terms of your startup cost investment.
I think I can deal with 1 flat per year, if I am using a bike on a daily basis. A couple of days ago, I have had someone who rides bike to work daily telling me that he did not have a flat tire in 4 years, and he uses "Continental Contact" tires.

I am not ruling out the option of me spending $350 to $400 and getting a new bike altogether. Thanks for your comment.
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Old 07-24-21, 08:57 AM
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1 flat per year would be wonderful, but you have to be prepared to flat on every ride and carry the appropriate equipment to deal with it. I carry two tubes and a patch kit just in case. And yes, i've flatted twice on the same ride before.

Since you mention a budget up to $400, I'd target a nicer bike than the Nishiki referenced in the first post; indexed shifting, and of course, a frame that fits you nicely.

Something like a Diamondback Centurion TIG road bike would be a great target. These bikes had 7 or 8 speed indexed shifting and a nice sturdy frame. A friend loaned me his while I was on vacation and I came to really appreciate that bike. It was sturdy and handled well. Honestly, all the bike most people (roadies) would need. The rest is the responsibility of the riders legs!
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Old 07-24-21, 09:09 AM
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[QUOTE=Eyes Roll;22154040]Hello Bike Experts/Brothers/Folks:

I found this bike on ebay. It is available for local pickup. The bike looks good in the pictures, but the current owner tells me that the bike is sitting in the garage and is not ridden for several years.

snip



/QUOTE]

Why don't you put up a thread in the C&V valuation forum saying that you are looking for an inexpensive bike to commute on. If you provide a rough location and the size you need, the posters here will search for you and give you an idea of what is out there that is good. The folks here love shopping for other people so you will get a fair number of responses.

Also insofar as tires for commuting are concerned (and to address a question you asked earlier), the continental gatorskin have good protection against flats but a thicker tire like the schwalbe marathon greenguard should be better (and heavier). Alternatively run any tire you like and just get a tire liner.
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Old 07-25-21, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Nessism View Post
1 flat per year would be wonderful, but you have to be prepared to flat on every ride and carry the appropriate equipment to deal with it. I carry two tubes and a patch kit just in case. And yes, i've flatted twice on the same ride before.
...there was a period of about a year or 18 months here, when one city recycling pickup truck was running around the various neighborhoods, dropping little piles of small glass shards, right in the bike lane. It took me about three weeks to figure out what was going on, and another year and a half to convince the city to fix it. In that episode, I flatted twice just getting out of my neighborhood, on one occasion, riding over to the bike trail. I got a little discouraged, and came home to swap out bikes for something with a heavier tyre.

My city, unlike a lot of others, has never adopted a parking system that allows the sweepers to get the street section closest to the curb.

I think maybe I am still a little bitter, but it did give me some good experience at selecting puncture resistant tyres.
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Old 07-26-21, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by plonz View Post
I think you’re fine spending $50 on this as a low end commuter. You may be able to ride as is but were it me, I’d budget for tires, chain, cables/housing, brake pads and bar tape.
I totally agree with this work needed assessment. Also...

The seat post might be stuck and that can be a real pain in the, well you know. And, for sure, the bottom bracket, head set and wheel hubs will need fresh grease. If you can do that work yourself, the cost will be minimal. But if you have to hire a bike shop to do the work, you might be looking at a bill of between $100 and $200 dollars. Don't take the new grease thing lightly. I have seen nothing but rust dust in grease cavities and, the most bottom bracket housing that caused both my eyebrows to go up. There was no grease left in this bottom bracket. and the same went for the head set and wheel hubs.
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Old 07-26-21, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...My city, unlike a lot of others, has never adopted a parking system that allows the sweepers to get the street section closest to the curb…..
What is street sweeping?
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Old 07-27-21, 09:08 AM
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Bottom end bike in neglected, needs love condition. Do you have the time/tools/aptitude/pile of consumables to refurbish it? If not, PASS. Myself, I would pass as it would take me about 4 to 5 hours time, plus $50 in consumables, and I would end up with a $75 bike. When I find bikes like this one at garage sales, I'll buy for $10 and donate to the co-op.

Stem shifters + nutted axles + steel seat post + steel chain rings + probably steel handlebars = no thanks.

In seeking out a commuter, myself on a budget I'm getting a nice, rigid frame MTB.
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