Notices
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals. Use this subforum for all requests as to "How much is this vintage bike worth?"Do NOT try to sell it in here, use the Marketplaces.

velosports appalache

Old 06-02-22, 12:11 PM
  #1  
Frenzen
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Posts: 154
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
velosports appalache

person is asking $140








the pictures are terrible and owner is claiming that its a 53 cm bike. I might be wrong but it looks bigger or the person might have mismeasured? Looks like a decent touring bike
Frenzen is offline  
Old 06-02-22, 02:13 PM
  #2  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 23,371

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 90 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1173 Post(s)
Liked 792 Times in 537 Posts
Steel bars and seat post are odd choices on an otherwise decent bike. I'd head to a co-op for replacements.

As a flip? Not here.

In the flip arena, you really know your costs and potential market pricing. Generally, on flip bikes you have to buy them really cheap, shockingly cheap. Or you buy top of the line stuff, pay way under market, but the bikes themselves won't be cheap. Some of my very BEST flips cost between $500 and $750. At these higher prices, you really need to know values. I paid $800 for two bikes at a garage sale. Who pays $800 at a garage sale? I more than doubled my money on those two. Another typical advantage of the higher priced stuff is it will need very little work. Much more likely the bike will have good tires, cables, chain, etc.

I would never pay $140 for a bike to flip for $250. First, you have no margin for surprises. BB failed? Worn out wheel hub cones? Chain? Worn freewheel or chain rings? And what if it doesn't sell for what you are thinking? And what about a budget for consumables? Bar tape, tires, cables, housings? List goes on and on.

If I am buying a neglected bike that I want to refresh and flip, I'd spend about $50 max acquiring a bike for the $250 market. That leaves money for surprises, consumables, and something for my time. The bike you have pictured above is definitely neglected!

I would not call $140 for a possible $250 flip to be a decent flip, far from it.

To save money on consumables, you have to buy in bulk. No buying a couple of tires at a local shop, or cables, chain, or bar tape. Pay shop prices for consumables and your profit evaporates. I am not faulting local bike shops. Its a tough business to be successful. They really have no choice but to mark up consumables like cables, tires, tubes, chains, etc. It's how they keep the lights on. On the other hand, if you are going to repair bikes to flip, the margins are thin. There is no room to pay retail for anything. Bike tools aren't cheap either and you will need quite a few of them. Do 10 to 20 flips, and you will be able to afford some nice tools.

Last edited by wrk101; 06-03-22 at 06:46 AM.
wrk101 is offline  
Likes For wrk101:
Old 06-02-22, 02:39 PM
  #3  
ClydeClydeson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,481
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
Liked 793 Times in 458 Posts
I would have guessed 54cm solely based on the pictures.

If it fits you, and it's in decent shape (wheels pretty straight, not too many rattles or clunks if you pick it up and drop it on the ground) you should buy it.
ClydeClydeson is offline  
Old 06-02-22, 03:57 PM
  #4  
Frenzen
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Posts: 154
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Yeah the bike itself could be a decent flip maybe $200-250 in Montreal but 53 cm is too small for me which is a bummer since its a nice bike!
Frenzen is offline  
Old 06-02-22, 05:14 PM
  #5  
SoccerBallXan
Full Member
 
SoccerBallXan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Arizona
Posts: 418

Bikes: Many!

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 183 Times in 110 Posts
I would NOT be purchasing this bike to flip, and I feel that what it's currently offered at is the max it'll sell for. In general I would NOT be purchasing this bike, as it's nothing special and has clearly been treated as such. Unless you're already a bike mechanic, then undertaking a bike like this can be far more of a headache than its worth.

I understand that you're in Canada and that VeloSport is a more common name, but in your price range, I would be searching for larger, more reputable bike brands. You're bound to find a steel tourer from Schwinn, Raleigh, Peugeot, Centurion, or any other company that's been around the block a bit longer.
SoccerBallXan is offline  
Old 06-02-22, 05:47 PM
  #6  
prairiepedaler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Winnipeg - traffic ticket central
Posts: 1,487

Bikes: Looking for "the One"

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 237 Times in 159 Posts
Velosport where you are is kind of like Sekine was here at one time. I've seen several Velosports show up locally from time to time in varying degrees of quality but hadn't seen an Appalache like the one you have shown. Too bad the photos are so terrible - it's almost like you need those green & red 3d glasses to bring it all together into focus.
prairiepedaler is offline  
Old 06-02-22, 09:29 PM
  #7  
Frenzen
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Posts: 154
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by prairiepedaler View Post
Velosport where you are is kind of like Sekine was here at one time. I've seen several Velosports show up locally from time to time in varying degrees of quality but hadn't seen an Appalache like the one you have shown. Too bad the photos are so terrible - it's almost like you need those green & red 3d glasses to bring it all together into focus.
I had a person almost sell me her appalache frame exactly same color few days ago but it was 56 or 58cm for $50 but at the end person changed her mind and kept it.
Frenzen is offline  
Old 06-03-22, 05:48 AM
  #8  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 23,230
Mentioned: 629 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4702 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2,968 Times in 1,841 Posts
The subject bicycle appears to be an Appalache from the very late 1980s to very early 1990s. Unlike the other bicycles the OP has been posting, this one is a true grand touring model with cantilever brakes, triple chainring and proper fittings for racks and fenders. It is missing some of the finer touches, like a 3rd bottle mount, bar end shift levers and fittings for a lighting system but those a cost concessions appropriate for it's entry level status. The frame is hi-tensile steel and the component level is comparable, with items like a steel handlebar and steel, tubular seat post. All this adds up to a relatively high weight for a grand touring bicycle. Conversely, it's hard to find a true grand touring bicycle at anywhere near this price, unless it has been seriously abused and neglected. IMO, it's fair pricing for the market. The seller would appear to close on the size claim.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 06-03-22, 08:41 AM
  #9  
Frenzen
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Posts: 154
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The subject bicycle appears to be an Appalache from the very late 1980s to very early 1990s. Unlike the other bicycles the OP has been posting, this one is a true grand touring model with cantilever brakes, triple chainring and proper fittings for racks and fenders. It is missing some of the finer touches, like a 3rd bottle mount, bar end shift levers and fittings for a lighting system but those a cost concessions appropriate for it's entry level status. The frame is hi-tensile steel and the component level is comparable, with items like a steel handlebar and steel, tubular seat post. All this adds up to a relatively high weight for a grand touring bicycle. Conversely, it's hard to find a true grand touring bicycle at anywhere near this price, unless it has been seriously abused and neglected. IMO, it's fair pricing for the market. The seller would appear to close on the size claim.
Yes its a bummer because I wish it was my size, and I love the paint scheme.
Frenzen is offline  
Old 06-03-22, 11:48 AM
  #10  
SoccerBallXan
Full Member
 
SoccerBallXan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Arizona
Posts: 418

Bikes: Many!

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 183 Times in 110 Posts
I believe you can do much better in that price range.

I’m not familiar with your bike market in Canada, but it couldn’t be more than +/- $100 USD for most bikes and bike brands. Here in the states, living in a larger city, just typing in “touring” into the local Craigslist (Kijiji) is showing me 3 better options (Centurion Pro Touring, Specialized Expedition, Nishiki International) for $20-50 more USD.

I say hold out and search diligently if you’re looking for a sturdy touring bike.
SoccerBallXan is offline  
Old 06-03-22, 11:58 AM
  #11  
ClydeClydeson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,481
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
Liked 793 Times in 458 Posts
Originally Posted by SoccerBallXan View Post
but in your price range, I would be searching for larger, more reputable bike brands. You're bound to find a steel tourer from Schwinn, Raleigh, Peugeot, Centurion, or any other company that's been around the block a bit longer.
Velo Sport was one of the largest and most reputable Canadian brands. This one is Hi-ten steel, but otherwise this is far better quality than any CDN made Raleigh or USA made Schwinn, IMO. Funny you mentioned Peugeot because most (all?) Peugeots of this era you see in North America were made in the same Quebec facility as Velo Sports.
ClydeClydeson is offline  
Old 06-03-22, 12:27 PM
  #12  
SoccerBallXan
Full Member
 
SoccerBallXan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Arizona
Posts: 418

Bikes: Many!

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 183 Times in 110 Posts
Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
Velo Sport was one of the largest and most reputable Canadian brands. This one is Hi-ten steel, but otherwise this is far better quality than any CDN made Raleigh or USA made Schwinn, IMO. Funny you mentioned Peugeot because most (all?) Peugeots of this era you see in North America were made in the same Quebec facility as Velo Sports.

I understand Velo Sport is a familiar Canadian brand and they've been circulated across Canada ala Schwinn style since the 1970s (In fact, this is a note I have saved from T-Mar in my "Manufacturer History" notepad). And you're right, searching for a Peugeot might be pointless as they're essentially the same brand with potentially less Canadian circulation. I'm sure there's Velo Sports that put Schwinns to shame and vice versa.


However, again, I would NOT be suggesting my beginner bike friend pick up this bike for $140 USD* (Edited from CAD). Between the half beaten bike and half beaten photographs, I would suggest waiting as the market tends to bring something better with time. If this bike fit OP and if they really wanted it, I would suggest picking up the bike in-person with $100 CAD in hand (the additional $40 CAD in the back pocket for when bargaining goes south).

Last edited by SoccerBallXan; 06-03-22 at 12:33 PM.
SoccerBallXan is offline  
Old 06-03-22, 01:06 PM
  #13  
ClydeClydeson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,481
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 516 Post(s)
Liked 793 Times in 458 Posts
Originally Posted by SoccerBallXan View Post
I understand Velo Sport is a familiar Canadian brand and they've been circulated across Canada ala Schwinn style since the 1970s (In fact, this is a note I have saved from T-Mar in my "Manufacturer History" notepad). And you're right, searching for a Peugeot might be pointless as they're essentially the same brand with potentially less Canadian circulation. I'm sure there's Velo Sports that put Schwinns to shame and vice versa.


However, again, I would NOT be suggesting my beginner bike friend pick up this bike for $140 USD* (Edited from CAD). Between the half beaten bike and half beaten photographs, I would suggest waiting as the market tends to bring something better with time. If this bike fit OP and if they really wanted it, I would suggest picking up the bike in-person with $100 CAD in hand (the additional $40 CAD in the back pocket for when bargaining goes south).
I have seen very few Schwinns that would compete with the quality of most Velo Sports - very few Schwinns have built in bosses for shifters and derailleurs as this one does, and most were with 'claw' rear derailleur mounting, seamed tubes, their hideous 'electro forged' joints, and Ashtabula BBs. There are a few I have seen that were higher end models, but very few. After they started getting their bikes made in Taiwan the quality went up significantly, which is why I specifically said 'USA made Schwinns' in comparison to Velo Sports.

Furthermore, most of the parts on this VS look to be decent quality - aluminum triple crank with integrated spider and removable chainrings, aluminium rims (can't tell if the hubs are aluminium or steel), cantilever brakes, Shimano Indexed downtube shifters - IMO an excellent choice for a refurb project. Unless I am missing something - you referred to the bike as 'half beaten' - but I think it looks pretty good for a 35 year old bike.

I think OP said the bike is the wrong size, which is generally a complete deal breaker, but it's a better bike than I think you are giving it credit for.
ClydeClydeson is offline  
Old 06-03-22, 01:25 PM
  #14  
SoccerBallXan
Full Member
 
SoccerBallXan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Arizona
Posts: 418

Bikes: Many!

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 183 Times in 110 Posts
Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
I have seen very few Schwinns that would compete with the quality of most Velo Sports - very few Schwinns have built in bosses for shifters and derailleurs as this one does, and most were with 'claw' rear derailleur mounting, seamed tubes, their hideous 'electro forged' joints, and Ashtabula BBs. There are a few I have seen that were higher end models, but very few. After they started getting their bikes made in Taiwan the quality went up significantly, which is why I specifically said 'USA made Schwinns' in comparison to Velo Sports.

Furthermore, most of the parts on this VS look to be decent quality - aluminum triple crank with integrated spider and removable chainrings, aluminium rims (can't tell if the hubs are aluminium or steel), cantilever brakes, Shimano Indexed downtube shifters - IMO an excellent choice for a refurb project. Unless I am missing something - you referred to the bike as 'half beaten' - but I think it looks pretty good for a 35 year old bike.

I think OP said the bike is the wrong size, which is generally a complete deal breaker, but it's a better bike than I think you are giving it credit for.
I do not think this is a bad bike, nor did I ever discredit the bike. I did say it's nothing special, which lets be real, is the complete truth. If in your honest opinion it's excellent for a refurb project, then it's a half beat bike... I do not think Velo Sports are bad bikes. I do not think USA made Schwinns are bad bikes. In fact, I hardly think that any bike which didn't come from Walmart is a bad bike.

Again, I would not recommend this bike to any beginner bike friend of mine. If you have the tools and consumables to get this bike on the road (and if it fits), then it's a fine deal.
SoccerBallXan is offline  
Likes For SoccerBallXan:
Old 06-03-22, 02:01 PM
  #15  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 23,371

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 90 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1173 Post(s)
Liked 792 Times in 537 Posts
Originally Posted by ClydeClydeson View Post
I have seen very few Schwinns that would compete with the quality of most Velo Sports - very few Schwinns have built in bosses for shifters and derailleurs as this one does, and most were with 'claw' rear derailleur mounting, seamed tubes, their hideous 'electro forged' joints, and Ashtabula BBs. There are a few I have seen that were higher end models, but very few. After they started getting their bikes made in Taiwan the quality went up significantly, which is why I specifically said 'USA made Schwinns' in comparison to Velo Sports.

Furthermore, most of the parts on this VS look to be decent quality - aluminum triple crank with integrated spider and removable chainrings, aluminium rims (can't tell if the hubs are aluminium or steel), cantilever brakes, Shimano Indexed downtube shifters - IMO an excellent choice for a refurb project. Unless I am missing something - you referred to the bike as 'half beaten' - but I think it looks pretty good for a 35 year old bike.

I think OP said the bike is the wrong size, which is generally a complete deal breaker, but it's a better bike than I think you are giving it credit for.
I would not call this bike half a beater. I would not call it high end either. High ten steel frame, steel seat post and handlebar, Those are features of lower end bikes. I've owned dozens of USA made Schwinns that were much better. By the late 1980s (when this Velosport was made), Schwinn was making several decent bikes. Now in the 1970s, not so much.

The Schwinn Voyageur touring bikes from the 1980s were quite a bit nicer. Then you have the Cimarron, made in USA, I've owned several and one is my main ride. I love the lugged steel mixed with filet brazed frame on the Cimarron. The entire Columbus Tenax product line by Schwinn was pretty good.

Schwinn's mistake IMHO was made in the 1970s. They knew how to make better bikes (witness the Paramount and Superior), but they refused to upgrade the lower end of their product line, which was the vast majority of their sales. They left the door open for the Japanese and later for Trek to come in. Who knows what Schwinn would look like today had they upgraded their bikes, adopted fine (and low cost) Japanese made parts like Motobecane did. I remember being blown away by the quality/performance of the Nishiki International in 1973. Cromoly double butted frame, three piece alloy crankset, Suntour derailleurs, etc. Its really what the Schwinn Continental or the Super Sport should have been. Why Schwinn didn't see what an average 16 year old customer could see is baffling to me. If anything, they should have been watching their competition very closely and responding quickly to the threat.

Last edited by wrk101; 06-03-22 at 02:30 PM.
wrk101 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.