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Atala Competizione components and value?

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Atala Competizione components and value?

Old 06-19-22, 10:54 AM
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Atala Competizione components and value?

Hello,

I want to ask about the value and the original paint and components of the bike in the pictures. It doesn't actually say Competizione anywhere, and even though both rims are Rigida, the back rim has groovings on the side, unlike the front. The ad mentions d'alessandro tires but I don't have those. The specs are as follows:

Double butted chromo frame(?)
Stronglight crank
Complete Campagnolo gran turismo shifters front and rear derailieur
Campagnolo seat post
Campagnolo hubs
Rigida chromolux rims made in France (mismatched?)
Weinman breaks
Atom pedals
TTT stem made in Italy
Avocet touring 1 saddle made in Italy


P.s. I tried to upload 19 images, site told me I can upload only 10, reduced to 10, site told me I can only post images after I made 10 posts! Most likely I can't post url's either!
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Old 06-19-22, 11:30 AM
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Replacing tubular rims and tyres with wired-on versions was common during the early 1970s bicycle boom. Consumers would buy a high end bicycle with a tubular wheelset only to becoming frustrated with the relatively high fragility, repair difficulty and high cost of the tyres. Outside of the rims and tyres, the components appear to be OEM.

Too many photos for an assist. Link to OP's album: https://www.bikeforums.net/g/user/554907
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Old 06-19-22, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Replacing tubular rims and tyres with wired-on versions was common during the early 1970s bicycle boom. Consumers would buy a high end bicycle with a tubular wheelset only to becoming frustrated with the relatively high fragility, repair difficulty and high cost of the tyres. Outside of the rims and tyres, the components appear to be OEM.

Too many photos for an assist. Link to OP's album
Thanks a lot, yes you can see pictures in the link you provided. So are you saying the mismatched rigida rims are not originals? By having two different contact surfaces between the break pads and the rims, I assumed they did that intentionally to ensure a stoppage at all weather conditions, but maybe not! Tbh, I'm not sure what "tubular tires" are, care to elaborate? Lastly, do you think this bike is worth fixing and keeping?!
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Old 06-19-22, 11:52 AM
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.
...a moderator will probably moe this over into its proper place in the C+V valuations forum.
But as it sits now, it's more of interest to someone looking for a project bike, so whatever you pay for a project bike.

I wouldn't take it on as a project, but someone probably will for maybe a hundred or a hundred and fifty dollars.
The steel rims are a questionable change, and the original derailleurs are nothing to write home about, except maybe to complain.
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Old 06-19-22, 11:54 AM
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Advantages and disadvantages of tubular tires

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Old 06-19-22, 11:58 AM
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What year? Man, I loved my probably 1972 Competezione, purchased in 1979 or 1980. I knew the previous owner, and he didn't ride it much, and he kept it original. So ... mine had a label that said 'Reynolds 531 frame tubes' - manganese moly, not chrome-moly, and probably straight-gauge, not double-butted.

The Campy GT rear derailleur is just plain awful. I quickly replaced it with a Suntour. The GT front der was actually a Valentino or Valentino Extra; it was much better than the GT but still undistinguished. The hubs were Campy Gran Sport, IIRC.

In the early '70s, the Comp came with sewups. I built new wheels rather than risk riding on sewups, but I most definitely didn't use steel rims. It looks like someone just jammed in 27" wheels with steel rims, which means you pretty much can't stop in rain. You'll need new wheels - something like this at $149 plus shipping: https://www.velomine.com/index.php?m...2dtkks4nfif3h1 - but the Comp came with 121mm rear dropout spacing, so you may have to pay to get the dropouts re-spaced.

Mine had Weinmann center-pulls front and back.

IOW, the bike you've asked about looks like it was thrown together by someone with spare parts. It needs a lot of work. Even if you clean the bike up and overhaul the bearings (headset, BB), you still have to get or build new wheels, because steel wheels are pretty far over into the 'unsafe' category. Just the parts for building new wheels will probably cost more than buying them ready-made.

IDK ... $50 as a project? More if you part it out, but given how the bike looks, I wouldn't expect the parts to be in very good shape.

Last edited by philbob57; 06-19-22 at 12:09 PM.
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Old 06-19-22, 12:02 PM
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Originally Posted by UnD3R0aTh View Post
Thanks a lot, yes you can see pictures in the link you provided. So are you saying the mismatched rigida rims are not originals? By having two different contact surfaces between the break pads and the rims, I assumed they did that intentionally to ensure a stoppage at all weather conditions, but maybe not! Tbh, I'm not sure what "tubular tires" are, care to elaborate? Lastly, do you think this bike is worth fixing and keeping?!

Neither the front nor the rear rims and tyres are original. A tubular tyre, also known as sew-up or double tube, is a tyre style in which the casing is stitched closed around around the inner tube, so that the inner tube is completely encased. The tyre is then glued onto the rim. The advantages are lighter weight and better ride characteristics. The drawbacks are reduced puncture resistance, difculty to repair and higher replacement cost. I'll defer to other members on the value.
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Old 06-19-22, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by philbob57 View Post
...It looks like someone just jammed in 27" wheels with steel rims...looks like it was thrown together by someone with spare parts...
Except fof the expected consumables and rims, it looks OEM. The wheels were likely rebuilt, as those are the correct Campagnolo Tipo hubs.
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Old 06-19-22, 01:27 PM
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Since I loved my Comp, I'm sort of horrified at what someone has done to that bike, so I probably am wrong about jamming 27" wheels in there. With the right hubs, I agree that someone actually rebuilt the sewup wheels with steel rims. Why, oh why did they not use aluminum rims?

I rode my Comp with sewups for a few weeks while I saved up for rims and spokes after buying the bike. It was glorious - but rebuilding the wheels was cheaper than buying spare tires, and I thought it would be easier to learn to build wheels than to repair sewups. I never thought I'd have the dexterity necessary to repair them anyway. The bike was duller with the clinchers, but I rode with a lot less fear of a ride-ending failure. (Of course, one Sunday the chain came apart, and I didn't have my chain tool with me.)

As to the value of tubulars, the ride was absolutely exhilarating! OTOH, a former neighbor (switched to clinchers a few years ago. He had the skill to repair his tires, but he needed to use that skill after almost every ride on the roads around here.

I still think the bike shows evidence of improvisation. As I said, my bike at 2 center-pulls. This has 1 CP and 1 SP.
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Old 06-19-22, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by philbob57 View Post
What year? Man, I loved my probably 1972 Competezione, purchased in 1979 or 1980. I knew the previous owner, and he didn't ride it much, and he kept it original. So ... mine had a label that said 'Reynolds 531 frame tubes' - manganese moly, not chrome-moly, and probably straight-gauge, not double-butted.

The Campy GT rear derailleur is just plain awful. I quickly replaced it with a Suntour. The GT front der was actually a Valentino or Valentino Extra; it was much better than the GT but still undistinguished. The hubs were Campy Gran Sport, IIRC.

In the early '70s, the Comp came with sewups. I built new wheels rather than risk riding on sewups, but I most definitely didn't use steel rims. It looks like someone just jammed in 27" wheels with steel rims, which means you pretty much can't stop in rain. You'll need new wheels - something like this at $149 plus shipping: https://www.velomine.com/index.php?m...2dtkks4nfif3h1 - but the Comp came with 121mm rear dropout spacing, so you may have to pay to get the dropouts re-spaced.

Mine had Weinmann center-pulls front and back.

IOW, the bike you've asked about looks like it was thrown together by someone with spare parts. It needs a lot of work. Even if you clean the bike up and overhaul the bearings (headset, BB), you still have to get or build new wheels, because steel wheels are pretty far over into the 'unsafe' category. Just the parts for building new wheels will probably cost more than buying them ready-made.

IDK ... $50 as a project? More if you part it out, but given how the bike looks, I wouldn't expect the parts to be in very good shape.
-----

wrt dating -

the bicycle's Stronglight model 49D chainset received allen key chainwheel bolts in 1973 so do not think it could be later than 1972

the machine's Nuovo Tipo model wheel hubs will carry a date marking on their axle locknuts -



-----
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Old 06-19-22, 03:58 PM
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Is that a gearing chart on the stem?

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Old 06-19-22, 04:18 PM
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I think those wheels were maybe snagged off of an Atala Grand Prix. I have a late 60s Grand Prix and that’s how the wheels came stock. Campagnolo Tipo hubs laced to 27” Rigida steel rims.

Last edited by Pcampeau; 06-19-22 at 06:23 PM.
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Old 06-20-22, 08:38 AM
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Thread moved from C&V to this subforum where it’s more appropriate to cover the original questions on value
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Old 06-21-22, 11:44 AM
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bad news guys, I just had this bike stolen yesterday, what are the odds! :'(
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Old 06-25-22, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc View Post
Is that a gearing chart on the stem?

​​​​​​
Aaaaaaaaaand the bike's been recovered, yes I believe these are gear ratios, so what should I do with the bike then? Should I get a new aluminum 700c wheelset, would that make it worth it?!
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Old 06-25-22, 09:24 AM
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Rocovered! Cool tunes, sounds like it's ok, or not trashed.
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Old 06-25-22, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr. 66 View Post
Rocovered! Cool tunes, sounds like it's ok, or not trashed.
Some idiot tried to hide it the building's bike room where I had it leaning against the door just for 10 seconds, I suspected it's in there and surely I found it unscathed! never leave your bike out of your sight and always lock it
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Old 06-25-22, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Pcampeau View Post
I think those wheels were maybe snagged off of an Atala Grand Prix. I have a late 60s Grand Prix and that’s how the wheels came stock. Campagnolo Tipo hubs laced to 27” Rigida steel rims.
This wheel setup lesser Campy hubs with Rigada chromax rims was pretty common on 60's and early 70's French and Italian bikes. Seems about half the semi nicer stuff I have seen from the 60's had this wheel setup. The only issue is it doesn't take modern hooked higher pressure tires well.
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Old 06-25-22, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by zukahn1 View Post
This wheel setup lesser Campy hubs with Rigada chromax rims was pretty common on 60's and early 70's French and Italian bikes. Seems about half the semi nicer stuff I have seen from the 60's had this wheel setup. The only issue is it doesn't take modern hooked higher pressure tires well.
Any idea how and why the rims are mismatched with the side engravings?!
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Old 06-25-22, 03:44 PM
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Originally Posted by UnD3R0aTh View Post
Aaaaaaaaaand the bike's been recovered, yes I believe these are gear ratios, so what should I do with the bike then? Should I get a new aluminum 700c wheelset, would that make it worth it?!
...I think you might have trouble finding a new wheel set that fits the frame, and most people here would probably lace new alloy rims onto the existing hubs after cleaning and re-greasing them.
But as a performance upgrade, alloy rims and decent tires are probably the most bang for your buck. That still won't make the shifting work any better. It's hard to describe the work involved in a project like this.
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Old 06-28-22, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by philbob57 View Post
What year? Man, I loved my probably 1972 Competezione, purchased in 1979 or 1980. I knew the previous owner, and he didn't ride it much, and he kept it original. So ... mine had a label that said 'Reynolds 531 frame tubes' - manganese moly, not chrome-moly, and probably straight-gauge, not double-butted.

The Campy GT rear derailleur is just plain awful. I quickly replaced it with a Suntour. The GT front der was actually a Valentino or Valentino Extra; it was much better than the GT but still undistinguished. The hubs were Campy Gran Sport, IIRC.

In the early '70s, the Comp came with sewups. I built new wheels rather than risk riding on sewups, but I most definitely didn't use steel rims. It looks like someone just jammed in 27" wheels with steel rims, which means you pretty much can't stop in rain. You'll need new wheels - something like this at $149 plus shipping: https://www.velomine.com/index.php?m...2dtkks4nfif3h1 - but the Comp came with 121mm rear dropout spacing, so you may have to pay to get the dropouts re-spaced.

Mine had Weinmann center-pulls front and back.

IOW, the bike you've asked about looks like it was thrown together by someone with spare parts. It needs a lot of work. Even if you clean the bike up and overhaul the bearings (headset, BB), you still have to get or build new wheels, because steel wheels are pretty far over into the 'unsafe' category. Just the parts for building new wheels will probably cost more than buying them ready-made.

IDK ... $50 as a project? More if you part it out, but given how the bike looks, I wouldn't expect the parts to be in very good shape.
what brand, size and material were the original rims?! what makes the wheel unsafe in your opinion? would you recommend a certain rim to build it up on the existing hubs? what size and material? thx

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Old 06-28-22, 10:44 AM
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I don't remember the original rims; IIRC they had red labels and were Italian, not French or English.

The problem with steel rims is that they stop VERY, VERY poorly/slowly when wet and even when damp. They're OK when dry, but unsafe, at least IMO, when wet.

I know that thousands and probably millions of miles have been ridden on steel rims. Many of us on this forum rode on steel rims for years, and we're still here to tell the tales. Nevertheless, I would not buy a bike with steel rims unless I factored the cost of good new wheels into the price I'd pay. I'd probably factor in the cost of cold-setting the rear triangle, too.
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Old 07-03-22, 03:07 AM
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I found 27" Araya wheelset with Suntour hubs, I'm thinking of buying those for my Atala, would they ride better than the Rigida's? I think I have dentical Araya rims on my Allegro club tour, I might swap them into the Atala to test before I buy, compared to my Allegro club tour though, the ride quality of the Atala is much much better, I'd rather restore and keep the Atala, it feels lighter, more nimble, less stiff and overall more fun to ride



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Old 07-03-22, 08:48 AM
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Yes those are great wheels and will ride much better and they look basically correct for the bike. Only issue is good 27inch tires are bit hard to come by right now.
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