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Old Manitou fork, or vintage?

Old 07-10-22, 03:42 PM
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Korina
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Old Manitou fork, or vintage?

I made the mistake of contacting the seller of this '95 Trek 990 and he says he has the original fork. The question is, could I get anything for the suspension fork? Is it junk, okay, or unobtanium?

Trek 990 Mt. Bike - $350 (Arcata)








bicycle frame material: steelbicycle type: mountain
brake type: v-brakes
condition: good
electric assist: none
frame size: 18 inch
handlebar type: riser
make / manufacturer: Trek
model name / number: 990
suspension: suspension fork (hardtail)
wheel size: 26 in
This in a Trek 990. With 26 inch wheel and hard tail 18 inch frame (center to top). Recently tuned-up. Shimano Deore XT hubs, cranks, derailleurs, shifters and brake levers. With Avid V-brakes, Manitou SX forks, and Ritchey megabite tires. 3x9 = 28 gears. True Temper OX Comp 111 triple butted Chrom/moly frame. $350.00 Cash only.
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Old 07-10-22, 06:23 PM
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I'm sure that others will chime, I think on Craigslist $40-75.

Thats a good price for that bike with the original hardnose fork and 3x9 updated.
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Old 07-11-22, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr. 66 View Post
I'm sure that others will chime, I think on Craigslist $40-75.

Thats a good price for that bike with the original hardnose fork and 3x9 updated.
Thanks. We'd have to sell it on eBay, as we're too small and remote; I'm guessing it'd sell for similar $$ there, which is more than I thought.
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Old 07-11-22, 08:40 PM
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350 is way too much. Top of the line then, but now not worth much more than the Trek 830 at the other end of their spectrum. Just good for riding around. You cannot go mountain biking on that any more. Yes, the Manitou could bring 50-100 bucks. I'm surprised what people get for old 26" wheel suspension forks now, but then I bought a whole Bontrager Privateer a couple of months ago, just to catch the rockshox Quadra fork for another old mountain bike I have.
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Old 07-12-22, 06:53 AM
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Actual recent Ebay selling prices for Manitou SX range from $20 to $140. It all depends on the condition of the internals. There was one that sold for $249 but it was a rebuilt carbon version.
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Old 07-12-22, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by AngryFrankie View Post
You cannot go mountain biking on that any more.
You could back then. Mountains may have changed more than I realized
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Old 07-12-22, 09:38 AM
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For nicer 90's MTB's it seems nice good condition forks suspension or rigid are about the hardest part to get if you need one. So I would say a $75-100 if in real good condition.
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Old 07-12-22, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by martl View Post
You could back then. Mountains may have changed more than I realized
Ha ha! Luckily the mountains are the same, but the trails have changed. I find myself sometimes seeing something coming up on a trail and suck in my breath and grit my teeth, and then 29" wheels roll over it like wasn't even there. I guess you could call it "26 inch wheel brain!"
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Old 07-12-22, 11:48 AM
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I have done some heavy MTB biking on a 1970's resto mod SS 70's gravel grinder. So yes you don't need the latest or greatest you just need a trail and good functioning bike.
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Old 07-12-22, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by martl View Post
You could back then. Mountains may have changed more than I realized
It's not the mountains that have changed, it's mountain biking; technology (and big wheels) have replaced skill, so bike riders need rougher trails to get that thrill.
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Old 07-12-22, 03:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
It's not the mountains that have changed, it's mountain biking; technology (and big wheels) have replaced skill, so bike riders need rougher trails to get that thrill.
Interesting theory, but not really what I have experienced. I took my 20+ year old former XC race bike - complete with old Manitou fork and v-brakes - stripped it down to a singlespeed, and rode it on the roads and trails I used to ride on when it was current technology. With the exception of a couple of spots where my 53-year-old self isn't willing to risk his body the way I did 20+ years ago, and a couple of short hills that are too steep for the gearing, I've been able to ride 99% of the same roads and trails this bike used to ride.


I rode with a buddy on one of our favorite trails in the local mountains that includes a wide variety of challenges, including some extended sections of black-diamond rated singletrack. The only time I had to walk sections he was able to ride was when I was limited by my lack of gears. His bike is a little different than mine.


Some guys on newer FS bikes are faster than me on downhills. Fine. I'm not trying to be the fastest jackass on the hill any more. That said, it's quite satisfying to pass those same guys on long climbs.

I have a newer 29" hardtail, too. It sure rolls nice. It gets over things a bit easier with the big wheels. However, there are some tech sections where I'm more comfortable and confident with the maneuverability of 26" wheels. The idea that you can't ride a 26" wheel MTB in the mountains any more is rubbish. It's going to have the same capabilities as it always has.

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Old 07-13-22, 01:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
It's not the mountains that have changed, it's mountain biking; technology (and big wheels) have replaced skill, so bike riders need rougher trails to get that thrill.
We are dangerously close to drifting OT here but that is my impression as well, without the dig at skill; dont believe the level of skill changed. Modern MTB design, wider tires, suspension with more travel, definitely allows to negotiate much rougher terrain, i see people riding sections seemingly effortless, where i on my 20+ old gear have long before dismounted. i ride a hardtail from 1996 with a modern fork "shortened" to 80mm travel, and a 2002 Rocky Mountain Element.
On a recent week-long trip, i used that Rocky while my two companions used modern bikes. Neither of us noticed much of a significant advantage for the 29" up- or downhill on the sort of trails we rode. What level of difficulty each of us *dared to* ride downhill or *could ride* uphill, or what speed was achieved downhill, pretty much was the same as when we rode together 20 years ago, all on old school 26" rides.
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Old 07-13-22, 03:20 PM
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Fair enough; I'm not and never have been a mountain biker; my view is entirely from the outside and I may be subscribing to the wrong mtb YT channels. It just seems that the goal is still the same; get that adrenaline rush by throwing yourself down a hill as fast as you can over the roughest terrain you can handle. Technology has changed how rough that terrain is.

Originally Posted by martl View Post
We are dangerously close to drifting OT here but that is my impression as well, without the dig at skill; dont believe the level of skill changed. Modern MTB design, wider tires, suspension with more travel, definitely allows to negotiate much rougher terrain, i see people riding sections seemingly effortless, where i on my 20+ old gear have long before dismounted. i ride a hardtail from 1996 with a modern fork "shortened" to 80mm travel, and a 2002 Rocky Mountain Element.
On a recent week-long trip, i used that Rocky while my two companions used modern bikes. Neither of us noticed much of a significant advantage for the 29" up- or downhill on the sort of trails we rode. What level of difficulty each of us *dared to* ride downhill or *could ride* uphill, or what speed was achieved downhill, pretty much was the same as when we rode together 20 years ago, all on old school 26" rides.
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Old 07-14-22, 12:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Fair enough; I'm not and never have been a mountain biker; my view is entirely from the outside and I may be subscribing to the wrong mtb YT channels. It just seems that the goal is still the same; get that adrenaline rush by throwing yourself down a hill as fast as you can over the roughest terrain you can handle. Technology has changed how rough that terrain is.
that is part of mountainbiking, but not all of it. i like it as a way to enhance hiking, so to speak - go beautiful routes to magnificent places that would be too long to hike, or too tedious. a multi-day alpine traverse is a very special experience and people did this with the material available in the 90ies. sure a modern full suspension bike opens a few more options for the route. on the other hand you go uphill as much as you go down, so its a matter of balancing that out. i rather have a bike that allows me to climb easily over one that allows me to ride more challenging downhill sections without dismounting, and that means a climbing friendly geometry/position and low weight. my old Rocky had both and getting the same on a modern bike would cost a lot of money without improving much. i think, neither modern brakes nor modern suspension makes much of a difference at the level of skill i can and the level of risk i'm willing to take. i may rent a modern ride some day to find out if i'm grossly misjudging it.
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Old 07-14-22, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Fair enough; I'm not and never have been a mountain biker; my view is entirely from the outside and I may be subscribing to the wrong mtb YT channels. It just seems that the goal is still the same; get that adrenaline rush by throwing yourself down a hill as fast as you can over the roughest terrain you can handle. Technology has changed how rough that terrain is.
The goals are different for different people. People posting their videos to YouTube are probably a higher percentage of max adrenalin-rush seekers than the average MTB population. There was a time when I was young, lean, fast, and brave that I regularly pushed the limits of my bike handling skills. At 53, I care a lot more about maintaining my structural integrity, and making it back to my family after the ride. While going downhill in demanding terrain is still fun, my joy is in doing it clean, rather than just going as fast as possible. I like narrow, twisty, up and down trails, with a few rocky technical bits for spice, but nothing where a mistake could result in a drop to my death (there are trails like that in my 'hood). When I was young - and still today - I consider myself to have much more of an XC racer's mindset than that of a DH racer.
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