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Nishiki FFS National - Looking for more info and estimate of value

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Nishiki FFS National - Looking for more info and estimate of value

Old 08-05-22, 06:42 PM
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uglyhippo0
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Nishiki FFS National - Looking for more info and estimate of value

Hello,


I recently acquired the Nishiki FFS National shown in the photos in the .zip file (my .jpg files refused to upload). Its serial number is CG10553, from another thread in this forum that puts it in the 1977 manufacturing year for the Canadian market. Other than that, I am pretty clueless about the bike. I've exhausted my google skills and have read many articles on Nishiki and other models but I can't find other references to the FFS National. Stickers on the frame indicate Toshiba 555 Tubing, Japan, and made by Kawamura. The bike has minimal signs of surface rust, and (what I assume to be) the original seat is in good shape. The wheels are 27" x 1 1/4" and the standover height is 32.5".


Any additional information on the bike would be much appreciated.


Any estimates of value would be very much appreciated.


Cheers
Attached Files
File Type: zip
Nishiki FFS National.zip (11.16 MB, 3 views)
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Old 08-05-22, 08:54 PM
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Pic assist.

Here's a good T-Mar quote from another thread:

Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Shields was a Canadian bicycle distributor established by Harry D. Shields and later taken over by his son Lorne. During the early 1970s bicycle boom they were the major Canadian distributor of high grade bicycle parts (Campagnolo, Huret, MAFAC, Shimano, Simplex, SunTour, Stronglight, TA, etc), as well as distributing bicycle brands such as Cinelli, Falcon, Jeunet and Peugeot. In the late 1970s they became the Canadian distributor for Nishiki, which were labelled Shields Nishiki, as well as establishing their own brand.
The bike is low-end (steel rims, cottered cranks, stamped dropouts, etc) but it's also in good cosmetic shape, so maybe you could get $100 US for it.







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Old 08-05-22, 11:09 PM
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Thank you

Thank you for replying.
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Old 08-06-22, 04:15 PM
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The FFS stands for Front Freewheel System, a technology introduced by Shimano for the 1977 model year. When derailleur equipped bicycle sales skyrocketed in the early 1970s, many owners had problems shifting. FFS was intended to address this issue. By installing a freewheel mechanism from the front chainwheels, the rear wheel continued to drive the chain even when coasting or back pedaling, allowing shifts to be executed under these situations. The rear sprockets also had a freewheeI, though it had higher resistance than the FFS and was called a friction freewheel. This way, if the if the rider got a pant leg caught in the chain, the rear sprockets would free.hwheel.

It may seem strange these days but many cyclists new to derailleurs had problems with pedaling while removing one hand from the bars to move the shift lever, which was common on the 10 speeds in fashion at the time. As a result FFS was spec'd almost exclusively on entry level models, such as the subject bicycle. However, it was never a big seller and was quietly discontinued in the early 1980s. The problems were twofold; it added extra cost to a bicycle that people were considering due to low cost and people were reluctant to admit that were intimidated by derailleurs. There were so many entry level 10 speeds that were never shifted after they left the salesroom. Many became garage and basement queens after a handful of rides.
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Old 08-11-22, 09:32 PM
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Thank you for replying.

Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
The FFS stands for Front Freewheel System, a technology introduced by Shimano for the 1977 model year. When derailleur equipped bicycle sales skyrocketed in the early 1970s, many owners had problems shifting. FFS was intended to address this issue. By installing a freewheel mechanism from the front chainwheels, the rear wheel continued to drive the chain even when coasting or back pedaling, allowing shifts to be executed under these situations. The rear sprockets also had a freewheeI, though it had higher resistance than the FFS and was called a friction freewheel. This way, if the if the rider got a pant leg caught in the chain, the rear sprockets would free.hwheel.

It may seem strange these days but many cyclists new to derailleurs had problems with pedaling while removing one hand from the bars to move the shift lever, which was common on the 10 speeds in fashion at the time. As a result FFS was spec'd almost exclusively on entry level models, such as the subject bicycle. However, it was never a big seller and was quietly discontinued in the early 1980s. The problems were twofold; it added extra cost to a bicycle that people were considering due to low cost and people were reluctant to admit that were intimidated by derailleurs. There were so many entry level 10 speeds that were never shifted after they left the salesroom. Many became garage and basement queens after a handful of rides.





Thank you for this information, I bought it with the intention of trying to sell for a profit but this is now my bike. Cheers!
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Old 08-12-22, 08:07 AM
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FFS = avoid. Little to no value. Parts are unobtainium. Heavy, entry level, plus non-standard parts.

I buy stuff to resell all of the time. The more I know, the better I do. I sometimes take a gamble on an item, sometimes it works, other times not so much.

I just bought a sweater, possum fur/marino wool mix. How bizarre is that? I just thought, "hey maybe this has value." About half the time I am wrong, and I donate stuff off, but the other half of the time I do well enough to make taking a risk profitable. Sweater should bring $50+, so that time it worked. But I have a box full of mistakes too!


Back to FFS, they use unique, solid wire shifter cables, similar to a lawn mower. Anyway, I came across a box of NOS cables. Paid $30 for the box, gross sales were $1000. So if I see the cables, I'm a buyer for sure!

Yes to below, only the rear derailleur used solid cables.

Last edited by wrk101; 08-13-22 at 09:46 PM.
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Old 08-13-22, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Back to FFS, they use unique, solid wire shifter cables, similar to a lawn mower. Anyway, I came across a box of NOS cables. Paid $30 for the box, gross sales were $1000. So if I see the cables, I'm a buyer for sure!
Only the positron derailleur ones used a solid wire. I've had a number come through with standard rear derailleurs on a FFS front. They all did come with the freewheel that had cogs that could freewheel individually if enough friction was overcome.
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