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Worth fixing up this Peugeot?

Old 12-11-11, 12:22 PM
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todayilearned
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Worth fixing up this Peugeot?

So recently I've been looking into vintage bikes just because of how amazing they look. Unfortunately I never get to snag one due to my weird work schedule. No one ever wants to meet me at 3am to show me their bike and they're always gone before I get a chance to see them.

I've missed out on some great deals but when I saw this on CL right near my workplace and had $80 in my wallet I decided to pick it up. Once I rode it I knew I definitely wanted it. The feel is just completely different. From the research I looked up it's a lower end 80's model.

I'm not looking to flip this or make any profit. I'm was expecting to lose money from the beginning since it's a learning process but after a closer inspection I'm wondering if it's even worth starting up? It's a bit more abused than I thought.

The previous owner mentioned she had changed the chain and RD (I think she meant FD?). The chain and cassette look to be rusted. There are small spots of rust around the frame. Tires are cracked so I guess tires/tubes need to be replaced. The brake lever on the right side is missing.

I probably overpaid at $80. I was planning on spending MAX $250 in fixing this up. Most of the benefit of fixing this up would be the learning aspect.

- Would I be able to fix this within budget and is it worth pursuing or should I just call it a $80 loss.
- How should I go about starting to fix this up?

Of course the day after I buy this a nice FUJI Berkeley comes up on CL for $140. Looks to be in ready to ride condition. https://tucson.craigslist.org/bik/2737834176.html









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Old 12-11-11, 01:57 PM
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You've already bought it, might as well fix it up. I don't know what you had in mind, there's noway you need to spend $250. Replace the tires, tubes, Chain, cables and it looks like it needs a new saddle.

Don't worry about the missing brake lever, instead remove the left one. Those turkey levers aren't to popular around here. The freewheel looks OK, clean it with a wire brush. The spots of rust on the FD are nothing. Clean them off with a wadded up piece of aluminum foil and WD-40 or lemon juice.

Do you plan on servicing the bearings? You'll need some tools. Cone wrenches, crank puller, lock ring wrench and maybe a pin spanner. You'll also need a chain tool to replace the chain. Sheldon Brown will very helpful on how to do the work. https://sheldonbrown.com/

If you shop around on-line, I bet you could get everything you need including tools for under $150. I think it's a great project to learn on

Good Luck
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Old 12-11-11, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by brian3069 View Post
Don't worry about the missing brake lever, instead remove the left one. Those turkey levers aren't to popular around here. The freewheel looks OK, clean it with a wire brush. The spots of rust on the FD are nothing. Clean them off with a wadded up piece of aluminum foil and WD-40 or lemon juice.

Do you plan on servicing the bearings? You'll need some tools. Cone wrenches, crank puller, lock ring wrench and maybe a pin spanner. You'll also need a chain tool to replace the chain. Sheldon Brown will very helpful on how to do the work. https://sheldonbrown.com/

If you shop around on-line, I bet you could get everything you need including tools for under $150. I think it's a great project to learn on
+1

I'd say $80 is a fair price for that bike. It's probably as good or better than the Fuji you posted, if in a little worse shape. Chain looks fine. Dump it in a bottle of mineral spirits, let dry, oil, and it'll probably be good to go. As long as it doesnt have any stiff links it doesn't look rusted to me. Tires don't look terrible either but if you want to replace them it's your call. As long as they're not bulging they're probably fine. Tubes? Don't bother replacing those if they hold air. I've never seen a tube "go bad" from age.

I would definitely replace the cables and housing, service the wheel bearings, bottom bracket, and headset.
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Old 12-11-11, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by todayilearned View Post
had $80 in my wallet I decided to pick it up The previous owner mentioned she had changed the chain and RD (I think she meant FD?).
The RD is worth what you paid for it let me know if you need a FD...
Nice Crank and chain guard vintage cool...
Grease it and ride it...
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Old 12-11-11, 04:27 PM
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+1, it was worth the $80, but I wouldn't be sinking $250 into it. Regarding the chain and freewheels, I'd replace them on any personal rider, regardless of the condition. For $20 you can buy a HyperGlide compatible chain and freewheel that will vastly improve shifting performance. If the old stuff is still usable, relegate them to the storage pile pending a resale.
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Old 12-11-11, 05:30 PM
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Location is everything to bike pricing, but for my area (south florida), you did very well. It looks like it'll clean up okay and will be a great bike to learn wrenching on. My suggestion: if the first chain bath is really gritty, give it another wash and shake with fresh solvent, I've been cleaning alot of old chains that take about three episodes before they're clean enuff.

If you don't find tools used locally or want to buy new, the online retailers will be hungry for business after the holiday rush is over, my Performance toolkit has served me very well for 8 years now.
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Old 12-11-11, 05:33 PM
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that would be a steal here, and since it's your personal bike with no interest in profit do whatever you want with it and don't be concerned unless you go over what in your own mind is your budget. New chain/tires is cheap, new freewheel is also cheap, maybe spot clean the rust on the frame if it's bad enough and then customize over time to your needs.
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Old 12-11-11, 05:40 PM
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That's a nice early 80's (late 70's) Peugeot...looks like the Course model, but not sure. Carbolite 103 was good Cro-Mo steel, not 531, but gives a good fairly lightweight ride that is nice for beating around town and touring. The RD looks to be an SX-610, and excellent derailleur (way better than the Prestige). Nice Atax stem and Philippe bars. Looks good to ride with a bearing clean/lube/adjust and new tires. Well worth what you paid for it. Could easily be resold for $200-300 in an active bike market like the SF Bay Area.
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Old 12-11-11, 08:20 PM
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id say you did pretty well for 80 clams. Any bike with forged DOs and alloy wheels/bars is worth that. Grab a set of downtube shifters (I've got a set of once used NOS clamp on shimano 600ex shifters) and you'll be on your way. That is a nice rear D.
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Old 12-11-11, 08:31 PM
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Admittedly I was a bit pessimistic at first but after reading up a bit I'm sure the end result will be good. Thanks for the wealth of information guys. All my questions were pretty much answered.

I'm hoping to get the following done on the bike before new year's:

- New tires. DONE
The tires definitely need to be replaced. They have tears in the sidewall and are missing pieces where the threads are showing. I'm not sure how much of concern this is but better safe than sorry.

Would these work: https://www.biketiresdirect.com/produ...6-27-inch-tire

- Saddle. DONE
Wish it wasn't in such bad condition since I really liked it.

- Clean Chain. DONE
Self explanatory.

- New cables and housing.
Old housings are stripped in places and look like they're rusting. I'll redo the wiring just to learn how it's done.

- Clean slight rust spots on FD DONE
Self explanatory.

- Clean up wheels DONE DONE

I'm a bit stuck on the freewheel. By freewheel are you guys referring to the cassette+freewheel mechanism or just the ratcheting part? I would probably like to fix it up to learn at first but how would I go about replacing it later on?

What are terms I should search for on the forums. I'm sure this stuff has been covered numerous times but I don't know the terminology to look up the stuff.

Last edited by todayilearned; 01-08-12 at 12:56 PM.
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Old 12-12-11, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by todayilearned View Post
I'm a bit stuck on the freewheel. By freewheel are you guys referring to the cassette+freewheel mechanism or just the ratcheting part? I would probably like to fix it up to learn at first but how would I go about replacing it later on?

What are terms I should search for on the forums. I'm sure this stuff has been covered numerous times but I don't know the terminology to look up the stuff.
Your bike should have a 6-speed freewheel (as opposed to a cassette). You have to remove the lockring (special tool required) and use a chainwhip or pipewrench to spin off the freewheel assembly from the hub (it's RH treaded) while holding the wheel steady. But if it's working I'd just leave it on the hub when you perform the cleanup and lube, until you get more experience.

Go to Shedlon Brown's site for a veritable encyclopedia of bike facts and lore, and start with a review of the general stuff, like bike anatomy, parts function, and terminology.

Nothing wrong with those stem shifters (they are actually unusual in that color scheme) and some folks prefer them for touring and riding in a more upright posture while commuting. The crank's outer chainring guard is a nice feature for commuting, but some folks don't like them.

If the bike is a good fit for you, you'll love the ride for commuting and casual road touring. Fit it up with a nice lightweight road rack (e.g. Axiom) and panniers, and don't forget lights.
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Old 12-12-11, 07:54 PM
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You scored a nice Pug there - My guess is an '82 PH10.
Congrats!

You won't need a chain whip to remove the FW - just the appropriate FW tool. (You can look up the one you need on the Park Tool website, then order it along with a new hyperglide Sunlite freewheel ($14) and a KMC 6-speed chain ($5) from Niagara Cycle. (Always replace a chain when you install a new FW))

For tires, I recommend Panaracer Paselas - some excellent prices available on the 'net.

I did not see servicing the bearings on your list of to-do's. This is the FIRST thing you should do (aside from safe tires of course) if you don't want to damage the races. The hubs, headset and bottom bracket bearings will require some simple bike-specific tools, but they will pay for themselves the first time you use them.
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Old 12-12-11, 08:07 PM
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In my eyes it's almost always worth it to fix up any old roadie, that is if it's not completely dead. Great find indeed! I've had about 5 different Peugeots already, they really catch my eyes when i'm looking for a new fixer upper (especially the 80's models) The 70's models are very nice to look at but a headache to find and fix old french parts. One thing that caught my eye about your bike is those really cool Atax Philippe franco italia bars, they are not worth much but awesome looking set of bars. I just got a pair off a complete 80' Peugeot Competition i'm fixing up to ride for myself(see some of it here: https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...ay!?highlight=). Good luck with that project, looks like a great everyday rider!
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Old 12-13-11, 05:29 AM
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As someone new to the interest in vintage bicycles, you do have lots of interesting learning opportunities in front of you. Perhaps I can help a wee bit by inviting you to have a look through MY "TEN SPEEDS", a website designed to help new people come up to speed quickly when seeking information regarding vintage bicycle. Hope you find time to visit and hope also that it is a help.

The bike you have looks to be a Peugeot Sprint. The Peugeot Course will have a forged rear drop with integral derailleur hanger, the Sprint has the stamped or pressed drop and also features the integral hanger.
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Old 12-21-11, 04:27 PM
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Hate to bump this again but I need a little help. Got the tires/tubes off and replaced them. Cleaned up the wheels so now they rotate for a few mins nicely. Before they were a tad clunky.

I had to rip off the old rim tape because it was so old. It was "caked" on to the tires and the rear one felt like paper. I think the previous owner left this out in the rain a few times.

I have credit at Amazon.com and PerformanceBike so if you have recommendations for the following please let me know:

- Need new Rim tape.
- Need a good chain tool.
- Saddle for around $20
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Old 12-21-11, 04:39 PM
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If you catch it on sale, the Spin Doctor chain tool at Performance is OK, not great. At regular price, I would just go with the Park tool CT-3. Its the best IMHO. Might be able to get Performance to match some of the other on line sources (around $23).

Rim tape, just pick some up at Performance. Lots of opinions out there which one is the best, do a search of the forums if you want to go that route. I bought some plastic/nylon rim tape at Performance (Forte branded?) and it worked fine), they sell it for $3.99. Or the cloth tape for $5.99 (Nashbar has their version on sale right now for $2.49 a pair).

Saddle is all personal choice. What I like you might hate, and so on.

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Old 12-21-11, 05:04 PM
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If you need a chainwhip to remove the freewheel you can make one easily enough from $3-4 worth of steel from a hardware store and an old piece of chain. Sure beats paying $25 for one.
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Old 12-21-11, 05:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Stealthammer View Post
If you need a chainwhip to remove the freewheel you can make one easily enough from $3-4 worth of steel from a hardware store and an old piece of chain. Sure beats paying $25 for one.
Chain whips are not used for removing thread-on freewheels. Only cassette freehubs require chainwhips for removal.
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Old 12-21-11, 05:46 PM
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Thinking of picking up the Park Tool CT-3 but I want to make sure it will work with my chain.

My chain is 6 speed correct? The description says 7/8/9/10 speed compatible. Will it make a difference?
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Old 12-21-11, 05:49 PM
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Originally Posted by todayilearned View Post
Thinking of picking up the Park Tool CT-3 but I want to make sure it will work with my chain.

My chain is 6 speed correct? The description says 7/8/9/10 speed compatible. Will it make a difference?
It'll work just fine. Chain should be 6 speed, but and 5/6/7/8 speed chain will work.
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Old 01-08-12, 12:55 PM
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Can someone help me find a tutorial on how to change the brake cables? I'm unfamiliar with these levers and don't know what to search for.

Also how difficult would it be to lower the stem?
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Old 01-08-12, 10:15 PM
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Lower the stem: just loosen the one bolt (most likely 6mm allen head) on the top of the stem, i.e. not the one holding the bars in place! There are only two so you'll quickly find out which one it is. If the stem doesn't come loose from loosening that bolt tap the top of the bolt lightly with a hammer.

Once you loosen the cable from the brake calipers you'll see how they come out the levers. Non-aero levers are easy, aero levers can be more tricky. Just don't lose any of the small parts! Great article on cable routing/installation: https://sheldonbrown.com/cables.html
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Old 01-09-12, 01:15 PM
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One other thought: you can probably improve the braking performance considerably by updating both levers and calipers. Bikeisland.com sells a 'budget' kit of Tektro brakes which include aero levers with nice fat grips and double-pivot calipers, cables too I think (?) for about $45...a screaming deal. They are 'recessed' brake fittings though, requiring the mounting hole on the fork and brake bridge to be drilled out slightly on one side. Taking a drill to your bike may be scarey (and I wouldn't do it to a valuable vintage one) but it's not a big deal. This is by no means a necessity but if you were looking at buying new cables, new brake pads, etc you might consider it. The aero handgrips can make a difference in ride comfort too.
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Old 01-29-12, 12:40 PM
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Old 01-29-12, 04:38 PM
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An 82 PH10S!
I had the exact model bike in Pearl white in the 80's when I started really getting into sport cycling during my early college days.
It was my first "real" bike and I modded it up quite a bit so in the end I pretty much had a beginner race bike.
Things I did were:
Replaced the crank with a Stronglight 104bis.
Installed calmp-on Simplex down tube retrofriction shifters
Changed out the rims to Ambrosio elites
Put on narrow, foldable Specialized Turbo S tires
Put on Weinamnn model 405 brakes with the quick release levers at the calipers
Removed the "safety brake levers from the Weinmann lever bodies
Dumped all the reflectors on the bike
Installed a really kight REG aluminum bottle cage
Changed out the Lyotard rat traps to Atom or Maillard (I can't remember exactly) aluminum quills with Christophe clips and straps
Changed out the saddle to a Concor Supercorsa.
Cahnged out the seatpost to an aluminum micro adjustable one
IIRC, From something like 27 pounds I think I got the bike down to 25 or 24ish from the lighter pedals, crankset, shifters, wheels tire and seatpost/saddle, so the bike accelerated a bit quicker and climbed much better.
What makes these PH10S's and similar model Peugeots worth modding up is the really nice ride the Carbolite frame provided. It had a really nice stiff feel that transmitted your pedalling force to forward speed very nicely. It even "sang" on road at speed, something better experienced than described. The quality of the paint and graphics (specially in the Pearl White scheme) was also pretty god considering they are lower model bikes. A lot of other cyclists I encountered when riding back then were fooled to think I had a much more expensvie bike when they first saw it.
It's really nice to see that people still love riding and modding up these lower model Peugeots after all these years!
Congratulations on the successful mods and may that PH10 provide you with many enjoyable miles on the roads as mine did!

Chombi

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