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1980's Univega Gran Turismo

Old 03-20-13, 01:58 PM
  #1  
Tcaa
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1980's Univega Gran Turismo

I know there are a few Univegas on this forum already but I wanted and estimate for my bike in my area. I live in San Diego the bike is probably a 1983 model from what I've read up on. It's a 58cm bike with a stand over height of 33 1/2 inches. The bike has brand new strada forte tires and new tubes. The rims have been tried and the gears and brakes tuned up. The brakes and chain are 30 years old but they still work fine.
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Old 03-20-13, 10:21 PM
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FastJake
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Nice old Univega. Cantilever brakes are a huge plus, especially on a bike of this age. It doesn't have the bar-end shifters, but you still need to market this as a touring bike to get the most money out of it.

$300 minimum. Maybe $400 in your market? I don't know, that might be too much.

+1 to below. Bike is nice, but the pictures are really poor. You'll have to take much better photos and provide a good description to get full value out of it.

Last edited by FastJake; 03-21-13 at 07:14 PM.
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Old 03-21-13, 12:28 AM
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Thanks for the insight. I really like this bike but its a bit small for me so it would be best suited for new owner. I will probably post it for 350 or so and hope for the best.
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Old 03-21-13, 05:45 AM
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oddjob2
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Take some outdoor photos in the bright CA sunshine. Shoot from a lower angle on both sides. That will help you maximize interest. The above photos are a turnoff.
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Old 03-21-13, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by oddjob2 View Post
Take some outdoor photos in the bright CA sunshine. Shoot from a lower angle on both sides. That will help you maximize interest. The above photos are a turnoff.
Also, the detail pictures should be of the major, high wear components, such as the crankset/front derailleur and rear derailleur/freewheel.

Lower both the stem and saddle, as both look dangerously high and throw off the proportions of the bicycle. Lower the saddle so that just about an inch of bare post is showing below the flutes. Tilt the saddle nose down a bit. It looks nose-up and uncomfortable. Lower the stem so it's about an inch lower than the saddle. A lot of these minor things make a big difference with respect to first impressions. While many buyers can't identify exactly what is wrong, they know when something doesn't look right.

Installing brake lever hoods would be a big plus. Generally the return is greater than the investment, provided you can do it yourself.
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Old 03-23-13, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Also, the detail pictures should be of the major, high wear components, such as the crankset/front derailleur and rear derailleur/freewheel.

Lower both the stem and saddle, as both look dangerously high and throw off the proportions of the bicycle. Lower the saddle so that just about an inch of bare post is showing below the flutes. Tilt the saddle nose down a bit. It looks nose-up and uncomfortable. Lower the stem so it's about an inch lower than the saddle. A lot of these minor things make a big difference with respect to first impressions. While many buyers can't identify exactly what is wrong, they know when something doesn't look right.

Installing brake lever hoods would be a big plus. Generally the return is greater than the investment, provided you can do it yourself.

Yeah I'm 6'7" so that's why the seat is so high haha. I wouldn't have thought about all those what are not so minor details. I will take some pics today and post them. Lets see if I can get this right! indoor pictures with good lighting seems to be preferential.how about background?
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Old 03-23-13, 01:32 PM
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Outdoor pictures turn out a lot better for me, unless you are good with indoor lighting (from the OP, I would say no.)

Simple, clean background. In front of a brick wall/building usually looks good.
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Old 03-23-13, 10:19 PM
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Take Two

Okay well heres take number two. I was able to implement some of your ideas. I lowered the seat to about an inch of the tube showing, took detailed pics of the crankset, lowered the vantage point, lowered the stem and took pics outside. I know the background isn't ideal and the tires in the grass and leaves dont help. I just got home from work/studying and I was running out of daylight. I plan to take some more pics with a simple background with better lighting, this is more of and intermediate step just to see if I am on the right track with your input.


Thanks again

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Last edited by Tcaa; 03-23-13 at 10:35 PM.
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Old 03-23-13, 10:55 PM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
Also, the detail pictures should be of the major, high wear components, such as the crankset/front derailleur and rear derailleur/freewheel.

Lower both the stem and saddle, as both look dangerously high and throw off the proportions of the bicycle. Lower the saddle so that just about an inch of bare post is showing below the flutes. Tilt the saddle nose down a bit. It looks nose-up and uncomfortable. Lower the stem so it's about an inch lower than the saddle. A lot of these minor things make a big difference with respect to first impressions. While many buyers can't identify exactly what is wrong, they know when something doesn't look right.

Installing brake lever hoods would be a big plus. Generally the return is greater than the investment, provided you can do it yourself.
+1 on Lowering and setting the seat and stem to ideal position for frame size this just makes a classic bike look %50 better and it costs nothing. By doing this simple thing I have flipped a bike for $100 profit at the flea market in 2hrs.
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