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Flandria bike info needed

Old 05-29-13, 12:45 PM
  #1  
tib888
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Flandria bike info needed

I just cleaned up this old Flandria bike.
Can anyone give me some more info? It's been standing in our shed for over 15 years.

The rear wheel was slightly crooked because one of the spokes is broken, but i got it pretty much straight by tightening the surrounding spokes.
Is it safe to drive with one of the spokes broken?

It has 2x5 gears (Simplex) and the decals show it is a model 1976 Freddy Maertens.
Up to what year did they make these bikes?

Framesize is 55.

Is it possible to determine from the pictures what parts are original and wich one are not?

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Old 05-29-13, 01:09 PM
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You would be well advised to replace the spoke, as things willonly get worse. The subject bicycle celebrates Maertens 1976 World Championship victory so it is probably no older than a 1977 model. He left the Flandria team to ride for Benotto in 1980, so the bicycle almost certainly precedes that. It is an entry level lmodel, rare but not valuable.

Edit: We'd need close-ups of the components and/or brands and model descriptions to tell what is OEM. However, the front derailleur does not appear to match thee rear rear derailleur and shifters, which appear tobe Simplex. Most entry level nicycles during this period used center-pull brakes, so the side-pull brakes are suspect.

Last edited by T-Mar; 05-29-13 at 01:16 PM.
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Old 05-29-13, 01:23 PM
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thanks. I'll try to take more detailed pictures in the next couple of days. Rain is pouring down now here in Belgium ...
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Old 05-29-13, 03:11 PM
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Also if you do a search for Flandria here on the forums there have been several lengthy threads on these bikes as of late. The bike in question is indead an entry level model circa 1977-1980. These had nice basic lugged steel frames and basic components wheels. They are rare in the US but are fairly common in Beligium and Northern Europe. A good basic boom era bike but not very valuable around $150 or in good condition
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Old 05-30-13, 02:58 PM
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Does anyone know if it is possible to install a modern group (like shimano tiagra 4600) on a classic bike like this?
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Old 05-31-13, 06:25 PM
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Flandria bike info needed

Thats an awesome bike. From a great period in cycling. Clean it up, tune it up, and go. I like it set up the way it is. I want one in my size.
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Old 05-31-13, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Poor candidate: low end/entry level frame, claw RD hanger, etc. Sure, its very possible, will cost serious money. Entry level back then was really low end.
Originally Posted by big chainring View Post
Thats an awesome bike. From a great period in cycling. Clean it up, tune it up, and go. I like it set up the way it is. I want one in my size.

One man's steak is another man's hamburger!
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Old 06-02-13, 04:30 AM
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As promised, some more pictures ...
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Old 06-02-13, 04:38 AM
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Old 06-02-13, 06:46 AM
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As stated earlier, the only obvious replaced component is the Sachs-Huret front derailleur, as the original would have been Simplex to match the front derailleur and shifters. The brakes may or may not be original. They were available during this period but other Flandria with MAFAC center-pull brakes have surfaced and this was a more common pairing during the era. The loss of the bar tape could be an indicator that the brakeset was replaced but it could also be co-incidence.

There are some clues to the age. The handlebar is dated 1975 and the serial number is 768244. It's fairly common practice for the first digit to represent the year . However, in this case, it could also be the first two digits, but that would indicate a maximum annual capacity of 9,999 frames which is quite small for a full range manufacturer that sponsored a pro team. I expect the handlebar would have been updated to a 1976 version to celebrate Maertens victory that year, but this could just represent poor stock rotation, which was fairly common on the European factories. Regardless, I think it is fairly safe to limit the model year to 1976 or 1977.
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Old 06-03-13, 02:00 AM
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You mean the loss of the tape around the steering?
I did that, because I switched te brakes. the front brake was on the right and the rear one on the left. I'm used to having this the other way around so I changed this. The tape was in terrible condition anyway.
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Old 06-03-13, 02:01 AM
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The serial number is 766244 by the way
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Old 06-04-13, 01:54 AM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Poor candidate: low end/entry level frame, claw RD hanger, etc. Sure, its very possible, will cost serious money. Entry level back then was really low end. Entry level road bikes have improved a lot.

The more resourceful you are, the less it will cost. I have done it many times, but I start with a higher quality frame.
What problems will I encounter then?
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Old 06-04-13, 06:10 AM
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First step be to determine if it uses French threading. Given the age and origin it could be English or French threaded. I see a GB stem, so lets hope it's English. Shimano and most other manufacturers no longer support French threading, so it can become problematic to get replacement parts like bottom brackets and headsets. They're out there but generally have to be ordered and can get expensive. French bicycles also use smaller diameter tubing which requires smaller front derailleur clamps (or shimming) smaller diameter seat posts and smaller diameter handlebar stems (or sanding).

Check the threading on the fixed (drive side) bottom bracket cup. An English cup will be left hand threaded while a French cup will have right hand threads.

Beyond that, all vintage frames will have some compatibility issues. The biggest is probably the rear hub width. It's 120mm or most boom era models, but 130mm or most modern bicycles. You'll have to spread the frame's rear trangle and realign the dropouts.

The other common problem is brake mounting. Most modern brakesets use shorter mounting bolts with recessed nuts, so you often have to drill mounting holes and obtain longer collar nuts. A lot of modern brakes may not have the necessary reach to the rims, especially if you also convert to the smaller, more common 700C wheels.

While the problems are not unsurmountable you will spend a lot of time and money, especially if the threading turns out to be French.
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Old 06-04-13, 06:50 AM
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tib888
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
First step be to determine if it uses French threading. Given the age and origin it could be English or French threaded. I see a GB stem, so lets hope it's English. Shimano and most other manufacturers no longer support French threading, so it can become problematic to get replacement parts like bottom brackets and headsets. They're out there but generally have to be ordered and can get expensive. French bicycles also use smaller diameter tubing which requires smaller front derailleur clamps (or shimming) smaller diameter seat posts and smaller diameter handlebar stems (or sanding).

Check the threading on the fixed (drive side) bottom bracket cup. An English cup will be left hand threaded while a French cup will have right hand threads.

Beyond that, all vintage frames will have some compatibility issues. The biggest is probably the rear hub width. It's 120mm or most boom era models, but 130mm or most modern bicycles. You'll have to spread the frame's rear trangle and realign the dropouts.

The other common problem is brake mounting. Most modern brakesets use shorter mounting bolts with recessed nuts, so you often have to drill mounting holes and obtain longer collar nuts. A lot of modern brakes may not have the necessary reach to the rims, especially if you also convert to the smaller, more common 700C wheels.

While the problems are not unsurmountable you will spend a lot of time and money, especially if the threading turns out to be French.
the current wheels are 700C
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Old 06-04-13, 06:53 AM
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a piece of the rear brake, a specific bolt to connect the brake cable to the brake itself, broke last night. So it'll definately need to be replaced.
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