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Bicycle misnomenclature

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Old 06-13-18, 10:40 AM
  #251  
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
You should have written that in Nash style:

The one-L lama, he's a priest.
The two-L llama, he's a beast,
And I will bet a silk pajama
A really big fire's a three-L lllama.
Candidate for "Post of the Year".
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Old 06-13-18, 11:59 AM
  #252  
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Originally Posted by Fidbloke View Post
I suppose that 'set' means an assembly in those examples?

To me, the name for the cranks complete with chain-rings is a 'chainset'.
But I've seen somewhere that this is a British term, and not in common use on the other side of the Pond.?
Right, you say chainset, and we say crankset. You say mudguards, and we say fenders. There are a few more that don't pop to mind.
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Old 06-13-18, 12:25 PM
  #253  
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Originally Posted by dweenk View Post
Candidate for "Post of the Year".
Thanks, but the plaudit is undeserved since I merely tweaked Ogden Nash's own last line based on info in a previous post, similar to that which had also been pointed out to Nash after the original publication of his poem. He evidently had not considered "three alarmer" in time.
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Old 06-13-18, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Right, you say chainset, and we say crankset. You say mudguards, and we say fenders. There are a few more that don't pop to mind.
"Two countries separated by a common language," variously attributed to George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde and Winston Churchill.
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Old 06-13-18, 07:43 PM
  #255  
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Originally Posted by arimajol View Post
I'm sure this has been mentioned, but saying "tire" when the entire wheel is meant. Sometimes people tell me about getting a tire stolen and I always scoff at the effort needed to remove it and ask if they took the tube, too
Working at a bike shop, I hear this all the time. I think it comes from cars, which come with a "spare tire" that's actually a whole wheel.

Also, an anecdote: once had a customer come in saying his bike had been vandalized...it had been locked up in the parking garage at his condo complex, and someone went through the effort to steal the inner tubes from both wheels.....and only the inner tubes!
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Old 06-14-18, 09:59 AM
  #256  
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Only the inner tubes! OK, that's actually funny, because it's so twisted.
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Old 06-18-18, 02:23 PM
  #257  
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Referring to a bike that is no longer stock as "Custom".
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Old 06-18-18, 02:32 PM
  #258  
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Right, you say chainset, and we say crankset. You say mudguards, and we say fenders. There are a few more that don't pop to mind.

How soon you forget mechs versus derailleurs. Also, seat pins or seat pillars versus seat posts, sprints versus tubulars, etc..
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Old 06-18-18, 04:10 PM
  #259  
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How soon indeed!

They say that as we get older, the memory is the second thing to go...
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Old 06-18-18, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
How soon indeed!

They say that as we get older, the memory is the second thing to go...
And I don't remember what the first one was.
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Old 06-18-18, 07:44 PM
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In the U.K.; "Campag"
in the U.S.; "Campy"
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Old 06-18-18, 09:25 PM
  #262  
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
...seat pins or seat pillars versus seat posts...
I understood that a seat pin does not include the integrated seat clamp while a pillar or post does, and that the differences are not necessarily English versus American but that there may not be a distinction on one side of the pond or the other.
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Old 06-19-18, 06:40 AM
  #263  
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
"Two countries separated by a common language," variously attributed to George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde and Winston Churchill.
The UK and The US - 2 peoples divided by a common language.

The bicycle term that rankles me most is gooseneck. It goes back many decades and was used to describe a long tall curved stem that looked like a goose's neck. Most people that I've heard use the term haven't had much experience with modern bikes and have no idea what a stem is.

The next is hoop used to mean a rim.That's another term going back to the early days of cycling.

A Brit term that I've adopted online is kit, used to describe the paint, cable housing and bar tape on a bike, especially if it's a brand distinctive color combination. It's also used to describe cycling attire.

Mech is a little too Brit bike slang for my tastes. Blighty!

The Japanese came up with the Jinglish term high tension is to describe high tensile steel. High tension refers to high voltage electrical transmission wires strung under high tension.



The Japanese have always been proud of their English translations. They know that they butcher the meanings and usage. For example the mini muscle Datsun Z cars were called the Fair Lady Blue Bird model in Japan. That name really gets the adrenaline pumpin!



US importers used bike brand names like Kabuki (classic Japanese theater), Nishiki (silk/gold brocade fabric), Takara (plum), Azuki (sweet read bean) on Japanese made bikes.

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Old 06-19-18, 09:39 AM
  #264  
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Isn't Datsun the Japanese word for rabbit?

Speaking of Kabuki, they have to have the award for just about the coolest headbadge design ever. Let's also not forget the Shogun brand.
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Old 06-19-18, 10:46 AM
  #265  
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Originally Posted by verktyg View Post
A Brit term that I've adopted online is kit, used to describe the paint, cable housing and bar tape on a bike, especially if it's a brand distinctive color combination. It's also used to describe cycling attire.
This is new to me! Thanks.
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Old 06-19-18, 01:27 PM
  #266  
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DATSON vs. DATSUN

Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
Isn't Datsun the Japanese word for rabbit?

Speaking of Kabuki, they have to have the award for just about the coolest headbadge design ever. Let's also not forget the Shogun brand.
Here's the history of the name Datsun:

https://www.nissan-global.com/EN/HER...en_p05-01.html

The Japanese word for rabbit is Usagi. The early Datsuns had a leaping rabbit on the radiator cap. Here's a 1935 Datsun 15 showing the Usagi:






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Old 06-19-18, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by verktyg A Brit term that I've adopted online is kit, used to describe the paint, cable housing and bar tape on a bike, especially if it's a brand distinctive color combination. It's also used to describe cycling attire.
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
This is new to me! Thanks.
My 1973 Holdsworth Competetizone in "Team Kit".



The 1973 Holdsworth Campagnolo Team in "Team Kit".



A Campag rear Mech.



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