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Bicycle misnomenclature

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Old 04-16-15, 01:55 PM
  #26  
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Alloy = Aluminum. Steel(s) is(are) also an alloy...
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Old 04-16-15, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
A customer asked me to raise his chair. That was a first for me.
The one that got me was the fellow who wanted his tires to be fluffed up.
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Old 04-16-15, 05:03 PM
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Only on the BF have I seen standard bicycle framed bicycles referred to as "wedgie bikes".

[h=2]Recumbent[/h](1 Viewing)
What IS that thing?! Recumbents may be odd looking, but they have many advantages over a "wedgie" bicycle. Discuss the in's and out's recumbent lifestyle in the recumbent forum.

Even on the Recumbent forum, "normal" bicycles are referred to as DF, or diamond frames.
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Old 04-16-15, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
The one that got me was the fellow who wanted his tires to be fluffed up.

Are you sure he wasn't messing with you?

I had a bike shop boss who said, "Put some wind in those tires," but I knew he was joking.
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Old 04-16-15, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
You and I must be the same age. I was born in 1961. And yes, there was a trend of buying much too big bikes! It was sometimes an effort to keep a respectful tone when people were making decisions I would recommend against.
I have a few years on you, a late-model cassette's worth of years.

One of our rival shops at the time had a red ink stamp they used on many of the sales receipts of those big-framed bikes: "Frame size not recommended." Smart, given the potential for litigation.

Judging by the guy's manner and deportment (not that there's anything wrong with that) he was serious about the fluffing.

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Old 04-16-15, 05:18 PM
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Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post

And wonder of wonder, the bicycle manufacturing industry went over to using English measurements (mostly) instead of metric.
Sort of a mixture, but a lot of English. Read something recently which asserted that it was the Japanese copying of English standards that resulted in the mess that now exists. Had the Japanese gone full metal metric, probably the rest of the industry (except, maybe the Italians and Raleigh) would have as well.

For an example of how an industry can really scrrew up units, look at aviation. Lapse rate (for example) is spoken of as degrees C/1000 feet.
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Old 04-16-15, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by icepick_trotsky View Post
I had a recent thread about Schwinn's "tubular" wheels, which are not in fact wheels for tubular tires, but rather rolled from tubes of steel.

On wheel sizes, 29" is the same size as 28" and both are smaller than 27". Further, 26x1.25 does not equal 26x1 1/4.
And 27 and a half is smaller than 27.
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Old 04-16-15, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by rhm View Post
Agreed! I forgot to add lots of smiley faces from my post.

As for derailleur, my French is weak and I don't know exactly what the word suggests in that language, but I do know it's a French word that we use in English to refer to a specific bike component. This is the beauty of English and I'm disappointed that St. Sheldon (peace be upon him) thought to anglicize it. We don't anglicize "kindergarten" and if we did, people would ask where the garden is. Not to derail this thread, though!
I worked with a French guy who would ask me about English language/vocabulary/usage because he know that I wouldn't screw with him and give him bad words to say. One day he asked me if there was an English word for acting in a sloppy or rude manner. I don't recall exactly how he asked but it was clear that the word he was looking for was gauche. I told him so. He thought I was putting him on. Sometimes things can be confusing as with the word "eventually". In French, the word means possibly or maybe. In English, of course, it means at some time in the indefinite future. So, if your boss is French and asks if you're going to do something, it's best to not say "eventually", even if that's what you mean.
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Old 04-16-15, 06:06 PM
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A neighbor of mine once referred to my down tube shifters as "reach-down switchers." I loved that.
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Old 04-16-15, 06:11 PM
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If an expression is not a misnomer, is it a nomer?
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Old 04-16-15, 06:19 PM
  #36  
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Jawn, or Jimmy Jawn more specifically.
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Old 04-16-15, 06:32 PM
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Back in the last days of Winning magazine, one of the articles on the back page mentioned some kid coming into a shop asking for a "27 dot 2" seat post. This was as Internet speak was coming into society.

I'm glad that the dot thing didn't catch on with bike parts.
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Old 04-16-15, 06:33 PM
  #38  
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I've always been told that an axle is shaft that rotates and transmits torque, although there is also fixed axles that items rotate around, but generally moving object related. Spindles on the other hand, are normally a shaft fixed on one end that something rotates around such as a sheave or wheel.
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Old 04-16-15, 11:44 PM
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I once had a bicycle called a Ross SUPER Grand Tour Professional.

The only one of those terms that was truly accurate in this case was "Ross."
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Old 04-17-15, 12:40 AM
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Is it a skewer or a quick release hub?
Is it a stem or a gooseneck?
Is it a index shifter or a ratchet action?
Is it a cog or a gear?
Is it cadence or RPM?
Is it carbon fiber or unobtainium?
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Old 04-17-15, 03:43 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
And the Australian word for trouser clips: boyangs.
It's 5:30am and I'm cracking up reading this. Like so many Ausssie words it's fun to say it.

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Old 04-17-15, 04:11 AM
  #42  
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10-speed, 12-speed, 8-speed, 9-speed, 12-speed?

Given that speed is continuous there are an infinite number of possible speeds. But are my 2x6 gear setups 12-speeds or merely 6? 12 sounds better!

12-ratio would be more meaningful. Or 6-cog. Or 2x6.
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Old 04-17-15, 05:51 AM
  #43  
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Thinking about cable stops (again) it bothers me that we use the same term to distinguish a bolt that anchors the inner cable end and the thing, often bolted or brazed to the frame, that anchors the outer cable (cable housing). In certain circumstances we call the latter a "cable hanger," but that, too, lacks specificity. With this in mind, it would not be bad to use "fulcrum" for all of the latter, whether on the chain stay, a bridge across the seat stays, or even on one arm of a side pull brake.
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Old 04-17-15, 06:03 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
10-speed, 12-speed, 8-speed, 9-speed, 12-speed?

Given that speed is continuous there are an infinite number of possible speeds. But are my 2x6 gear setups 12-speeds or merely 6? 12 sounds better!

12-ratio would be more meaningful. Or 6-cog. Or 2x6.
And let's not forget those ratios that are so close as to be effectively the same. Your 12-ratio drive system may be something more like an 8- or 9-ratio system. That's one issue you'll not encounter with a pure IGH setup.
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Old 04-17-15, 06:47 AM
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You had me at misnomenclature.

I think speeds is a stupid name for gears, even worse in Dutch: "versnellingen" (or speeder-uppers). this gives the false illusion that bikes with gears are inherently faster, which is totally dependent on conditions and not on gearing.

And god save us from tire sizing nomenclature.

Perfect thread for language pedants like me.

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Old 04-17-15, 07:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Rcrxjlb View Post
snip...Is it carbon fiber or unobtainium?
From my motorcycle lifetime, I always has this one associated with titanium, especially after getting several grams of said "alloy" in my spine.

Also, Why do we park in driveways, and drive on parkways?

Tom, you need to spend some time on a UK BB, or even go to England, "English" is not what usually gets spoken there, or here in the US.

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Old 04-17-15, 07:13 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
...And there is also the related "first position" freewheel cog, which traditionally is the smallest cog if you read up on freewheel building, but witch may not be intuitive or in agreement with the usual meaning of "first gear"....
When it comes to servicing old freewheels, sometimes a bit of magic, incantations, and special potions are very much needed!

I've pondered this as well and have come to the conclusion that in the case of cogs on a freewheel or cassette, it does make sense to work from the outside towards the inside. Also, in most cases, the part which can be removed first is the smallest cog (which is not the case for old Regina and Atom freewheels where the largest cog can also be thread off from the inside).
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Old 04-17-15, 09:22 AM
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My Steyr's "10-speed" drivetrain actually features seven evenly-spaced, sequential ratios if one back-shift is thrown in to break up the larger shift at the chainrings.

It's either that, or it's a six-speed without the back-shift of the right lever.

Seven-speed drivetrain:

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Old 04-17-15, 09:46 AM
  #49  
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Single Speed...try as I might, I can't maintain 50 kph ALL of the time. On my single gear bike even.
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Old 04-17-15, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Rcrxjlb View Post
Is it a skewer or a quick release hub?
Is it a stem or a gooseneck?
Is it a index shifter or a ratchet action?
Is it a cog or a gear?
Is it cadence or RPM?
Is it carbon fiber or unobtainium?
I would say:

Is it a skewer or a quick release hub? The skewer is what makes a quick release hub release quickly.
Is it a stem or a gooseneck? Yo, it's a gooseneck, bro.
Is it a index shifter or a ratchet action? Depends. SunTour made both types if discussing barcons.
Is it a cog or a gear? Once again, depends. A freewheel cog would be one end of the chainring/cog combo that produces a gear ratio or "gear."
Is it cadence or RPM? Interchangeable, in my opinion.
Is it carbon fiber or unobtainium? On my budget they're the same thing, although I've always considered unobtainium to be metallic.

Last edited by thumpism; 04-17-15 at 11:07 AM.
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