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Bicycle misnomenclature

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Old 05-01-17, 06:19 AM
  #126  
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All my bikes have the same motorway, so regardless of the colorway, they go about the same speedway.
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Old 05-01-17, 06:21 AM
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Way to go.....!!!!!!
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Old 05-01-17, 06:30 AM
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Yup. There's always a way.
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Old 05-01-17, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
I'm pretty sure the history of that term is as follows:

1. Hipsters used it to justify the high prices they were asking for their "curated" fixies.
2. BikeSnobNYC adopted it as a way of poking fun at hipsters.
3. BSNYC's fan's adopted it because it's fun to play along with his jokes.
4. It accidentally ended up becoming a common term.

In other words, it's all fun and games until somebody loses an eye.
Sounds like a corollary of Poe's Law, "it is impossible to create a parody of extreme views so obviously exaggerated that it cannot be mistaken by some readers or viewers as a sincere expression of the parodied views".

Adding to the list, my GF refers to a local bicycle event, Pelotonia, as "Peddletonia". At first, I think she misheard the name; now I suspect she uses it to watch me sputter.
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Old 05-01-17, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by rhm View Post
I grant you that the mere existence of this thing, the thing that you don't want to call a colorway, is annoying. But the fact is: it exists. Here we have the annoying fact of an annoying word for an annoying phenomenon. But is it an example of misnomenclature? Unless you're going to tell me the correct word for it, I think not.

I concede your point, and claim instead that it is an example of malnomenclature. We have an awkward English word, borrowed from the fashion world. A country with 246 different cheeses must have a better word we can steal! If not, a country with thousands of types and shapes for pasta surely must!

and don't even get me started on "Advancement".
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Old 05-01-17, 05:39 PM
  #131  
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[QUOTE=noglider;17725573 Bottom bracket is one that does irritate me, and it's my fault more than anyone's. Newcomers to cycling might find it confusing to hear us speaking of a bracket that isn't a bracket at all.[/QUOTE]



When we talk about bottom brackets in the Bike Kitchen place (in Britain), we were talking about the lugged bit in the frame where the bearings would screw in - at least, that's what I was talking about. I think the others there were saying the same thing?
To me, the bearings and the bottom bracket are two separate entities. That's what I was getting at...
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Old 05-01-17, 05:50 PM
  #132  
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Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
From my motorcycle lifetime, I always has this one associated with titanium, especially after getting several grams of said "alloy" in my spine.

Also, Why do we park in driveways, and drive on parkways?

Tom, you need to spend some time on a UK BB, or even go to England, "English" is not what usually gets spoken there, or here in the US.

Bill

A lot of 'US English' is starting to creep into the language over here. It's mainly among younger people, but some friends of a similar age to me will drop the odd American word into the conversation.
And the writing!!! The stuff I see on F***book seems to be written in code. It may have started as English, but...

Grrr.! I'm gradually becoming a grumpy old codger in my middle age.
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Old 05-01-17, 06:14 PM
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I hope to some day become fluent in English, either UK or American would be fine. I mainly speak a combination USMC and Construction site patois, especially since I worked exclusively on military bases in my engineering career that is winding down. And, I do not do FB, no way, no how. I lasted about 2 months and had it with the political crap and the gossip.

My time on some of the UK bike forums has been actually very enjoyable, no harsh treatment so far. Cheers sir.

Bill
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Old 05-01-17, 06:46 PM
  #134  
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Since an axle rotates, and a spindle is fixed, technically, a bicycle only has one axle (unless a tandum or more); which is commonly known as the "bottom bracket spindle".
Your hubs and pedals rotate on a "spindle" not an "axle".
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Old 05-01-17, 06:55 PM
  #135  
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There's probably a very reasonable explanation, but I'm too lazy to Google now, after imbibing many delicious and nutritious IPA's..... but why are the frame stays called "stays"?
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Old 05-01-17, 08:12 PM
  #136  
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Originally Posted by bicyclridr4life View Post
Since an axle rotates, and a spindle is fixed, technically, a bicycle only has one axle (unless a tandum or more); which is commonly known as the "bottom bracket spindle".
Your hubs and pedals rotate on a "spindle" not an "axle".
But while pedal rotates around its spindle, and the spindle revolves around the bottom bracket, it's fair to call the pedal spindle a spindle.
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Old 05-01-17, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Fidbloke View Post
When we talk about bottom brackets in the Bike Kitchen place (in Britain), we were talking about the lugged bit in the frame where the bearings would screw in - at least, that's what I was talking about. I think the others there were saying the same thing?
To me, the bearings and the bottom bracket are two separate entities. That's what I was getting at...
That's what I'm saying. The old UK interpretation makes more sense than the current one which the UK and US share. TAke a look at online catalogs. You can buy a crankset (US) or chainset (UK) with or without the so-called bottom bracket, and the vendors are referring to the bearing sets, not a frame lug.
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Old 05-01-17, 08:15 PM
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By the way, now I'm hearing in my head the various accents you might have if you were to read your own words out loud. Needless to say, I have an accent peculiar to my region.
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Old 05-01-17, 11:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post

I'm tired of people calling burnsides sideburns. Get it right folks.


I think that's a US/British thing.

We call them sideburns over here.
Wasn't Burnside a TV detective?
I think he was a character in 'The Bill'.
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Old 05-02-17, 05:46 AM
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For a glimpse of some older terminology, here's the spec's of a Drysdale bike sold in 1954:

Note the 24T front sprocket; old Mr. Drysdale was a track bike guy, and he thought in terms of inch pitch cranks.
The bike came with a Williams crank set and a Bayliss Wiley bracket set.
Note also the "Vanzone rims alloy" and "sprinter tires" both marked as "27 x 1 1/4". He means Vianzone rims; and I'm pretty sure 'sprinter' means tubular tires, not 27" clinchers.
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Old 05-02-17, 06:11 AM
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@rhm , yes, as I understand it, a sprinter is a tubular, or as we called them as kids, sew-ups. That sounds like someone's dream bike, back in that period. I imagine it would be a rare one here in the states.

I noticed the 24T front ring, took me a few re reads to pick up on the 1"pitch track slant to it. That is one neat sales receipt, do you actually have it, or is that a scan. Hold on to it if its yours.

Bill
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Old 05-02-17, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
@rhm , yes, as I understand it, a sprinter is a tubular, or as we called them as kids, sew-ups. That sounds like someone's dream bike, back in that period. I imagine it would be a rare one here in the states.

I noticed the 24T front ring, took me a few re reads to pick up on the 1"pitch track slant to it. That is one neat sales receipt, do you actually have it, or is that a scan. Hold on to it if its yours.

Bill
Bill, I did have the receipt, it came with the bike! Alas the bike had been 'upgraded' in the 70's and not a single original component remained. Even the Simplex derailleur hanger had been cut off. Fortunately with the guidance of the receipt I was able to put the bike back in something like original configuration (forget about the Viazone rims and Pelissier hubs, though! I put 27" Weinmann clinchers on it, with Atom hubs). It was a great bike, but I didn't ride it enough. I sold it, along with the receipt.
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Old 05-02-17, 06:30 AM
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Oh man, well that is a nice piece of history. I'd love to have see it as new. Thanks for sharing the receipt with us though!
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Old 05-02-17, 07:04 AM
  #144  
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Originally Posted by rhm View Post
Bill, I did have the receipt, it came with the bike! Alas the bike had been 'upgraded' in the 70's and not a single original component remained. Even the Simplex derailleur hanger had been cut off. Fortunately with the guidance of the receipt I was able to put the bike back in something like original configuration (forget about the Viazone rims and Pelissier hubs, though! I put 27" Weinmann clinchers on it, with Atom hubs). It was a great bike, but I didn't ride it enough. I sold it, along with the receipt.
Ouch, seeing that drewing had to hurt.

I'm not clear. What is a 1" pitch crank?
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Old 05-02-17, 07:14 AM
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Here's a photo of the Drysdale as restored.


Back on topic, what is 1" pitch, what is skiptooth? I'm not sure what's the difference or which is which. So with luck someone more knowledgeable will step in and straighten me out. But "skiptooth" is what they call the chain and chainring on old cruisers and balloon tire bikes, while "inch pitch" was the old track standard. I'm not clear on whether they are different words for the same thing, or different things. Anyway, compared to the usual half inch pitch chain, the inch pitch chainring has bigger and stronger teeth, just fewer of them. Here's a 24T Williams track bike chainring on ebay now:


And here's a Schwinn skiptooth ring:
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Old 05-02-17, 08:46 AM
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What gets me: lately, a lot of people have started referring to any single-speed (yeah, yeah) bike as a fixed-gear or fixie.

W/r/t "peddle" vs. "pedal": for a while a guy in my city (Greenville, NC, home of the East Carolina University "Pirates") was operating a pedicab company called "Peddlin' Pirates." I was always annoyed by that, but then it occurred to me that they may very well have been "peddlin'" on the side, if you know what I mean.

Still, it's bad when the local news media picks up on the mistake and runs with it: Peddlin' Pirates Not Peddling
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Old 05-02-17, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Dirt Farmer View Post
There's probably a very reasonable explanation, but I'm too lazy to Google now, after imbibing many delicious and nutritious IPA's..... but why are the frame stays called "stays"?
I couldn't find anything definitive, but wouldn't it be funny if the term was adopted from corsets?

Sheldon's glossary has stay as a "A thin, usually straight, structural member: Seatstay, chainstay, fender stay, mixte stay."

A stay (noun) is defined as
  1. one that serves as a prop : support
  2. a thin firm strip (as of plastic) used for stiffening a garment or part (such as a shirt collar)
  3. a corset stiffened with bones —usually used in plural

Apparently, this usage came from the same etiology as STAKE:
Middle English, from Middle French estaie, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle Dutch stake meaning pole, Middle Low German stak meaning post, stake meaning pole
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Old 05-02-17, 11:08 AM
  #148  
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Fun thread. Bottom bracket used to particularly annoy me because I worked in a machine shop at one time and "bracket" conveys something very different than what "bottom bracket" is used to mean.

But every hobby/industry/occupation has it jargon. Cycling jargon amuses me but generally doesn't annoy me.

Military jargon, on the other hand, annoys me, because I had to put up with it for many years and once I got my discharge I was finally free to comment on how pointless and silly it is. "It's a weapon, not a gun!" It's both, actually.

Actually, what annoys me is not the jargon itself, but the way people in those particular fields seize upon any perceived incorrect use of vocabulary to assert their superiority and denigrate the person who is not using the words "correctly." (See also: prison guard vs. correctional officer.)
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Old 05-02-17, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Fidbloke View Post
A lot of 'US English' is starting to creep into the language over here. It's mainly among younger people, but some friends of a similar age to me will drop the odd American word into the conversation.
If it makes you feel any better, the converse is happening too. Some Brit terms are creeping into US English as well. I was out camping last year with some millennials. It was colder than I expected and I remarked that I should have brought a watch cap. None of them new what I was talking about. Eventually they said, "Oh, you mean a beanie." Beanie??? It's a Brit term that's taken over in the last ~10 years (?). In the past a beanie meant essentially a baseball cap with no visor. We said watch cap or knit cap, or maybe ski hat.


Originally Posted by Fidbloke View Post
I think that's a US/British thing.

We call them sideburns over here.
Wasn't Burnside a TV detective?
I think he was a character in 'The Bill'.
Actually they call them sideburns here too. I was being a smartass. Sideburns is a corruption of Burnsides as in Ambrose Burnside, a union general in the US civil war. Before Gen. Burnside and his famous whiskers, they were simply called side whiskers. Not much zing in that name.

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Old 05-02-17, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
If it makes you feel any better, the converse is happening too. Some Brit terms are creeping into US English as well.
Indeed. Though the general unfamiliarity with written discourse is what's more depressing, in freshman composition these days I see "whilst" used quite often. "Spot on" and "go missing" seem to have migrated here, too.
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