Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-12-18, 12:39 PM   #176
palincss
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 180
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fett2oo5 View Post
I mean no disrespect, but I'm 34 and have never heard the term watch cap. As far as I've known (again, only 34 years) they've always been called beanies.
Try a google image search for "watch cap" and see what comes up.
palincss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-18, 12:46 PM   #177
altenwrencher
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Bicycle malingo: "cluster" to mean the group of cogs driven by the chain. The term makes sense, but we in the know were sure to always call it a freewheel. Or now more likely a cassette.

Cassette (historically, a small case or box) is not so different from the meaning of cluster - a group of the same or similar elements gathered or occurring closely together.

Freewheel describes the action of the underlying mechanism - without saying anything about the observable group of cogs. No wonder many customers and some mechanics called it a cluster!

Last edited by altenwrencher; 01-12-18 at 04:19 PM.
altenwrencher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-18, 01:07 PM   #178
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
Thread Starter
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Bikes: too many
Posts: 31,941
Mentioned: 235 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2699 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by palincss View Post
But during the bike boom the big export market for Japan was the United States, which used English measurements. And honestly, aren't you glad they went that way? We're far better off today than we would have been had they gone with French standards, in my opinion.
I don't know. Why are English measurements better? I like metric. The only problem with the French standard is that it wasn't adopted long-term, so it varies from the rest of the world. They learned soon enough it was too late to change pitch on chains and diameters of bearing balls.
__________________
Tom Reingold, [email protected]
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-18, 03:18 PM   #179
jetboy 
Senior Member
 
jetboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Oakland, CA
Bikes: holdsworth mistral, centurion ironman, look hinault 753, Zunow z-1, centurion semi-pro, look kg96
Posts: 2,320
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
I run into the use of "ferrule" for the cable housing end caps, but not for the ends of the cables themselves- which is often called an "end cap" or "end crimp" . but its obviously a ferrule by most common definitions, while the other is ..still a possible ferrule but also could be a cap.

usually a ferrule is crimped on and not easily replaceable without cutting etc, where a cap can be taken on and off. its backwards really from the common sense of it.
jetboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-18, 07:18 PM   #180
thumpism
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Bridgestone RB-T, Trek 510 city build, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 L23 and L19, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Raleigh DL-1
Posts: 2,951
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 679 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by altenwrencher View Post
Cassette (historically, a small case or box) is not so different from the meaning of cluster - a group of the same or similar elements gathered or occurring closely together.
...and usually easily removable as a unit, as in the case of a cassette motorcycle transmission with removable gearsets; good old fashioned cassette tapes; cassette clusters.
thumpism is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-18, 07:47 PM   #181
agmetal
Senior Member
 
agmetal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Boston, MA
Bikes: Bianchi Volpe, ANT 3-speed roadster, New Albion Privateer singlespeed, Raleigh One Way singlespeed, Raleigh Professional "retro roadie" rebuild, 198? Fuji(?) franken-5-speed, 1937 Raleigh Tourist, 1952 Raleigh Sports, 1966 Raleigh Sports step-through
Posts: 1,280
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by altenwrencher View Post
Bicycle malingo: "cluster" to mean the group of cogs driven by the chain. The term makes sense, but we in the know were sure to always call it a freewheel. Or now more likely a cassette.

Cassette (historically, a small case or box) is not so different from the meaning of cluster - a group of the same or similar elements gathered or occurring closely together.

Freewheel describes the action of the underlying mechanism - without saying anything about the observable group of cogs. No wonder many customers and some mechanics called it a cluster!
I use "cluster" all the time when I don't know offhand whether the bike I'm talking about has a cassette or freewheel...so I'm one of those mechanics you refer to!
agmetal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-18, 09:27 PM   #182
Trsnrtr
(Tresenriter)
 
Trsnrtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Central Illinois
Bikes: Giant Propel, Gianni Motta, Co-Motion Supremo, ICE VTX, Bacchetta CA2.0
Posts: 13,197
Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4133 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti View Post
Stopped for gas & a refreshmet in a filling station in Texas and asked if they had pop for sale. The reply was, Pop? WTF is pop? Some kind of drug?
My wife was in a drug store in Florida and asked the young checkout lady if she could put her purchases in a sack. The young girl had no idea what a sack was. After telling her it was a bag, the girl was astonished and said she had never heard of a grocery or paper or plastic sack. Btw, we're from Illinois and use both sack and bag interchangeably.
__________________
Dennis T

The road is long
With many a winding turn
That leads us to who knows where
Trsnrtr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-18, 10:18 PM   #183
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Bikes: '73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, '72 Peugeot UO-8, '82 Peugeot TH8, '87 Bianchi Brava, '76? Masi Grand Criterium, '87 Centurion Ironman Expert, '74 Motobecane Champion Team, '86 Gazelle champion mondial, '81? Grandis, '82? Tommasini, '83 Peugeot PFN10
Posts: 12,056
Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 625 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by altenwrencher View Post
Bicycle malingo: "cluster" to mean the group of cogs driven by the chain.
Cogs?? We often use cog to mean an individual sprocket but it really means one tooth on the sprocket. I was once berated by a fellow C&V'er who is a mechanical engineer for that misuse. But I still fall into that trap every so often.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-18, 07:27 AM   #184
thumpism
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Bridgestone RB-T, Trek 510 city build, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 L23 and L19, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Raleigh DL-1
Posts: 2,951
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 679 Post(s)
You know that swingarm on your full suspension bike? It's actually a swinging fork. For an example of a swingarm (mysteriously and redundantly called a "single-sided swingarm") look no further than the Honda VFR800 motorcycles.
thumpism is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-18, 07:36 AM   #185
thumpism
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Bridgestone RB-T, Trek 510 city build, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 L23 and L19, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Raleigh DL-1
Posts: 2,951
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 679 Post(s)
Along those same lines, what is the pivoting device on the front of this bicycle? It sure ain't a fork.
thumpism is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-18, 08:03 AM   #186
Pompiere
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NW Ohio
Bikes: 1984 Miyata 310, 1989 Club Fuji, 1986 Schwinn Sierra, 2011 Jamis Quest, 1980 Peugeot TH8 Tandem, 1992 Performance Parabola, 1987 Ross Mt. Hood, 1988 Schwinn LeTour
Posts: 2,125
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
I had seen photos of those bikes from the side before, but never one from the front. It just looks weird, in a "how does that thing even work?" kind of way. I'm sure they ride fine, but in my mind, it looks like it is unbalanced and the steering would always be pulling to one side.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
Along those same lines, what is the pivoting device on the front of this bicycle? It sure ain't a fork.
Pompiere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-18, 08:09 AM   #187
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Bikes: '73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, '72 Peugeot UO-8, '82 Peugeot TH8, '87 Bianchi Brava, '76? Masi Grand Criterium, '87 Centurion Ironman Expert, '74 Motobecane Champion Team, '86 Gazelle champion mondial, '81? Grandis, '82? Tommasini, '83 Peugeot PFN10
Posts: 12,056
Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 625 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompiere View Post
I'm sure they ride fine, but in my mind, it looks like it is unbalanced and the steering would always be pulling to one side.
As long as the wheel is in line with the steering axis it shouldn't pull to one side. It would certainly make the front end lighter than having two struts. But that arrangement does put a bending stress on the single strut. I would think that adds friction to the suspension, and also makes it wear out faster.

But yeah, it does look weird. Or wierd, or wired or something. Just not right.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-18, 08:35 AM   #188
qcpmsame 
Quality Engineering
 
qcpmsame's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Barrineau Park, FL
Bikes: Several, three if you must know.
Posts: 11,962
Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 829 Post(s)
I talked with the owners at our LBS about the Lefty Cannondale forks, last week. We were chatting about the Slate grave bike, I just feel like its strange looking is all. One of the owners said he has the same MTB model pictured above, and they perform great. Lots of them out there on MTBs and some others, but not for me. BMW motorcycles like the single sided rear suspension for their shaft drive units, biggest plus for those type of rear arms is faster racing tire changes, I would think.

Bill
__________________
USMC 1975-1977 Semper Fi
I Can Do All Things Through Him Whom Strengthens Me, Philippians 4:13


qcpmsame is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-18, 08:50 AM   #189
n0+4c|u3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Bikes: 1990 Specialized RockHopper, 1996 Specialized HardRock, 1965 Schwinn Typhoon, 1968 Peugeot 10 speed, 1954 Schwinn Wasp, Late 90's Huffy Manbrook (Cranbrook), 1989 Bianchi Super Grizzly
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
BMW motorcycles like the single sided rear suspension for their shaft drive units, biggest plus for those type of rear arms is faster racing tire changes, I would think.
Watching them change tires on MotoGP bikes gives you some perspective on that.
Ducati runs single sided swingarms, so does Aprilia. Watching their pit stops vs Honda and Yamaha's makes me think that maybe the two sided swingarm has, at this time, a superior design in regards to mounting and unmounting in a speedy fashion.
n0+4c|u3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-18, 09:12 AM   #190
MaxKatt
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
I ride my road bike, mountain bike, and gravel bike on roads, mountains, and gravel respectively.

I've yet to ride my Fat Bike on fat.

Plus, the bike's not really fat, but rather the round rubbers.
MaxKatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-18, 12:57 PM   #191
altenwrencher
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
[QUOTE=altenwrencher;20107937]Along those same lines, what is the pivoting device on the front of this bicycle? It sure ain't a fork.

It's a spork.
altenwrencher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 03:22 PM   #192
old's'cool 
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here
Posts: 4,095
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
As long as the wheel is in line with the steering axis it shouldn't pull to one side. It would certainly make the front end lighter than having two struts. But that arrangement does put a bending stress on the single strut. I would think that adds friction to the suspension, and also makes it wear out faster...
For the same strength, buckling resistance, and price point, I doubt it would be lighter.
__________________
Geoff
"There is no Fail without Try" - Yoda Simpson
old's'cool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 05:26 PM   #193
obrentharris 
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Bikes: fewer (n-1)
Posts: 1,829
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Cogset, freewheel, cluster; it's all good to me.

To expect the kind of precision from language that allows no ambiguity will always lead to disappointment. Every language that I know of (with, perhaps, the exception of the computer languages about which I know nothing) has multiple words that mean very similar things, has words that mean multiple things, and has words that mean one thing to some speakers and something else to others. Additionally languages that are in current usage are a moving target: They are constantly changing.

So much depends on context... and this is a good thing if you have any poetic inclination.

Myself, I like the fact that I can drop into my small sprocket to sprint for a city limit sign but I can also drop into my low gear for a long climb. I can drop another rider and I can drop behind the group.

The Mountain bike club to which I have belonged for over 25 years is called the Forest Knolls Freewheelers yet none of us have freewheels on our bikes anymore. That makes the name more, not less, interesting in my mind.
Brent
obrentharris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 08:58 PM   #194
elcraft
elcraft
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Greater Boston
Bikes:
Posts: 533
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by n0+4c|u3 View Post
Watching them change tires on MotoGP bikes gives you some perspective on that.
Ducati runs single sided swingarms, so does Aprilia. Watching their pit stops vs Honda and Yamaha's makes me think that maybe the two sided swingarm has, at this time, a superior design in regards to mounting and unmounting in a speedy fashion.
The famed Vespa (at least up to the P Series) had single sided front an rear wheel suspension. The combo engine casing/ gear box was in fact the rear swing arm with a single shock on the left side as was the front fork. The rims were off set to one side and were interchangeable between the front and rear. This made it easy to replace a flat tire with an onboard spare. Actually, the Vespa was some very clever engineering and design.
elcraft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 09:12 PM   #195
elcraft
elcraft
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Greater Boston
Bikes:
Posts: 533
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fidbloke View Post
I thought that 'Yooze' was a Scottish thing, but I've heard people saying it in films that have a New York context as well.
"I dinna ken yooze"
elcraft is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 10:35 PM   #196
n0+4c|u3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Bikes: 1990 Specialized RockHopper, 1996 Specialized HardRock, 1965 Schwinn Typhoon, 1968 Peugeot 10 speed, 1954 Schwinn Wasp, Late 90's Huffy Manbrook (Cranbrook), 1989 Bianchi Super Grizzly
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by obrentharris View Post
The Mountain bike club to which I have belonged for over 25 years is called the Forest Knolls Freewheelers yet none of us have freewheels on our bikes anymore. That makes the name more, not less, interesting in my mind.
Brent
Interesting, I was wondering what freewheeling had to do with freewheels when I read that
As the common definition for "freewheeling" is "characterized by a disregard for rules or conventions; unconstrained or uninhibited."
n0+4c|u3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 10:46 PM   #197
obrentharris 
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Bikes: fewer (n-1)
Posts: 1,829
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by n0+4c|u3 View Post
Interesting, I was wondering what freewheeling had to do with freewheels when I read that
As the common definition for "freewheeling" is "characterized by a disregard for rules or conventions; unconstrained or uninhibited."
Aren't plays on words fun? Part of the reason why I cherish ambiguity in language.
Brent
obrentharris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 10:58 PM   #198
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder
Posts: 4,848
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 825 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
Maybe you guys can clear this up for me, with your historical perspective.

We have saddle and "seat post". Why isn't it "saddle post" and "saddle tube"? Same goes for "seat stay".

The pipe holding the saddle is "post", but the one on the fork is steerer "tube". Doesn't "steerer post" make more sense? For what reason "head tube"? Seems like steerer tube or "fork tube" since it's the tube that the fork post goes into.

Derailleur, or even Sheldon Brown's "de-railler" makes no sense. There is no rail, but there are cogs.
So why not just call those things we sit on seats? (Many of do. And get corrected for it here.)

I have no problem with derailleurs. They push the chain off the cog it is on and over to the next one, or they "derail" the chain, very similar to derailling a train.

Ben
79pmooney is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 11:08 PM   #199
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder
Posts: 4,848
Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 825 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by altenwrencher
Bicycle malingo: "cluster" to mean the group of cogs driven by the chain. The term makes sense, but we in the know were sure to always call it a freewheel. Or now more likely a cassette.

Cassette (historically, a small case or box) is not so different from the meaning of cluster - a group of the same or similar elements gathered or occurring closely together.

Freewheel describes the action of the underlying mechanism - without saying anything about the observable group of cogs. No wonder many customers and some mechanics called it a cluster!





Quote:
Originally Posted by agmetal View Post
I use "cluster" all the time when I don't know offhand whether the bike I'm talking about has a cassette or freewheel...so I'm one of those mechanics you refer to!
I hang my track cogs for my fix gear on bailing wire which I twist together at the top to travel. 12t sprocket thru 23t sprocket less whatever is on the bike. I call (I believe quite properly) that collection of sprockets a "cluster". Probably the only 12-speed fix gear cluster out there.

Ben
79pmooney is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-18, 11:35 PM   #200
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Bikes:
Posts: 1,617
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 651 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
But that arrangement does put a bending stress on the single strut. I would think that adds friction to the suspension, and also makes it wear out faster.
The thing about suspension forks is that even two-sided ones are generally internally asymmetric. i.e. the damper is on just one side.

Lefty forks actually have very low static friction: rather than use the upper and lower part of the leg as a circular bushing, they internally use a square-shaped connection on roller bearings. The square shape of the bearing connection is also why the fork doesn't twist, despite having only one leg.
HTupolev is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:19 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION