Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Share your photography tips

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Share your photography tips

Old 04-27-15, 09:48 PM
  #26  
jiangshi
OFG in Exile
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,809
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 448 Post(s)
Liked 162 Times in 112 Posts
A little love for the great Ray Dobbins:
MY PHOTO SETUP
jiangshi is offline  
Old 04-27-15, 10:33 PM
  #27  
pcb 
Senior Member
 
pcb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Joisey
Posts: 1,453
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 360 Post(s)
Liked 549 Times in 257 Posts
Lots of good points so far. Just like an understanding of bicycle basics (gears, brakes, tire pressure, rider position) contributes to better riding, an understanding of camera/photography basics (shutter speed, aperture, ISO, lens focal length, depth of field, lighting & exposure, composition) contributes to better photos. Some folks definitely "have an eye," and get great images without much conscious effort, but most of us do better with some learning and practice. It's definitely less about the hardware, and more about knowing how to get the most/best out of it. But sometimes the hardware does matter.

As with people, bikes usually look better shot from further away, zoomed in (telephoto) than up close, zoomed out (wideangle). Close/wide, especially looking down, distorts perspective and ovalizes wheels. Everything looks kinda scrunched and wonky, though this may not consciously register. Far/tele compresses perspective nicely and keeps round things round:


Neutral backgrounds are usually better than garage doors:


Placing busy backgrounds far away is usually better than sticking them right behind the bicycle.


But if the background is close, using a wide aperture to soften the background helps:


These are all what I'd characterize as beauty/catalog/establishing-type shots. Mostly filling the frame with metal, not much in the way of dynamic composition. I think there's a considerable difference between good product photography and making compelling images that happen to have bicycles in them. I do OK when it's about the bike. I'm far less successful when it's all about the image...
__________________
Fuggedaboutit!
pcb is offline  
Old 04-27-15, 11:15 PM
  #28  
poprad
Senior Member
 
poprad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: In transit
Posts: 1,611

Bikes: 07 Vanilla, 98 IRD road frame built up with 25th Ann DA, Surly cross check with 105 comp, 78 Raleigh Comp GS, 85 Centurionelli

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by jiangshi View Post
A little love for the great Ray Dobbins:
MY PHOTO SETUP
Yep. Ray's the master of modest equipment meets careful preparation thus turning out world-class pics. My best work doesn't come close to his.

My one tip is that macro (close ups) of interest areas really make a bike look good. I particularly like the fork crown, seat cluster, and bb areas:

[IMG]Vanilla 26 by mtypinski, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]Centurionelli 108 by mtypinski, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]Vanilla 2 by mtypinski, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]P1010680 by mtypinski, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]Centurionelli 098 by mtypinski, on Flickr[/IMG]
poprad is offline  
Old 04-27-15, 11:40 PM
  #29  
JetWave
Senior Member
 
JetWave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 359
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I am always at a loss trying to figure out how to take sharp details pictures. I have used a tripod, brighter lighting, fastest shutter speed, but never be able to get super sharp images. Your pictures here ( especially the Campy brake picture)are excellent examples of sharpness and details that I always wish I can get. Would appreciate if you can share some tips. Thanks.
JetWave is offline  
Old 04-27-15, 11:51 PM
  #30  
poprad
Senior Member
 
poprad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: In transit
Posts: 1,611

Bikes: 07 Vanilla, 98 IRD road frame built up with 25th Ann DA, Surly cross check with 105 comp, 78 Raleigh Comp GS, 85 Centurionelli

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Thanks for that, my best success with the macro shots is actually with digital compacts. I brace my hand on something like part of the frame, and set the camera to the macro mode (usually a flower icon). Sometimes I'll have to use manual focus mode to get it to lock onto where I want the focus to be. Starting out, using a tripod and good lighting as you mention doing takes many errors out of the process. If you're doing that you just need to ensure the camera knows you're taking a closeup. Most compact digitals are actually quite good at close focus shots, but you have to be the right distance lens-to-subject that your camera "reads." Your manual should tell you what the rarge is (like 4 to 8 cm) for using macro mode. Once you figure that out your closeups should be pin-sharp.

also note, most cameras let you option either multi point or center single-point focus. Many compacts even have a "select focus point" function that lets you move the focus square around the filed of view so you don't have to have your focus point in the middle of the frame.

What are you shooting with?

I like unique juxtapositions too. I had a headbadge made to match the label of my favorite Belgian ale:

[IMG]Jen Green custom headbadge by mtypinski, on Flickr[/IMG]

Last edited by poprad; 04-28-15 at 12:08 AM.
poprad is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 03:09 AM
  #31  
bwilli88 
Senior Member
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kampong Cham, Cambodia but I have quite a few in Lancaster, PA
Posts: 2,708

Bikes: Bikes in USA; 73 Raleigh Supercourse dingle speed, 74 Raleigh Grand Prix SS, 78 Raleigh Supercourse, 83 Centurion Pro-Tour, 82 Raleigh RRA.

Mentioned: 60 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 697 Post(s)
Liked 418 Times in 253 Posts
First hold the camera steady, tripods help, mantra - Stop, Steady, Shoot.
Focus
Before you shoot Frame the image, Look UDAA (Up, Down, All Around). look for things that stick out around the subject.
Focus
Make sure that the lens is clean and dust free.
Focus
Did I mention Focus
Golden hour for red or blue objects and the Blue hour for yellow or Green
foCus

Bikes like children are short, get down to their level, Squat


and last but not least clean you own glasses so you can focus.




Brian

Last edited by bwilli88; 04-28-15 at 07:34 AM.
bwilli88 is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 04:28 AM
  #32  
sloar 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Elwood Indiana
Posts: 6,856

Bikes: they change so much I'm tired of updating this

Mentioned: 151 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 990 Post(s)
Liked 473 Times in 211 Posts
Great tips here, I'm with Robbietunes on this, I take horrible pics. My pics are usually crisp and clear, I just get horrible angles and shot placements. I never know where to shoot, and for some reason my bike shots always make the handlebars look distorted and huge looking. I do admire,"envy" great photography though, and it always makes it more enjoyable to see quality bike photos on this forum than the garage door shots.
__________________
Semper fi
sloar is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 07:04 AM
  #33  
rootboy 
Senior Member
 
rootboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wherever
Posts: 16,756
Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 117 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by leegf View Post
The tools have changed - i.e., the digital darkroom (Photoshop) has replaced the analog darkroom, pixels have replaced emulsion - but the techniques that @franswa mentions - dodging, burning - have existed for almost as long as photography itself.

That said, I, too, agree that I actually prefer the original to the retouched file, which to my eye looks hypersaturated. Of course, a lot of that comes down to personal preference


You said it, Leegf. It's all personal preference. I've always been a "straight photography" buff. But even the greats, ie; Cartier-Bresson, W. E. Smith, et al, dodged and burned and manipulated in the dark room. To some extent. I really don't mind a little manipulation in digital photos, as long as it is not over-done.

On cameras, I have a Canon DSLR on which I sometimes use a very sharp, and old, Nikon manual lens for close ups. But I've found it's hard to beat my little Canon PowerShot S110. Amazing little camera, with a very good lens on it.
rootboy is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 07:07 AM
  #34  
rootboy 
Senior Member
 
rootboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wherever
Posts: 16,756
Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 117 Times in 69 Posts
"Bikes like children are short, get down to their level, Squat"

Important tip, Bill. One sees so many bike pics shot from a standing position. Placing the lens horizontally in line with the frame helps so much.
rootboy is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 07:09 AM
  #35  
rootboy 
Senior Member
 
rootboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wherever
Posts: 16,756
Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 117 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by poprad View Post
[IMG]Centurionelli 098 by mtypinski, on Flickr[/IMG]
Superb, Poprad. Or should I say… SUPER!
rootboy is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 07:51 AM
  #36  
franswa
Senior Member
 
franswa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: ATX
Posts: 1,751
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 309 Post(s)
Liked 142 Times in 72 Posts
Photography is definitely subjective, as is all forms of art. Once you have a grasp of the fundamental rules, it's really enjoyable to break those rules and venture out of your comfort zone.

Also important to note that if you plan on taking your photography further, you may want to consider calibrating your monitor(s) for color and contrast accuracy. My workflow(which I have honed throughout the last 7 years) is such that my editing is for my ultimate end product, which is the print form(especially for my clients). Images on a monitor can greatly differ from those on an actual print. I also shoot in RAW format, which by nature, is flat in color and lacking in contrast - meant to be processed with software to one's liking. This format helps preserve the data within the image, allowing for the most latitude in retouching without being destructive to the files.

I rarely ever use a tripod unless I am doing a very low light long exposure. Even for macro shots, I usually shoot them handheld.


Some more pics to share:






















franswa is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 07:52 AM
  #37  
franswa
Senior Member
 
franswa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: ATX
Posts: 1,751
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 309 Post(s)
Liked 142 Times in 72 Posts
Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
Superb, Poprad. Or should I say… SUPER!

Muy sexy!
franswa is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 07:53 AM
  #38  
ScottRyder 
Photographer
 
ScottRyder's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: The other Cape, Cape Ann
Posts: 3,147
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 49 Posts
Lot's of good advice in this thread .. I'm usually a fan of bright, open shade. Sometimes a recent rain comes in handy too:



But bright sun can be just as effective:



Scott
__________________
ClassicFuji.posthaven.com.archive

IG @scottrydercycling
IG @scottryderphoto























ScottRyder is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 07:56 AM
  #39  
franswa
Senior Member
 
franswa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: ATX
Posts: 1,751
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 309 Post(s)
Liked 142 Times in 72 Posts
Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
Only thing I will add is this; lots of folks don't realize their cameras have a hard time zeroing in the autofocus on something as narrow as a bike frame tube, thus the focus falls on the background instead of the bike. Wide shots of the whole bike in front of a garage door are usually no problem. As long as what's behind the bike is quite close to the frame. Otherwise you get a nice, sharp pic of the background and the bike is slightly out. Happens in close-ups and detail shots mostly.

I will say, at the slight risk of offending Franswa, which is not my intention, but as an old film shooter, I don't care much for manipulated photos. I hate to say it but I like the original photo better than the doctored one shown above, which I immediately noticed had been "adjusted". I'm just old fashioned, I guess. It's a fine picture.
Fret not, my friend. If I were the type to be offended, I would never make it as a working photographer. We all have preferences and how we see things and choose to express them will not please everyone. I too shoot film(medium format) for my personal projects. With the different film emulsions, the colors/saturation/contrast was already baked into the process. It's not the case with digital and shooting RAW. JPG compression, however, does try to bake in those features, but at the detriment of the image in my opinion.
franswa is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 08:09 AM
  #40  
rootboy 
Senior Member
 
rootboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wherever
Posts: 16,756
Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 117 Times in 69 Posts
Well said, thanks. I'm with you on compression. Always shoot in RAW. Even with my meager, amateur gear.
Those shots you just posted are fantastic, Franswa. One can tell you are a pro, looking at those.

Originally Posted by franswa View Post
Fret not, my friend. If I were the type to be offended, I would never make it as a working photographer. We all have preferences and how we see things and choose to express them will not please everyone. I too shoot film(medium format) for my personal projects. With the different film emulsions, the colors/saturation/contrast was already baked into the process. It's not the case with digital and shooting RAW. JPG compression, however, does try to bake in those features, but at the detriment of the image in my opinion.
rootboy is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 08:12 AM
  #41  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 8,108

Bikes: '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '88 De Rosa Pro, '89 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1096 Post(s)
Liked 800 Times in 493 Posts
I have enjoyed the attempt at taking good pictures but fall short in so many ways. In any case I offer you bling:
[IMG]LC_FrntHub_05w by superissimo_83, on Flickr[/IMG]
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 03:01 PM
  #42  
eschlwc
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: on the beach
Posts: 4,859

Bikes: '73 falcon sr, '76 grand record, '84 davidson

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 11 Posts
@JetWave, when using a long exposure or nearly anytime i'm using the tripod, i use the 2-second delay feature, because no matter how gentle i am, the camera shakes when pressing the shutter release.
eschlwc is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 03:57 PM
  #43  
xiaoman1 
Awaiting Parole
 
xiaoman1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Weird Coast City of the Angels
Posts: 4,133

Bikes: A few too many

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 973 Post(s)
Liked 1,074 Times in 626 Posts
From my perspective, most important background or lack there of, boken and camera angle....maybe already said.
Regards, Ben
__________________
"STAND UP FOR WHAT IS RIGHT EVEN IF YOU ARE THE ONLY ONE STANDING"

xiaoman1 is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 04:06 PM
  #44  
poprad
Senior Member
 
poprad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: In transit
Posts: 1,611

Bikes: 07 Vanilla, 98 IRD road frame built up with 25th Ann DA, Surly cross check with 105 comp, 78 Raleigh Comp GS, 85 Centurionelli

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by eschlwc View Post
@JetWave, when using a long exposure or nearly anytime i'm using the tripod, i use the 2-second delay feature, because no matter how gentle i am, the camera shakes when pressing the shutter release.
That's a great tip, I do the same for any macro work on a tripod.
poprad is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 04:19 PM
  #45  
Chrome Molly 
Senior Member
 
Chrome Molly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Forksbent, MN
Posts: 3,271

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 13 Posts
I'm just happy when I get the actual subject and not my thumb.
Chrome Molly is offline  
Old 04-28-15, 10:00 PM
  #46  
franswa
Senior Member
 
franswa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: ATX
Posts: 1,751
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 309 Post(s)
Liked 142 Times in 72 Posts
Don't forget that your stance and body mechanics are key.

franswa is offline  
Old 04-29-15, 05:10 PM
  #47  
raymond1354
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 92
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
[h=2]Share your photography tips[/h]

Some of us take much nicer photographs of our bicycles and components than others (looking at you, @leegf). What are your secrets? Give tips on equipment, technique, et cetera.
There is some really solid advice here. Thank you.

I was wondering if there is a standard for photo documentation w.r.t. bikes and components. To give some background, in my real job, we often document things. There are standard distances, angles etc. for photos which are always taken at the same settings and with the same lens. It means that the views taken at one time can be compared to those taken at another time because there is no variation in technique. This really helps in assessing things.

Often, from what I have seen here, people request more photos when assessing a bike. If guidlines for photos don't exist, would it be worthwhile to work some out with all the experts?

Thanks

r
raymond1354 is offline  
Old 05-01-15, 04:51 PM
  #48  
MrB67
Member
 
MrB67's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: San Antonio TX
Posts: 40

Bikes: 2014 Cinelli Experience, 1995 Carrera Podium, 1984 Kuwahara Pulsar, 1982 Murray MTN. Bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That is a beautiful shot!
MrB67 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
MBurke
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
54
08-07-16 05:54 PM
Colorado Kid
Commuting
7
09-19-13 02:18 PM
vol
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
9
11-18-12 08:42 PM
bluefoxicy
Advocacy & Safety
10
05-20-11 07:11 PM
BlueDevil63
Classic & Vintage
36
12-27-10 08:34 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.