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Miyata one thousand

Old 06-09-15, 01:54 PM
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captbixley
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Miyata one thousand

Recently I pulled my Miyata one thousand, purchased new in 1984, out of the garage and started riding again after 20 year hiatus. I put new tires on and changed the toe clips to platforms. On one of my first outings I inadvertently went from one sidewalk to another which was about 3 or 4 ft lower. I belly flopped on the concrete: Cracked my helmet, cracked a rib, and suffered some bruising and minor road rash. I took my bike in for a tune up. Two days ago they finished and I picked it up and rode home. (previously I purchased a new helmet - I hope I get more than two or three rides out of each helmet). After I got home I noticed that the handle bars are bent. (I didn't notice it riding home nor did the shop notice when they worked on it.) I don't know if they are both bent or only one. I think I and the bike landed on our left side. I don't really like drop bars anymore so would not be adverse to replacing with straight bars. I read how much trouble that can be but the shifters and derailleurs should not be affected, right? Will I be able to reuse my brake levers? Is it safe to ride as is? How do I know if the frame is ok? Any help, comments, and encouragement are welcome.

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Old 06-09-15, 02:00 PM
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Bent.

Converting to flat bar shouldn't be too difficult.

Bar, levers, grips, cables. That's it.
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Old 06-09-15, 02:10 PM
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Since it is a steel frame it's probably OK unless you see some bends or bad ripples in the paint. I'd suggest that you inspect it very carefully, checking out the straightness of all the tubes, especially near the lugs (or have a bike mechanic do so if that doesn't sound like something you can do). With most flat bars you'll need to change the brake levers...depends a little on the shape of bars you end up with. Personally, I'd just try to bend the bars back since they don't seem that badly bent. There's a little bit of a risk since aluminum doesn't take as well to that treatment as steel, but it's probably fairly minimal. It's probably fine to ride as is.
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Old 06-09-15, 02:56 PM
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Dude, ditch the drop bars. Life is way too short to be hunched over in pain while trying to get some fresh air and exercise. I've converted about a dozen drop bar bikes to upright bars. It's an amazing upgrade. Very satisfying. You'll spend around $150 in parts for that bike because of the down tube shifters. Here's a very similar bike I converted. ......

It's got some combination brake levers & shifters made by Shimano on the handlebars. The carbon fiber road weenies really freak out when I blow past them doing 25mph.
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Old 06-09-15, 05:12 PM
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Ramzilla - Your rig looks good - you replaced the threaded stem with a threadless stem (do I have lingo right?) and the bifters are they indexed and will they work with my Shimano derailleurs with the friction shifters? Where did you get the bars?

Thx
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Old 06-09-15, 05:37 PM
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Replace your bars if they're bent.

My advice about drops or flat bars is that on flat bars, my hands are done after about mile 7. So I prefer drop bars, but you should do what's comfortable to you.

You should be able to find a plethora of stems that will suit your porpoises rather cheaply yet elegantly.

"Brifters" are generally considered the shifter/brake levers on drop bars- but I guess- those are integrated brake and shift levers.

Personally- If I were to go to a flat bar on that bike (which is a company Flagship model bike and considered one of the finest of all time) I would not skimp on what you'd be putting on there. I think you should look for some of the Suntour Power ratcheting thumb shifters. They're among the finest shifters ever and they were concurrent at the time of your bike's manufacture. Score a set of Bull Moose bars and some some Shimano Deore XT brake levers and you're in business.

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Old 06-09-15, 06:03 PM
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The drop bars that were on there look quite narrow relative to the size of the frame. I echo TGB's comments about bars. If your bars were uncomfortable, it might have been more a matter of positioning than bar style. I don't set mine as low as I used to, but I don't tolerate single hand positions for more than about 10 miles.

Absolutely shocked that your shop didn't notice the damage.
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Old 06-09-15, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
The drop bars that were on there look quite narrow relative to the size of the frame. I echo TGB's comments about bars. If your bars were uncomfortable, it might have been more a matter of positioning than bar style. I don't set mine as low as I used to, but I don't tolerate single hand positions for more than about 10 miles.

Absolutely shocked that your shop didn't notice the damage.
Yes! Consider a new shop unless you really like that one for some reason!
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Old 06-09-15, 08:46 PM
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+1, I'd be worried about frame damage wih bars bent that much. You should measure the frame and if it's a 58cm, just ship it to me for personal inspection.

On the plus side, you're halfway to making a set of randonneur bars!

I briefly converted a road bike to something similar to what @ramzilla made. I liked it for a while then had a hankering for going original... but not before I did a few centuries - one of which was mostly on gravel roads. If you don't like drops, you may as well go for something comfortable to keep you riding - we don't want anymore 20 gaps. Plus, it's not like you're carving something in stone.

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Old 06-09-15, 08:58 PM
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It's a regular threaded stem. An upright stem that would normally be found on a hybrid or mountain bike. I've got no idea what people are talking about when I hear about all the various riding positions on drop bars vs upright bars. It's a lot of bunk. IMHO if you want to go really fast - like average speed of 20mph - then use drop bars. If you just want to get some exercise - average 10 to 15mph - use upright bars. Upright handlebars are naturally more comfortable than drop bars.
The shifter brake combos came with cables included. It's a Trek 520 equipped with Deore RD. Indexing works fine.
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Old 06-09-15, 09:07 PM
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With drop bars, it's mainly hand positions (I count 6 that I personally use, though I spend 80%+ in 3 of them), but there are three rather distinct riding postures as well. On a mountain bike with extensions, I have 3 hand positions. With upright bars, there's one. Granted, there tends to be less weight on the hands with upright bars, but only one hand position.
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Old 06-09-15, 09:39 PM
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I agree with Golden Boy and USAZorro. If drop bars are uncomfortable or painful then you don't have your bike set up to fit you properly. It may be that you need to get someone to help fit you so that you don't have that problem. Also, from experience flat bars with a single hand position are terrible for riding any distance. Especially because you have an epic top of the line long distance tourer, I would humbly suggest that you experiment a bit before fundamentally changing its character.
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Old 06-09-15, 09:53 PM
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You could try trekking bars, they're pretty dorky looking, but if you go for longer rides that one hand position gets a bit uncomfortable. Then again I may be more prone to hand numbness than others.

Random internet photo.


No drops, but all the hand positions you could imagine.
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Old 06-09-15, 11:09 PM
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Originally Posted by davester View Post
Especially because you have an epic top of the line long distance tourer, I would humbly suggest that you experiment a bit before fundamentally changing its character.
I agree with this.

I'm curious about where on the bars the OP was riding at the time of the fall, and more about the whole sidewalk-to-sidewalk thing. @captbixley: Are you riding in the drops? Your not really liking drop bars "anymore" and your not noticing a really nasty dropoff has me wondering more about your posture than anything. Glad you're more or less okay and not just putting the bike away for another 20; many would.
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Old 06-10-15, 12:22 AM
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I simply cannot live without drop bars, but you may be different. It's a real pain for me if can't change hand positions several times per mile and a 30 mile ride on my MTB (flat bars) is the absolute max I can do.

On any of my road bikes, 60, 80, 100 miles; my hands are pretty happy. Tops, drops, flats, drops, hoods, drops, shoulders, drops... all day long.
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Old 06-10-15, 07:06 AM
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You definitely should replace the handlebar if bent, particularly on a bike that old. A broken bar could lead to another crash.

I would think twice about adding straight bars. Your Miyata is a touring bike not a hybrid or mountain bike. Drop bars give you a range of positions if you ever decide to tour or ride longer distances, and you can always ride on the bar tops or hoods. Rather than straight bars, check out some of the excellent shallow-drop handlebars such as the Soma Highway 1. Also consider a taller stem, such as a Nitto Deluxe or Technomic. With those changes, you might find that it is suddenly very comfortable riding on the bar tops, hoods and even drops. If you are dead-set against drops, at least consider some bullhorns, which give you two positions for your hands. Straight bars give you one position, period. On a long ride, or in windy weather, you may find yourself wishing you had a way to stretch out or become more aerodynamic.
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Old 06-10-15, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by captbixley View Post
On one of my first outings I inadvertently went from one sidewalk to another which was about 3 or 4 ft lower.

Did you mean to say 3 or 4 inches? Sounds really unsafe to have a 4 foot drop down to another sidewalk. Glad you are okay. Original dropbars are often too narrow IMO. Nitto makes dropbars with similar bends to the originals but wider. They also make taller stems.

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Old 06-10-15, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by captbixley View Post
I inadvertently went from one sidewalk to another which was about 3 or 4 ft lower.
I can't say that I've fallen off a bridge while riding, but anything is possible.
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Old 06-10-15, 10:12 AM
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Ignore anyone who tells you that any one style is inherently better than another without understanding whatever problem you're trying to solve.

I like both the narrow, randonneur bend handlebars that I have installed on two of my touring bikes and the "city" bend upright bars on my heavy city bike. I frequently take the heavy city bike on impromptu 30 or 40 mile rides in flat, extremely windy coastal areas and they suit my riding style and setup on that bike so well that I'm contemplating a nice city-bend bar conversion on one of my touring bikes to improve my comfort for long rides and keep me looking at the scenery.
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Old 06-10-15, 10:48 AM
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I also have a Miyata that I purchased new in 1984. I really like the bike but I just don't have the same flexibility that I did then. I do like the multiple hand positions of drop bars, so I bought a set of wider bars (42cm vs. 38cm) and a Nitto Technomic stem to mimic the position of my newer Jamis Quest that I find very comfortable. The only other change s new brake cables, but they needed done anyways. The bike still retained its classic look and I can ride it like I used to.
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Old 06-10-15, 11:08 AM
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Thanks to everyone for their contributions to this thread -
My fall: I was on the sidewalk parallel to the street about a half block from my destination. I am not sure exactly how it happened. Maybe my foot came off the pedal, maybe I was trying to change gears, I don't know for sure but I got wobbly and unstable which would have been a momentary thing if not for the stairway leading off to my right. About three or four steps down to the sidewalk leading away from the street to the back of the building. Then BAM and it was all over. I made it to my apt and afterwards actually road my bike to the nearest bus route - put my bike on the bus rack and rode the rest of the way home. Now I have healed and want to get going again. I once rode across the state of Washington, from Seattle to the Tri-Cities but now I am looking forward to 10 mile rides or shorter.

I really didn't appreciate what I had - but now I agree that I should retain the touring character of down tube bars. Would it make sense to install an adapter tube and an angled (17 degree) stem so that the down tube bars would be up and back some. I feel comfortable riding more up right but then my fingertips just reach the top of the handle bar. Sometimes my hands are on the hoods, but rarely down on the bottoms.

What about moving the shifters to the handle bars? Friction shifters? Index shifters - does than mean a new derailleur?
Thanks again for all the input.
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Old 06-10-15, 11:38 AM
  #22  
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@captbixley - Despite some comments, the handle bars (drop) were straight prior to forming to the drop configuration. Age is not a factor in discriminating against the current handlebar (its not wood with bugs in it!). You can bend the bar back by making sure it is secured properly and use a 2x4 of some length to control the force. Bend slowly and check frequently. Drillium Dude, while in DG, bent one side of his drops and bent it back. Don't think he ever replaced it. I did the same thing with my Pinarello. Everyone thinks that because they are made of AL, they will break with the slightest force. Not true. They were bent to their current configuration using tools to make sure the tube didn't collapse but the material selection required a reasonable amount of deformation without failure by design. Shouldn't do it too many times but one more time won't hurt if you are careful.

I am making my own Dirt Drops from road bars:
[IMG]P1030009 on Flickr[/IMG]

I commute on two different bikes, the "truck" is a RockHopper with bar extensions. Doesn't matter which position I use, my hands tingle on every ride. My other "commuter" bike has drops and my hands never tingle. There is something to be said about drops versatile configuration and it speaks through the variety and quantity of them around. Put them where you need them. Sometimes it takes some time and experimentation.

I applaud you returning to the world of two wheels, especially with the bike you left with! I went 30 years before returning. The only tragedy was the loss of the bike due to an uninsured motorist who didn't see me and some personal permanent damage. I am lucky and appreciate the use of my body for the years I have had it!

Good idea to start slow and build up. You will come back based on how much effort you put into it.

There are threadless stems with 35 degree angles too, if you choose. Just pick what you think will work and go from there.

Shifters can be nearly anywhere. The limit is what you want to spend and how comfortable or easy it is to use them. Indexing may require new RD depending on the shifters. It is about the index "spacing" of the lever. It must line up with the spacing on the rear cluster of sprockets (not cogs). In addition, you will need a cable length adjuster. I added one to a Suntour Superbe Pro RD, that didn't have one built in, to use with the index shifters.

Good to know you are healed.
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Old 06-10-15, 11:41 AM
  #23  
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You can find friction-type stem-mounted or handlebar-mounted shifters. They would be your best bet, as they wouldn't require you to change derailleurs. Going to indexed is expensive and complicated on an old bike. I don't think it's worth it.
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Old 06-10-15, 11:53 AM
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As we get older it is not unusual to want a more upright position when riding - especially if you have neck or back issues - I use a Nitto Technomic stem on two of my bikes, and they are typically 55 - 60 cm. They have a recent version that allows a bit more height, I believe from around 180 mm in the original to about 225mm or so. Also you could get some Velo Orange Grand Cru randonneur handlebars, they have one that was recently introduced that is 48 cm wide - measured at the drops so at the brake hoods it is approx. 7 cm narrower as they flare out where measured, still giving a 41 cm width. Because they also rise from the stem to the hoods you get more height and quite a few people like rando handlebars - you can look into them and see what you think - I find them quite good.

You also might want to look into some earlier Campagnolo ergo shifters that are integrated with the brake levers. Not sure if you have a 5 or 6 speed freewheel but there is an adapter that attaches where your shift cable enters the rear derailleur called the ShiftMate that allows many different combinations between various years of Campy Ergo shifters and freewheels. There is a chart that was provided by a site that shows which combinations work together by themselves as well ( ctc.org.uk ). I use Campagnolo brifters on two of my bikes and find them easy to use and well worth having, both with Shimano rear derailleurs and cassettes ( 9 speed ). I am pretty certain that a pre year 2000 8 speed ergo shifter will work with earlier Shimano 5 speed freewheels. None of this is cheap of course but well worth it on a bike you intend to use and want to be comfortable on. I will not deny that it is nice to shift and keep your hands on the bars!
i
There are deals on Ebay if you look and the V.O. handlebars are 60.00, the Nitto stem around the same, sometimes cheaper, ShiftMate about 25.00 if needed and the Campy ergo shifters around 100.00 a pair and up depending on the year and model. It is all relative of course and your Miyata 1000 is a worthy bike, certainly worth investing in but of course it is your decision but being well informed does help. Here is a picture of my '81 Fuju S12S - a 150.00 frame that I put almost 2000.00 into but could not be happier regarding the final results. It has a ShftMate on it and the V.O. bars, Nitto stem and 2009 Campagnolo 10 speed brifters with a Shinamo 9 speed XT rear derailleur and Shimano 9 speed 11-34 cassette.









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Old 06-10-15, 11:58 AM
  #25  
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fwiw - it looks to me that the right hand portion of the bar is as it should be, and only the left side would need to be returned to shape. disclaimer is that I am basing this on a single, two dimensional view.
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