Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Vintage Racing Bicycle Gearing

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Vintage Racing Bicycle Gearing

Old 06-24-15, 08:00 AM
  #1  
Jicafold
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 904
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 59 Posts
Vintage Racing Bicycle Gearing

So my 1988ish Bianchi has a 12 speed setup with a 52 - 42 up front and a 6 speed rear freewheel which ranges from 13 - 21. So my low gearing of 42 x 21 is pretty tall. Too tall to get up the hill outside my neighborhood. So what's with the gearing provided back then? Was everybody racing everywhere on relatively flat land? Assuming the earth's topography hasn't changed since then...I don't get it. I really should put a 13 - 24 back there. On the other hand, although modern bikes tend to have at least a large 24 tooth sprocket, what's with the 11 tooth gear on today's cassettes? I mean really? 11 teeth? You'd have to be flying down the Pyrenees to use anything like that.
Jicafold is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 08:12 AM
  #2  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 39,962

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 486 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6898 Post(s)
Liked 1,537 Times in 970 Posts
People liked racing bikes even though they didn't race them. I would put on a freewheel with a 28T low, because it's still not low enough, you won't need to change your derailleurs. It was a matter of prestige to be seen with a small freewheel, because it made you look strong.

Chainrings are a little smaller now. Often the big one is now 50T rather than 52T or 53T, so that kinda sorta explains why there are 11T high gear cogs.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 08:14 AM
  #3  
Bandera
~>~
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: TX Hill Country
Posts: 5,932
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Liked 168 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by Jicafold View Post
So what's with the gearing provided back then?
Racing cyclists were strong and well conditioned "back when" and used to the gearing.
13-18 for crits, 13-21 for road racing & training & 13-24 for mountain stages.

A race bike can be considered C&V if the current owner can't hack the original gearing.
Here's a pic of mine that was 53/42 13-21 when I built it and recently modified to 53/39 13-25 10 cog since I can't hack it either anymore.......



-Bandera
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Vitus_1.jpg (96.9 KB, 1469 views)

Last edited by Bandera; 06-24-15 at 09:48 AM.
Bandera is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 08:16 AM
  #4  
ijsbrand
Senior Member
 
ijsbrand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: the Low countries
Posts: 283

Bikes: 1980 Koga Miyata Gents Touring; 1980 Koga Miyata Gents Racer; 1980 Koga Miyata Roadspeed; and aiming for the rest of that year's brochure

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Jicafold View Post
Was everybody racing everywhere on relatively flat land? Assuming the earth's topography hasn't changed since then...I don't get it. I really should put a 13 - 24 back there.
Over the decades, fashions change in whether you should grind or spin. In the 1970s and 1980s, and even later grinding big gears was en vogue [Read Tim Krabbé's The Rider, watch cycling classics from that age]. Only when Lance Armstrong started to spin again, the fashion changed.

Be glad you still got a 21.
ijsbrand is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 08:17 AM
  #5  
WalksOn2Wheels
Vain, But Lacking Talent
 
WalksOn2Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Denton, TX
Posts: 5,510

Bikes: Trek Domane 5.9 DA 9000, Trek Crockett Pink Frosting w/105 5700

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 42 Posts
The basic answer is advances in modern drivetrains. There was a limit on how many teeth an FD could jump, in this case 10 teeth. And on the rear, you wanted to avoid large jumps in gearing, so with a limited 6 speeds, trying to keep a close range across the cassette means taller gearing overall.

Others can weigh in on where your bike fits historically gearing-wise. My ~87 Specialized Sirrus had the exact same stock gearing. I think it was more common to have a larger separation between racing/recreation bikes and touring bikes. Triples were much more common to increase gear range.

My modernized Bianchi has a 53/39 with an 11-27 10 speed in the rear. Between my Sirrus and the Bianchi, that's a 2:1 vs/ 3.55:1 final drive ratio. That's a huge jump. It's fun to like vintage frames and hate on carbon, but modern drivetrains offer some huge advantages.
WalksOn2Wheels is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 08:20 AM
  #6  
WalksOn2Wheels
Vain, But Lacking Talent
 
WalksOn2Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Denton, TX
Posts: 5,510

Bikes: Trek Domane 5.9 DA 9000, Trek Crockett Pink Frosting w/105 5700

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
People liked racing bikes even though they didn't race them. I would put on a freewheel with a 28T low, because it's still not low enough, you won't need to change your derailleurs. It was a matter of prestige to be seen with a small freewheel, because it made you look strong.

Chainrings are a little smaller now. Often the big one is now 50T rather than 52T or 53T, so that kinda sorta explains why there are 11T high gear cogs.
Most of the road bikes sold by manufacturers come in either "compact" or "double" gearing where the front rings are 50/34 or 53/39 repsectively. 50/34 is super common on pretty much everything. Even my high end Dura Ace carbon bike came with a 50/34, but mostly because it's marketed as an "endurance" bike. I changed the front rings...
WalksOn2Wheels is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 08:43 AM
  #7  
Jicafold
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 904
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 59 Posts
I'm not sure that the Campagnolo Victory rear derailleur would handle a 28 tooth capacity. Perhaps. Rummaging through my cranksets I found a Sugino 38 tooth chainring. Does that fit a Stronglight crankset? One way to find out...
Jicafold is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 08:46 AM
  #8  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 22,599

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 906 Post(s)
Liked 322 Times in 242 Posts
Originally Posted by Jicafold View Post
So my 1988ish Bianchi has a 12 speed setup with a 52 - 42 up front and a 6 speed rear freewheel which ranges from 13 - 21. So my low gearing of 42 x 21 is pretty tall. Too tall to get up the hill outside my neighborhood. So what's with the gearing provided back then? Was everybody racing everywhere on relatively flat land? Assuming the earth's topography hasn't changed since then...I don't get it. I really should put a 13 - 24 back there. On the other hand, although modern bikes tend to have at least a large 24 tooth sprocket, what's with the 11 tooth gear on today's cassettes? I mean really? 11 teeth? You'd have to be flying down the Pyrenees to use anything like that.
Go back to the 1970s, and it is even more severe. I had a mid 1970s Peugeot, front crank had 51/49 chain rings. 49 for the small ring? I mean, what's the point??
wrk101 is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 09:01 AM
  #9  
satbuilder 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Southern Maryland
Posts: 1,345

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 219 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 38 Posts
I photograph mine with a 12-17, but ride with something age appropriate...
satbuilder is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 09:12 AM
  #10  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 7,907

Bikes: '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '88 De Rosa Pro, '90 De Rosa Professional, '91 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1034 Post(s)
Liked 695 Times in 434 Posts
Need pics guys!
This is what came on my 1972 Motobecane Le Champion as stock:
[IMG]Cyclo-Competition 14-15-17-19-21, on Flickr[/IMG]

Of course the large ring was 52 and the small was 40.
[IMG][URL="https://flic.kr/p/j7nzQ8"]Stronglight Cranks inside on Flickr[/IMG]
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 09:16 AM
  #11  
Bad Lag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 1,445

Bikes: 1975 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 534 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 92 Posts
Drafting in a large pack of riders allows you to push taller gears more easily.

Push a 52-11? No.

But using or needing 52-15, instead of the usual 52-17? Yes.
Bad Lag is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 09:18 AM
  #12  
Bandera
~>~
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: TX Hill Country
Posts: 5,932
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Liked 168 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
49 for the small ring? I mean, what's the point??
It's Half-step gearing, what the generation of racing cyclists just before mine rode.

"With half-step gearing, the larger shifts were made with the rear derailer, and the front was for fine tuning. This allowed an 8- or 10-speed set up to have a reasonable range with fairly close spacing of the gears."
-Sheldon Brown

My '68 Paramount came 52/49 14-24 OEM, going 52/42 was easy gearing and considered a dubious affectation by the old guard.

Let's not forget John Howard: "52T chainrings don't cut it."

-Bandera
Bandera is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 09:26 AM
  #13  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 18,692

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 161 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5190 Post(s)
Liked 1,791 Times in 1,168 Posts
I rode with a 53-39, 12-21 7 speed freewheel very happily for a long time. Fast forward a few (ahem) years and while I'm still riding the same bike, the gearing has changed. I now ride a 46-36-26 triple and a 12-24 7 speed freewheel. My knees are happier.

bikemig is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 09:34 AM
  #14  
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,642

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 42 Times in 27 Posts
Old school race bike gearing was for a superbly conditioned man with monster legs and only 150 lb body weight. And even they changed freewheels for the course. One of my bikes, a late 1970s race bike, came with 53/42 x 12-17 . . . I'm sure the original owner only used that gearing for time trials.
jyl is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 10:20 AM
  #15  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 20,291

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2847 Post(s)
Liked 839 Times in 584 Posts
Originally Posted by Jicafold View Post
So my 1988ish Bianchi has a 12 speed setup with a 52 - 42 up front and a 6 speed rear freewheel which ranges from 13 - 21. So my low gearing of 42 x 21 is pretty tall. Too tall to get up the hill outside my neighborhood. So what's with the gearing provided back then? Was everybody racing everywhere on relatively flat land? Assuming the earth's topography hasn't changed since then...I don't get it.
That's how my '88 Bianchi Premio came to me as well, in 2012. The seller had apparently done Bike Across Bama with this gearing, too!

At the time I got it, though, I quickly realized I couldn't hack the gearing -- I rarely needed to shift to the big ring, never used the 52/13, and on hills I got to the 42/21 before I knew it and wished for lower gears.

My gearing became an odyssey: I first replaced the freewheel with a 14-28T, an immediate improvement. Swapped the small ring to a 39T, which provided a little more relief on longer climbs. The stock (?) crank had bosses for a granny ring, so I ultimately added a 32T granny and switched to a long-cage derailleur, which served me well for the remainder of my first brevet season.

Not long after that, I started riding my fixed-gear a lot, and that opened my eyes to what one could accomplish without really low gears. So since then, I've been weaning myself off of the lowest gears. All of the road bikes are back to 130BCD doubles, and my Bianchi Premio now has a 42/24 low. My much-ridden Bianchi Eros has a 39/23 low gear, and I'm flirting with the idea of bumping that up to a 42/21 and see if there are any hills I can't climb in that combo.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498

Last edited by ThermionicScott; 06-24-15 at 10:28 AM.
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 10:36 AM
  #16  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 20,460

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 988 Post(s)
Liked 404 Times in 294 Posts
When I worked at a Peugeot/Nishiki dealership in the early 1970s, the Peugeot PA-10s, PR-10s, and PX-10s came geared 52-45/14-21, and almost every customer wanted to replace the freewheel with a 14-26. I usually recommended something like 52-42/14-26, which gave a nice 1.5-step progression from 44 to 100 gear-inches. The classic "alpine" 1.5-step of 52-40/14-28 could also be made to work, if one was careful with chain length and rear wheel positioning.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 10:39 AM
  #17  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 20,460

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 988 Post(s)
Liked 404 Times in 294 Posts
Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Go back to the 1970s, and it is even more severe. I had a mid 1970s Peugeot, front crank had 51/49 chain rings. 49 for the small ring? I mean, what's the point??
A two-tooth drop is too narrow, but a three-tooth drop in front works beautifully with a 2-to-3-tooth progression in back.

My UO-8: 45-42/13-15-17-20-23-26
My 1960 Capo: 49-46/14-16-18-20-23-26

Want a lower bottom end? Half-step-plus-granny is a great way to go:
My PKN-10, before I gave it to my son: 48-45-34/13-15-17-19-21-24, which worked with a short-cage SunTour Cyclone II
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 10:56 AM
  #18  
Bandera
~>~
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: TX Hill Country
Posts: 5,932
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Liked 168 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
I started riding my fixed-gear a lot, and that opened my eyes to what one could accomplish without really low gears.
The key to old school training: FG base miles to develop a smooth supple high cadence pedaling style w/ big grunt on demand.
It builds character.

-Bandera
Bandera is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 11:25 AM
  #19  
gaucho777 
Senior Member
 
gaucho777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Berkeley, CA
Posts: 6,866

Bikes: '72 Cilo Pacer, '72 Gitane Gran Tourisme, '72 Peugeot PX10, '73 Speedwell Ti, '74 Nishiki Competition, '74 Peugeot UE-8, '75 Peugeot PR-10L, '85 De Rosa Pro, '86 Look Equipe 753, '86 Look KG86, '89 Parkpre Team, '90 Parkpre Team MTB, '90 Merlin

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Liked 570 Times in 222 Posts
Extract from GitaneUSA/Bernard Hinault interview:

Ok. There is a question about gears. What was the typical gearing used in an ITT ?
Typically it was 54x12 or sometimes 53, maybe 55 once I think…then again it largely depended on the profile of the race, it means nothing without it. If the wind comes from the tail you can try an extra teeth, if it’s up front you can go down to 53x17 instead of 12…It means nothing…

I think the question is also to see if things have changed a lot since then…
I don’t think they get much bigger than we did…

Same question for the mountains?
I think the smallest I’ve used is 41x25 or 42x25.
Gitane USA - BERNARD HINAULT
gaucho777 is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 11:50 AM
  #20  
crank_addict
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 7,152
Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 395 Times in 260 Posts
52-11t in the flats.... sure.... with a nice tailwind

Should take a look at the many images on the net of racers and try to zoom in. Look at the crankarms, chainwheels, cogs. Training and the mindset is completely different today, but its kind of interesting to look at some past great climbers. Charly Gaul was known to spin while Luis Ocana was about grinding out on big gears.

edit: As for Merckx, what else hasn't been said? Even with his record, not regarded as an all-time KOM but rather brute discipline of the 'highest' order.

Last edited by crank_addict; 06-24-15 at 11:56 AM.
crank_addict is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 11:59 AM
  #21  
crank_addict
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 7,152
Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 395 Times in 260 Posts
Three words:
Save your knees

The great thing today is the abundant combo's and parts to set-up ones old bike. Take advantage of it.
crank_addict is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 12:24 PM
  #22  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 39,962

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 486 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6898 Post(s)
Liked 1,537 Times in 970 Posts
I guess I could brag. I can still manage on those old gearing systems. I merely choose not to. My technique for tough hills is to stop and rest when I need to, catch my breath, then proceed. For a long time, my McLean had 52x42 in front and 14x24 in back. Eventually, I used a 13x28 in the rear.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 12:50 PM
  #23  
big chainring 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Wilmette, IL
Posts: 7,012
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Liked 390 Times in 201 Posts
Long ago in my yute I bought a Motobecane LeChampion, my first racing bike. The bike shop was willing to customize my gearing at no charge. Being a Junior catagory racer, 15 yrs old, I got a 49/52 with a 15-24 freewheel. It worked out well.

Then when I turned Senior I went with a 42/52 and 13-18 six speed. Had to be a really steep hill to use the 42-18 in a race.

I remember Dag Otto Lauritzen in a race in Ripon Wisconsin. The course was a criterium, short steep climb and long gradual decline. About a mile around. Most everyone went to their small ring on the climb. Dag Otto just stomped up on his big ring. He eventually broke away and won the race, mainly because he could just muscle up the climb faster than anyone else.
big chainring is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 02:14 PM
  #24  
Jicafold
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 904
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 59 Posts
So it appears that a Sugino chainring will not fit on a Stronglight crankset. Going back to the rear of the bike...what brand of hubs are these? The freewheel is a Regina and the skewers are Miche. I do have a 6 speed Shimano 12 - 28 on the shelf. Is the threading the same?

Touring....who are they trying to kid anyway.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
004.jpg (93.9 KB, 1308 views)
File Type: jpg
006.jpg (98.4 KB, 1304 views)
Jicafold is offline  
Old 06-24-15, 02:19 PM
  #25  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 39,962

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 486 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6898 Post(s)
Liked 1,537 Times in 970 Posts
Those look like Miche hubs. There are not many French threaded hubs around, so you are probably safe. There are a few Italian threaded hubs, and yours could be one. It's OK to mix Italian and English threads in this place, as long as you don't do it too often. They are very close.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.