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70s Weinmann Sidepulls -- Pros and Cons?

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70s Weinmann Sidepulls -- Pros and Cons?

Old 06-30-15, 05:45 PM
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70s Weinmann Sidepulls -- Pros and Cons?

Yes, I know we're all fans of center pull brakes around here, but I've got a 77 Raleigh Sports that may get stripped here pretty soon. I almost never ride it and the market ain't buying (admittedly at the high end of fair). My wife loves the idea of moving the S-A wheelset onto her '64 Collegiate, and I'm wondering if the brakes are good enough to use or if they should go with the frame and most of the rest to the co-op.

Rear is a model 810, front is a 7-- (not at home to get the exact number), so the longish reach means versatility. But how do they stack up against other side pulls of the era? They're original to the bike.

And in the interest of beating somebody to the punch:
Cons: Side pull.
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Old 06-30-15, 07:47 PM
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Most single-pivot sidepull calipers that are in good working order are pretty similar in stopping power, which is dictated by the dimensions (leverage). I recommend aero brake handles (10% more braking force, in exchange for 10% longer lever handle travel), KoolStop pads, and high quality low-compression cable housings. Assuming you have aluminum rims, this should provide a short stopping distance.
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Old 06-30-15, 07:54 PM
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I've never liked those and sold off a whole lot a while back. I've always found them more clumsy and difficult to adjust in comparison to more modern sidepulls.
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Old 06-30-15, 08:02 PM
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They work fine. Maybe not super stiff. Using the newer brake pads with curved washers for adjustable toe in makes setup easy.
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Old 06-30-15, 08:09 PM
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They suck if you live somewhere with a lot of steep hills with stop signs at the bottom. Makes my hands hurt just thinking about it. Cool stop salmon pads are a must.
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Old 06-30-15, 09:38 PM
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The centerpulls stop better.

That said, I put some diacompe 500's on a sports and it worked much better than stock.
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Old 06-30-15, 09:59 PM
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Originally Posted by lord_athlon View Post
The centerpulls stop better.

That said, I put some diacompe 500's on a sports and it worked much better than stock.
Log ago, Weinmann 500's were pretty good comparison to the contemporaries. Downside, no wrench flats like Camagnolo ( their patent) and no quick release in the caliper.
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Old 06-30-15, 10:46 PM
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Have the Weinmann 506 sidepull calipers, Motobecane labeled, made in West Germany on a 1978 bike. They also have the wheel releases. Fresh built this year and installed DiaCompe pads. A little different dialing in the center pivot, but they work excellent. The Weinmann levers have some factory drillium effort going on. I'm glad to have them for the specific build. Kind of different too.

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Old 06-30-15, 11:41 PM
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Thanks all around. If the bike doesn't go away soon I'll start the carnage, and the brakes will make the "keep for further consideration" list.
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Old 07-01-15, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by repechage View Post
Log ago, Weinmann 500's were pretty good comparison to the contemporaries. Downside, no wrench flats like Camagnolo ( their patent) and no quick release in the caliper.
You just need a Park OBW-3 tool to center them and levers with quick releases.

Set them up carefully and give them good pads and they're pretty decent brakes.


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Old 07-01-15, 06:38 AM
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I actually used Weinmann sidepulls on a '63 Rudge Sports I rode in the mid-80s, and they were a considerable upgrade over the stock Raleigh brakes - and that was with the stock chromed steel rims.

In the last 20 years or so I have used several variants of Weinmann sidepulls, including ancient Weinmann Jr., 730s, and currently a set of 500s. Run good salmon Scott Matthauser or Kool Stop pads with good lined cables and they work just fine.

And +1 on getting the Park OBW-3 tool. It makes working on these a snap, and I wish I'd had one back when ...
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Old 07-01-15, 07:39 AM
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Advantages: quite light weight and abundantly available

Disadvantage: mediocre stopping power compared with modern dual-pivot calipers.
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Old 07-01-15, 08:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Grand Bois View Post
You just need a Park OBW-3 tool to center them and levers with quick releases.

Set them up carefully and give them good pads and they're pretty decent brakes.

I ran a set of 500's on my training bike long ago, they stopped well, but worked better after I hot rodded them, by facing the pivot faces on a mill and using Campagnolo pivot washers.
The Park tool for centering brakes did not exist then, it was drift punch and a mallet to finesse them center.
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Old 07-01-15, 01:24 PM
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Cons, trying to find one of these, for the 605's
so I don't have to use the hammer and screwdriver method.

Does someone know the actual size of that bolt?
4.5mm is to big, 4mm is to small.

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Old 07-01-15, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Rocky Gravol View Post
Cons, trying to find one of these, for the 605's
so I don't have to use the hammer and screwdriver method.

Does someone know the actual size of that bolt?
4.5mm is to big, 4mm is to small. ...
4mm = 5.04/32"
Have you tried 11/64"?
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Old 07-01-15, 08:32 PM
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I took a long, loaded, hilly tour on a bike with these brakes. I had to strengthen my hands along the way. I was able to stop as much as I needed, but I really had to work it. Lucky I was blessed with big hands. I don't recommend these brakes. Use either center pulls or dual pivots.

I have a bike with Campagnolo Record sidepulls. They are outstanding, because they're made like tanks. Pretty tanks. Quality matters in a brake of this design.
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Old 07-01-15, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I have a bike with Campagnolo Record sidepulls. They are outstanding, because they're made like tanks. Pretty tanks. Quality matters in a brake of this design.
Also noted.
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