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In need of European vintage-esque bike expertise

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In need of European vintage-esque bike expertise

Old 07-30-15, 09:35 PM
  #1  
Elizabeth21
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In need of European vintage-esque bike expertise

I am not sure if this is the right type of forum to post my question on, so if it is not, my apologies.

However, my question IS in regard to vintage bikes...sort of...

Recently, I started looking to purchase a bike, and was after a vintage style, European-esque (if that is a word) bike. However, I know nothing (like, zip...nada...niente....) about bikes, let alone vintage ones or ones that try to pose as vintage ones.

So, I did what any American on-a-hunt to be vintage (or vintage-esque) would do - I went to my local bike shop! I know, brilliant, right? Go me.

There I was presented with a selection of ELECTRA bikes...as in, EEE-LEC-TRAAAA! It's Electric baby! Wooo-hooo!

Not.

Really.

The "Townie" seemed to be perhaps one of the only bikes on peoples minds, and to me, that did not say vintage. AT. ALL.

When I mentioned vintage, I was told, "oh yeah, sure, those are fine - I have one in my flower garden holding some plants!" Then I was politely reminded of all the modern conveniences of the Townie, as if I had just emerged from the dark ages and had a LOT to be re-programmed on.

Some people seemed to live, breathe, and eat Townies (maybe that is why they all seemed so constipated?)...and if they didn't, they either looked down on the vintage idea or were polite enough to humor me at the least.

Now armed with the Electra Bible (er, catalogue) I went back and forth trying to find something that worked...until I gave up and scanned the internet.

At this point, my confusion just got worse. Company after company seemed to pop up out of nowhere, touting their vintage-y looking bikes, but with no way to see one, test one, ride one, or have any idea what was a good bike and what was not.

That is why I have wandered in here, seeking the expertise of others who know much more than me (and who will not try to re-program my vintage brain).

My question therefore is: if I am looking for a vintage-style bike, with the skirt, the rear rack, the wicker baskets to shop with, and the total vintage look, what bikes are known for their quality? Which companies should I avoid, and which ones should I check out? I am in the USA if that helps.

Right now, the Amsterdam by Electra seems to be about my only choice, as almost all the other bikes out there I know nothing about.

To anyone who can offer suggestions and help, thank you! You rock!

Last edited by Elizabeth21; 07-30-15 at 09:46 PM.
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Old 07-30-15, 11:33 PM
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I take it you are looking for a step through city bike for light commutes, getting around the neighborhood or town, etc. My wife has a Biria city bike and she absolutely loves it. She uses it to commute to work and takes it out for laps around the neighborhood, she likes it that much. Hers has a 3 speed internal hub, but they make a model with a 7 speed dérailleur if you need more gears.

Mixte the is the term often used for the step through bike. Many here can comment on vintage makes of these types. Biria is a modern bike and we got my wife's new.

Bicycles | Biria Bicycles
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Old 07-30-15, 11:44 PM
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Pashley cycles comes to mind.

British Bicycle Company
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Old 07-31-15, 03:17 AM
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How much are you willing to spend?



Bicycles
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Old 07-31-15, 03:40 AM
  #5  
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And are considering an actual vintage bike, or do you prefer something modern with a vintage look? With the latter, obviously, you run into the problem of what someone thinks is a vintage look, like that Electra.
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Old 07-31-15, 04:23 AM
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a look at Velouria's reviews on her Lovely Bicycle Blog might help you.
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Old 07-31-15, 04:55 AM
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No one has said it yet so I will: Welcome to C&V!

Many of us here (or at least I) tend to be road-bike-centric but not all. Some, sixty-fiver comes to mind, are decidedly omni-centric. So yes you have come to the right place.
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Old 07-31-15, 05:58 AM
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Sounds like you have already gotten some great advice...decide on what you want (being as specific as you can)...and you will find a lot of help here! If you happen to live in the Atlanta area, we have a shop in the Decatur part of town that might also be able to help you out...
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Old 07-31-15, 06:05 AM
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Do you have a pic you can provide a link to of what you are looking for? Then we can narrow down whether you want a Mixte, Dutch, Loop, or Step Thru frame style and make appropriate recommendations. Also take a peak at

Men's and Women's Bicycles | Shinola®
Lugged Steel Bicycles, Wool Clothing, Leather Saddles & Canvas Bike Bags from Rivendell Bicycle Works
Vintage Dutch Style City Bikes - Custom Bicycles | Papillionaire USA


If you only want to spend a few hundred rather than a few thousand dollars, several of the members here have inventories of reconditioned used bikes that might float your boat.

If you don't mind sharing what city you live in, we can point you to the vintage bike friendly shops as well.
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Old 07-31-15, 07:26 AM
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Elizabeth21, where are you located approx?
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Old 07-31-15, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Elizabeth21 View Post
I am in the USA if that helps.
Welcome! And USA is a good starting point but if you narrow it down to state or region within a state, that'll help even more! it would also help to know what your budget is and how hilly the area you live in is (might change whether a heavy Dutch bike or British 3-speed is better or something with more gears).

I second Big Block's suggestion to peruse LovelyBicycle.
Here are a few of her entries that might be particularly useful for you: Lovely Bicycle!: Lovely Bicycles on a Budget: Vintage vs Modern (vintage vs modern)
Lovely Bicycle!: Choosing a Transportation Bicycle? Some Ideas to Consider (things to consider when buying a bike)

And reviews of specific bikes, such as the Pashley Princess - Lovely Bicycle!: The Pashley Princess: a Retrospective from a Former Owner
The Papillionaire Sommer - Lovely Bicycle!: Fluttering About: the Papillionaire Sommer
The Bobbin Bramble - Lovely Bicycle!: A Go on the Bobbin Bramble

and the true vintage option, a Raleigh Lady's Sports - Lovely Bicycle!: Review of "Lucy 3-Speed": a Raleigh Lady's Sports
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Old 07-31-15, 12:33 PM
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Another couple of brands that aren't too terribly expensive:
Linus
Public
@oddjob2 is also correct, lots of us have, er, too many vintage bikes and wouldn't mind culling the herd. But you need to do that locally. Again, let us know your approximate location (urban area) and we can certainly suggest some shops or individual sellers that we've vetted and feel comfortable dealing with. I'm in the Portland, OR area, you can't throw a stick without hitting a bike shop that would satisfy your needs.

Also, depending on where you live, there are shops that sell used, perhaps even "upcycled" bikes. Take an old, vintage steel frame in good condition, modify, paint, new bits, and viola:
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Old 07-31-15, 01:12 PM
  #13  
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I hate to say it, especially in this forum, but I have seen and ridden one and it ain't bad, for the money - Bikes Direct.

Please forgive me.



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Old 07-31-15, 01:33 PM
  #14  
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Is this the "Look" you seek?

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Old 07-31-15, 04:22 PM
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If you're anywhere close to the Boston area, a small shop opened in the last couple of years catering to folks with similar interests:

Bicycle Belle
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Old 07-31-15, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
If you're anywhere close to the Boston area, a small shop opened in the last couple of years catering to folks with similar interests:

Bicycle Belle
Also Curious Velo
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Old 07-31-15, 04:52 PM
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It won't have the skirt you're' looking for but the Libertas Mixte I just picked up for my wife couldn't' possibly be Reynolds 531 because the lugs and the frame is so rough (from the factory). However, it is one of the lightest steel bikes I've ever seen, and a mixte no less. Its so much zoomier than her Schwinn Suburban. You can find very good Libertas Townie or Mixte bikes, with Reynolds main tubes or even a complete Reynolds tube set. Most Libertas bikes don't have a market. They are an unknown Belgian brand in the US.

In the States we know Colnago because they focused their marketing on the US market. Masi considered the US market so critical they moved to California. Olmo could have cared less about the US market and only some of their lowest end bikes showed up in some of the mail order catalogs. They were imported, but they didn't advertise here and the importing was done by a entrepreneur not their effort. So the reason we can find vintage old Colnagos and the US thinks they are better bikes than say the rest of Europe, is because of the advertising campaign and strategic focus of Colnago on the US market. Pinarello, not as much but who has more

Libertas was imported, but our bike is very low end. The shock is what a great bike it still is, even thirty-five to forty years later. Other than the tires and a ripped seat nothing on the bike needs replaced. Heck, I don't even need to grease and lube the hub or BB as its been properly maintained. In reality though I'd want to get her one, there is no reason whatsoever to continue to search out for the higher end Reynolds 531 Libertas. Her Libertas mixte frame is just stupid light. Doing a couple of minutes of research online a lot of people that fell into Libertas were as shocked as we were by how light the bikes built up.



Current run Olmo urban bikes:

Olmo Bikes - Urbanas

I'd love to be able to walk into a bike shop and buy Italian beauties like those. My wife would already have one. I'd have a huge fight trying to get her to wear a vintage wool Olmo jersey, though.
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Old 07-31-15, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by mtnbke View Post
Masi considered the US market so critical they moved to California.
Um, that's not quite the way it went down though it might look like that now. It's actually a long story. Faliero Masi was just a private builder in Milan with a monster reputation that was justified. The shop in California was an effort by someone else to cash in. Unfortunately Masi signed a contract granting perpetual rights to the name in NAm. It, ah, didn't quite work out the way either party expected but they did make a lot of awesome bikes.
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Old 07-31-15, 11:19 PM
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Oh my gosh! Wow! Thank you to EVERYONE for ALL of the replies! I just logged on to check and see if there were any replies from my post yesterday, and...wow!

I am going to read them all, and will post another reply as soon as I can (so much going on!) :-)

Thank you all again! I look forward to learning from everyone who posted!
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Old 07-31-15, 11:40 PM
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Originally Posted by gugie View Post
I'm in the Portland, OR area, you can't throw a stick without hitting a bike shop that would satisfy your needs.

Welcome....and please,no stick throwing.
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Old 08-01-15, 12:32 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by iab View Post
- Bikes Direct.

Please forgive me.


...it will take some time. You should start by sending me flowers.
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Old 08-01-15, 01:49 AM
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Thank you again to everyone who commented and shared their knowledge! I appreciate it so much, and I have spent a good bit of time going over each comment and checking out the links provided since my last short reply here. You all know so much!

In response to a few questions that popped up:

1) LOCATION: I am located in Florida, with Orlando or Jacksonville being the nearest large cities.

2) PRICE RANGE: I am pretty open in regards to the price, simply because I want to know EVERYTHING that is out there, and then go from there. That said, I appreciate a great deal if one can be had, as long as the bike is just as good as a more expensive counterpart. So finding a vintage steal and fixing it up seems just as cool as getting a really great new one that is worth more. For the right bike, I suppose it all depends. :-)

3) TERRAIN: Florida. We are flat here. :-) HOWEVER, that said, I do live close to the ocean, and may take the bike to ride close to it. Rust is something to consider.

4) USE: Fun! I will mostly be using it just for fun (maybe I am a little nuts, but I want a vintage bike to use for fun), and maybe a little bit of taking it a local store (only because it is so close to me!) But my immediate area is not really conducive to using a bike for shopping or commuting, simply because we have such wide open spaces and everything is so spread out. But who knows - if I get really into it, I might venture out and use it for more shopping trips.

5) VINTAGE VS MODERN: I am open to either the genuine vintage bike or a modern one that looks vintage. Whichever is best for me in the end.

That said, here is a little more information that might help:

I absolutely LOVE the ride on the Electra Amsterdam. I rode their two other lines that are supposed to be a little more vintage-y, but none of them gave me that BOLT upright position that I just LOVE. The salesman told me that if I like that position, the Amsterdam is the only one by Electra that will get me that upright.

I am addicted to it. Not only do I feel it is good for my back, but I just feel so confident and relaxed and in control in that position. I had a specialized bike before, nothing with a vintage look, and I always had to lean over a lot, which I got sick of. The pressure on the hands, the constant stretching forward - I just wanted to chill and ENJOY the ride, with relaxed arms and hands, while still being able to go fast if I want to (I do like to go fast, then slow, then medium...just enjoy the range of choices).

I also like to be able to wear my normal clothing, even a long skirt or whatnot if I like, so something to prevent my clothing from getting caught or splashed, etc. is important.

I do not have a picture of exactly what I am looking for, but I did see the Pashley Princess, and that looks lovely. The Amsterdam by Electra looks cool too, but there is something about it that still says modern to me. Is Electra any good?

I think that is about what I have for now. :-) Any feedback would be awesome! Thank you all again!

Last edited by Elizabeth21; 08-01-15 at 01:53 AM.
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Old 08-01-15, 01:55 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet View Post
Is this the "Look" you seek?

It is close, thank you! The bars seem like the bike would give you that bolt upright position that I like. What bike is that?
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Old 08-01-15, 02:12 AM
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A major consideration...

What type of riding are you planning on doing?

The advantage of modern bikes is that they are very user friendly.

Classic "10 speed racing" bikes from the 1970-1974 were equipped with fussy, components that required a lot of regular maintenance.

The happy medium were bikes from the 1980s - 1990's or so. They had frames and wheel that provided a sporting ride with components such as index shifting that were easy to use.

I put this collection of pictures together to show some 1970's era mixte framed bikes. They offered step through convenience with a more sporting ride than was offered by many clunky "girls" bikes from that period.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/282672...7624757110832/

A 25 Lb. bike is a lot more exciting to ride than a 40 Lb. clunker... but again, it depends on what type of riding you want to do... commuting, going to the market, 5 mile rides around the neighborhood or longer club rides with a group of like minded cyclists.

Is it flat or hilly where you live.

Other important issues, find a bike that fits you and most importantly get a woman's seat that is comfortable for YOU to ride.

Big cushy couches are comfortable for a few miles but after a while they become uncomfortable because you sink in and they cause pressure in places you don't want to have happen.


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Old 08-01-15, 05:23 AM
  #25  
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This one's in Fernandina, a vintage Schwinn World Tourist. $45image 1 of 8<>
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