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DIY bag making

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DIY bag making

Old 06-11-16, 10:52 PM
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This handlebar bag was made for me by David at treetopbags based on his standard rando bag. The size and mounting system was changed, along with some other small details, to my specifications. He did an excellent job and I highly recommend him to anyone looking for custom bicycle bags. I will definitely get a matching saddle bag and maybe panniers in the future.





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Old 06-23-16, 04:44 AM
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wow that looks great . I wonder what is used for the cream binding . I`m in the process of making a rear box bike bag , like the tartan raleigh ones from the 60`s . I`m using sadel coloured leatherette, stiffened with plastic campain corrigated board and lined with a flowery waterproof fabric . Its been a right pain to sew, but I have it finished and if anyone is interested I`ll post a pic . Just have to add a closure for the lid and decide how I`ll fix it to the back panniers
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Old 06-23-16, 06:01 AM
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just bought some materials for my next project, first using xpac. pics to come.
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Old 06-30-16, 01:39 PM
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made another basket bag since my wife wants a front basket on her bike now. rolltop porteur-style with waterproof ripstop liner





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Old 07-04-16, 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by aquateen
made another basket bag since my wife wants a front basket on her bike now. rolltop porteur-style with waterproof ripstop liner

looks great aquateen. waht did you use for the lining and is it waterproof ?
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Old 07-04-16, 07:29 AM
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Thanks. I used nylon ripstop. I didn't waterproof the seams but it would take a lot of water to get through this bag.
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Old 07-04-16, 09:42 AM
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Not quite as fancy as some others in this thread, but here is an idea I got from some where else...probably here! It's an Israeli gas mask bag, circa WWII, picked up on ebay for about $10 and lightly modified to strap to the seat.





P.S. Original seat has since been swapped out for a Brooks.


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Old 07-05-16, 08:01 PM
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Tool roll Tuesday





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Old 07-12-16, 02:26 PM
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plugging along on this new handlebar bag. i swear this is the last time i try making one of these...
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Old 07-16-16, 11:31 AM
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done!





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Old 07-16-16, 01:40 PM
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That looks great, aquateen. What's your source for X-pac fabric? Thinking of making a bag that combines waxed cotton with x-pac.



Originally Posted by aquateen
done!

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Old 07-16-16, 01:48 PM
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Thanks. I got my xpac online from rockywoods
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Old 07-16-16, 03:55 PM
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I make a lot of my own stuff, and finding the fabric to do it is always expensive, particularly when there is a learning curve.

Pro-Tuff Outdoor Solid Fabric, Black - Walmart.com

This stuff is available at walmart, and in several colors other than black. I bought a roll to make slip covers for my work van, and they are holding up really well.
Also made this out of it, its not ultra light fabric but lighter than cordura, and pretty tough.
[IMG][/IMG]
[IMG][/IMG]
[IMG][/IMG]
Ive made some frame bags out of it, and its about like cordura, but at under six bucks a yard.
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Old 07-16-16, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by aquateen
done!

Wow, that looks great! Where do you get the metal hardware that the mini bungie loops around? Do you need a special die for the grommets?
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Old 07-17-16, 07:41 AM
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What an amazing display of skill and patience all of you! I am so very impressed and rather humbled. Just have to say!
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Old 07-17-16, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by nazcalines
Wow, that looks great! Where do you get the metal hardware that the mini bungie loops around? Do you need a special die for the grommets?
thanks!

the hardware i used are called gaiter hooks. pretty sure this is exactly what swift industries uses

fasteners-metal

bungies are 1/8" shock cord

narrow roll goods


and the grommets i believe i got in a little kit at joann's. it comes with a special die and you just use a hammer to install. real easy.
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Old 07-17-16, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Lenton58
What an amazing display of skill and patience all of you! I am so very impressed and rather humbled. Just have to say!
I'm with you, O.

The stuff shown here is just impressive as heck.
The bags,
That backpack.

Great stuff, you guys.
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Old 07-17-16, 02:45 PM
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This is amazing.

Were you working from patterns & plans? Kit?

Or just make that up?
It's impressive.


Originally Posted by shipwreck
[IMG][/IMG]

[IMG][/IMG]
Ive made some frame bags out of it, and its about like cordura, but at under six bucks a yard.
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Old 07-17-16, 03:08 PM
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Its a modified version of Gossamer Gears G4 pack. You can get the pattern on the net for free. Made my first one some years ago, and have modified it to fit me a bit better, and to hold more weight(water), and to have some extra outside compression pockets. This pack comes in a 18oz, very heavy for a light pack but the material is much stronger than Nysil. Ive made some that were 11oz! Thats my ultra light backpacking rig in water rich areas.
Its cool because the waist and shoulder straps have a velcro opening, you can stuff socks and gloves in them for padding. A Zrest pad is the frame. A bit sweaty with a heavy load but with a light on its very comfortable.
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Old 08-22-16, 09:49 PM
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my bike box bag , still needs a closure . It is screwed to the rack







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Old 08-25-16, 01:50 PM
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Arent you afraid someone will steal them? I have a regular bag coming or id try making a tool roll!
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Old 08-25-16, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Velocivixen
Could someone tell me what type of sewing machine you're using? Just a good quality traditional machine or something specifically for heavy duty sewing?
Originally Posted by nashvillebill
A traditional old Singer will work for denim or medium ballistic nylon, and perhaps it could do a simple two-layer seam in very light leather. For heavier leather or multiple layers of thick material, a heavier duty machine will work better. Note, old industrial sewing machines usually aren't good for this--though they are sturdier, they operate at blinding machine speeds, typically with an on/off clutch that requires considerable skill to master. A slower sailmaker's machine or leather-purposed machine is better if you want to sew thick materials. (Although you can slow down the old industrial machines with a modern variable speed motor, that cuts back on the power available, which sorta defeats the purpose)

Note that the 600 series Singer and newer (from the mid 60's on) uses some plastic components in the drive train, not as good for heavy materials as the old Model 66 or 15's or the 300/400/500 series. I've made several amplifier covers with medium weight vinyl on my Model 66 and 503a machines.

One key is to use the proper needle for your material--leather needles and vinyl needles have different tips than general-purpose needles. Also set your thread tension properly for the thicker seams. I've found the old machines often have their thread tension mechanisms gummed up from old solidified lubricants, so they won't work properly until that little mechanism is properly (thoroughly) cleaned and oiled.
I use an old singer 15-125. (Almost identical to the 15-91, but it's... green... and updated?) It's a potted motor, no belts or chains. Runs strong. I bought some 3/16" thick leather straps to attempt to use on a bag (didn't turn out well) and the machine sewed straight through it. No problems whatsoever. (Disclaimer: You you coax ANY domestic machine to sew through leather... it's the longevity that becomes the problem.) That's like belt thickness leather. I got it for ~$60 at a pawn shop. It's a straight stitch only machine, but it has one of my FAVORITE accessories ever. I have the buttonholer attachment. It basically attaches to the foot and needle and sews PERFECTLY IDENTICAL buttonholes every time. Unlike the modern 4 or 5 step buttonhole, these buttonholes are virtually indistinguishable. Plus, the way it works is just so cool. Anyway, rant over. I made a frame bag at one point, was surprised I didn't post it to this thread.

My machine is identical to this except not NEARLY as nice.


Oh and my singer 5050c doesn't like to sew through that leather.

The problem I run into when sewing thick things isn't that the machine can't sew through it, it's more that I can't fit the material under the foot!

If you are going to be sewing thick leather consistantly, you really need an industrial machine with an external motor. Compare the motors from a 15-91 (often considered an "industrial" machine) to an actual industrial.. external, motor.



From this page. The Vintage Singer Sewing Machine Blog: The Difference Between Domestic & Industrial Sewing Machines (or, How Not to Get Swindled on eBay & Craigslist)

Last edited by corrado33; 08-25-16 at 04:23 PM.
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Old 08-25-16, 03:31 PM
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Here's three pictures from my first ever frame bag. Bad finishing (interfacing is still visible) but the bag still works and is in use today. Duck cloth on the outside makes it pretty much waterproof (enough.) I've ridden it in pouring rain and it was still dry inside. The bag screws to both bottle mounts using a piece of aluminum on the inside, that's why there's no straps near the crank or on the seat tube.



Lined it with wool because.... it's what I had.



Zipper side.



Also... anyone know how to join zippers at right angles? (With both the zipper pulls meeting at the corner in the "closed" position?) I didn't know how so it's kinda a mess at the corner... I sorta just threw a bunch of epoxy on it to prevent the zippers from coming off and forgot about it...

EDIT: For the record, if you want to create a full frame bag like I did. Take quite a bit off from the measurements of your frame. I made the bag to fit EXACTLY in the frame, then I took a half inch off all the way around and an inch off in the front and it was still almost too big for the frame. I think I went for 2 inches wide.

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Old 08-25-16, 08:36 PM
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Originally Posted by corrado33
I use an old singer 15-125. (Almost identical to the 15-91, but it's... green... and updated?) It's a potted motor, no belts or chains. Runs strong. I bought some 3/16" thick leather straps to attempt to use on a bag (didn't turn out well) and the machine sewed straight through it. No problems whatsoever. (Disclaimer: You you coax ANY domestic machine to sew through leather... it's the longevity that becomes the problem.) That's like belt thickness leather. I got it for ~$60 at a pawn shop. It's a straight stitch only machine, but it has one of my FAVORITE accessories ever. I have the buttonholer attachment. It basically attaches to the foot and needle and sews PERFECTLY IDENTICAL buttonholes every time. Unlike the modern 4 or 5 step buttonhole, these buttonholes are virtually indistinguishable. Plus, the way it works is just so cool. Anyway, rant over. I made a frame bag at one point, was surprised I didn't post it to this thread.

My machine is identical to this except not NEARLY as nice.


Oh and my singer 5050c doesn't like to sew through that leather.

The problem I run into when sewing thick things isn't that the machine can't sew through it, it's more that I can't fit the material under the foot!

If you are going to be sewing thick leather consistantly, you really need an industrial machine with an external motor. Compare the motors from a 15-91 (often considered an "industrial" machine) to an actual industrial.. external, motor.



From this page. The Vintage Singer Sewing Machine Blog: The Difference Between Domestic & Industrial Sewing Machines (or, How Not to Get Swindled on eBay & Craigslist)
I had an industrial Singer with the giant motor like the picture. This type of motor runs really, really fast, and the "pedal" just kicks a clutch in or out (the motor is always running). At roughly 3600 stitches per minute if my memory is correct. Great for an experienced garment worker who is getting paid per unit of clothes, terrible for us "amateurs". However, if you look carefully there are some industrial machines with the heavy motor which are geared down slower for making sails or leatherwork. But the run-of-the-mill industrial sewing machine is usually high speed.
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Old 08-25-16, 09:36 PM
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I love the pics of the old machines!! I did have a 1900s Singer Treadle but i gave it away. I have a 1950s Imperial that was my grandmas.
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