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Peugeot UO-8: Adding 700c Freehub Wheel

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Peugeot UO-8: Adding 700c Freehub Wheel

Old 10-19-15, 03:07 AM
  #1  
aquis
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Peugeot UO-8: Adding 700c Freehub Wheel

Hi Folks,
Recently bought a Peugeot UO-8, (which I believe is older than I am by a fair margin), off of craigslist. Love this bike!
I discovered the forums here shortly after and have since been obsessed with absorbing info / planning to upgrade my bike. Started a little gig as a delivery boy in Seattle, WA and I am using the bike regularly to charge up and down hills and speed across town.


I want to upgrade this bike- particularly the wheels. It has squeaky old steel wheels that came stock. I've read around and decided the best choice for me is...
700c free hub wheels- maybe with an 8 speed cassette.
I believe I found an entry level wheelset with the above description:
Amazon.com : 700c Mavic Cxp22 / Shimano Hubs with Continental Tires Road Bike Wheel Set : Sports & Outdoors

I've read a bit about changing to 700c and am aware that I will need to drop my brakes down 4mm to accommodate the smaller wheels, and also stretch my rear dropout to accomodate a 130mm hub.

Finally, my question is, will going from 5-speed to 8-speed in the rear necessitate other changes?
It's currently running the stock 5-speed freewheel.
I'm planning on buying a new chain.

Will I need a new rear derailer?
It has the old simplex rear derailer with friction shifter. Will this old derailer work? Or does it depend on the gear cluster? (I am thinking of going with an 11-30T or 11-32T:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005DTWRUE/...Z9EB6EUH&psc=1)

Let me know if I should attach any more pictures.
Looking forward to hearing from you guys. I know you guys know your stuff and I'm blessed to be reading here.

Cheers,
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Old 10-19-15, 04:20 AM
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Nice bike! I did a similar move with my AO-8 and it was straightforward, but I only went to 6 cogs on the back. Everything worked just fine with both the stock derailleur and the Suntour that is now on there.

Others have more detailed knowledge, but I suspect you won't get a 32 to work with the simplex, especially with 8 cogs.

Good luck!
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Old 10-19-15, 05:50 AM
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@aquis Nice pick up! I rebuilt and upgraded two U08's so far and the one that I kept is my main commuter and gets the most miles of all my bikes because I can use it for anything. It is a great bike ONCE you do some of the upgrades that you suggested. Firstly, if I were you I would toss the plastic Simplex derailleurs and shifters and replace them with Suntour components. They are much better and more reliable. I used a Suntour VGT Luxe RD which is a long cage rear derailleur, a spare Suntour AR FD and Suntour downtube shifters (I prefer these over the stem shifters). I switched to a used alloy wheelset with Sanshin hubs and I put on a Suntour 6 cog freewheel. This was a huge improvement. I am quite sure that @markk900 is correct and the Simplex will not function properly with those larger gear clusters. I really do not see any need for more that a 6 cog freewheel and you can get a new Shimano inexpensively.

Your seatpost is jammed way down. Is this bike too large for you? Also yes take a few more photos especially of the drive side to give us a better look.

Here is a photo of my U08 commuter at work in its current incarnation. Feel free to pick my brain for ideas.


Good luck!
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Old 10-19-15, 09:39 AM
  #4  
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The UO-8 is one of the better basic bike boom 10-speeds of the 1970s. I just added a set of panniers (not pictured) to mine, which is my go-to bike for shopping, commuting, and general transportation. I did not have to spread the rear triangle very far, because I upgraded to an "ultra-spaced" 6-speed freewheel, which is only a couple of mm wider than a standard 5-speed. The best upgrades one can make to these bikes are aluminum rims and cranks -- the rest is up to you.

The one "feature" of these frames that is good for some folks and not for others is that at least the smaller frame sizes tend to run long in the top tube. As you can see from my seat post extension, my ideal frame size is 55cm C-T, but even this little 21" UO-8, which I originally bought for my 5'6" wife, is pretty long. I ended up giving my 57cm PKN-10 to our elder son, more because the top tube was too long for me than because the top tube was too high for me (although both were true). He kept the minimum-reach stem I had put on it for my own use.
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Old 10-19-15, 09:43 AM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by greg3rd48 View Post
@aquis Nice pick up! I rebuilt and upgraded two U08's so far and the one that I kept is my main commuter and gets the most miles of all my bikes because I can use it for anything. It is a great bike ONCE you do some of the upgrades that you suggested. Firstly, if I were you I would toss the plastic Simplex derailleurs and shifters and replace them with Suntour components. They are much better and more reliable. I used a Suntour VGT Luxe RD which is a long cage rear derailleur, a spare Suntour AR FD and Suntour downtube shifters (I prefer these over the stem shifters). I switched to a used alloy wheelset with Sanshin hubs and I put on a Suntour 6 cog freewheel. This was a huge improvement. I am quite sure that @markk900 is correct and the Simplex will not function properly with those larger gear clusters. I really do not see any need for more that a 6 cog freewheel and you can get a new Shimano inexpensively.

Your seatpost is jammed way down. Is this bike too large for you? Also yes take a few more photos especially of the drive side to give us a better look.

Here is a photo of my U08 commuter at work in its current incarnation. Feel free to pick my brain for ideas.


Good luck!
Nicely done, and probably not a lot of $ the way you did it.
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Old 10-19-15, 12:02 PM
  #6  
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The bike is big for you. If your leg extension is OK, then it's OK, but make sure you're not extending your ankles when you pedal. If you can't get the seat low enough for you, sell the bike.
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Old 10-19-15, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
The bike is big for you. If your leg extension is OK, then it's OK, but make sure you're not extending your ankles when you pedal. If you can't get the seat low enough for you, sell the bike.
What he said. Another clue that it is too big is that the seat clamp is backwards. Maybe it was that way when you got it, but that's a common trick people do when they feel they are reaching too far forward or when the only riding position they are used to is on an upright bike. It moves the saddle forward but possibly (probably?) overshoots the best position for your legs over the pedals for efficiency.

On your search for wheels, if you intend to do many deliveries in the rain (this is Seattle, right? where it never rains? And the terrain is flat as a pancake, I hear ) you really should have alloy rims for safety.
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Old 10-19-15, 03:16 PM
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That's a snazzy bike you have there greg!

Thank you all for the responses.
From the picture, I suppose it may look like I'm trying to shorten the bike.
I am 6'1" with long arms and legs and I believe the bike is a 60cm frame.
It's possible the frame is large but it's not as bad as it looks. The precarious settings of the seat-post and seat clamp are accidental rather than me trying to down-size the bike. I originally had the seat-post raised a ~2 inches higher than pictured but the seat-post has a tendency to slip all the way down while riding.
Maybe I'm not tightening the lock nut hard enough. I tried shimming it with some sticky tape to keep from slipping but it only lasted a few minutes.

The seat-clamp is on backwards because- I didn't know any better and put it on that way haha. Come to think of it- the my upper body does feel a bit cramped in this configuration and I find myself trying to scooch my bottom backwards behind the seat to give myself more room.
It does however ride comfortably and I'm definitely not having to extend my ankles.

Indeed, riding down steep hills in the Seattle rain on these old steel wheels is a bear and can only be exciting for the wrong reasons. That's why I want to upgrade the wheels and I figured put in a modern cassette while I'm at it. I'm just not sure what else this will entail. While I'd like to keep as many of the old components as possible, it seems like if I upgrade to an eight cog with the 32T, I'll need to get a modern rear derailer as well. Maybe I can keep the friction shifter.
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Old 10-19-15, 03:27 PM
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I think alloy wheels are the way to go on an old UO-8. The shifters may have to go as well but there's no way of telling for certain until you put the new wheel and RD back there and see what happens.

You may find the job a bit easier (and perhaps not as expensive) if you go with these wheels, Sun CR18 Road Bike Sealed Bearing 700c Wheelset 126mm Rear [072774744381] - $120.00 Velomine.com : Worldwide Bicycle Shop, fixed gear track bike wheelsets campagnolo super record vintage bike

They're at 126 mm so you won't need to cold set the drop outs quite as far. You will need rim tape, tires, and a freewheel, however. The Sun CR 18 is a tough rim; good choice for an urban delivery bike. Plus you can get a lot better tire (and I do mean a lot better) than comes stock on that Amazon wheelset. I have no idea about the quality of the build on that amazon wheelset but I do know that the machine built wheelset I picked up from velomine was pretty good.

Where you may end up saving money is besides ending up with tires better suited for your needs (700 x 32c tires with reasonable puncture protection would be heck of a lot better than 23c ultrasports) is that you should be able to use the existing RD and shifters.

I can't tell from the pic (you should take a picture from the drive side) but it looks like someone has upgraded the crank (it is cotterless) and looks like someone has swapped out the rear derailleur. Is that a suntour RD? I can't tell but it may be a very serviceable RD.

Last edited by bikemig; 10-19-15 at 03:34 PM.
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Old 10-19-15, 03:40 PM
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On the seat slipping issue, check that you still have the shim that was used on the original post, or that if replaced the post is the right size. Don't just tighten the seat clamp harder until you check!
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Old 10-19-15, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
I think alloy wheels are the way to go on an old UO-8. The shifters may have to go as well but there's no way of telling for certain until you put the new wheel and RD back there and see what happens.

You may find the job a bit easier (and perhaps not as expensive) if you go with these wheels, Sun CR18 Road Bike Sealed Bearing 700c Wheelset 126mm Rear [072774744381] - $120.00 Velomine.com : Worldwide Bicycle Shop, fixed gear track bike wheelsets campagnolo super record vintage bike

They're at 126 mm so you won't need to cold set the drop outs quite as far. You will need rim tape, tires, and a freewheel, however. The Sun CR 18 is a tough rim; good choice for an urban delivery bike. Plus you can get a lot better tire (and I do mean a lot better) than comes stock on that Amazon wheelset. I have no idea about the quality of the build on that amazon wheelset but I do know that the machine built wheelset I picked up from velomine was pretty good.

Where you may end up saving money is besides ending up with tires better suited for your needs (700 x 32c tires with reasonable puncture protection would be heck of a lot better than 23c ultrasports) is that you should be able to use the existing RD and shifters.

I can't tell from the pic (you should take a picture from the drive side) but it looks like someone has upgraded the crank (it is cotterless) and looks like someone has swapped out the rear derailleur. Is that a suntour RD? I can't tell but it may be a very serviceable RD.
You can also get these same rims in a 27" size, Shimano hubs. My wife's old Peugeot U08 now has a set of Sun CR-18 alloy wheels in the 27" size. The advantage is, no need to adjust the brakes. And, 9 speed 11 - 30 cassette. We got rid of the stem shifters in favor of an indexed thumb shifter. http://www.amazon.com/SunRace-138SLM.../dp/B00EHK2E3U
And a used Shimano Tiagra rear derailleur. It all works together really well.

Last edited by MRT2; 10-19-15 at 04:38 PM.
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Old 10-19-15, 04:46 PM
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Originally Posted by aquis View Post
Hi Folks,
Recently bought a Peugeot UO-8, (which I believe is older than I am by a fair margin), off of craigslist. Love this bike!
I discovered the forums here shortly after and have since been obsessed with absorbing info / planning to upgrade my bike. Started a little gig as a delivery boy in Seattle, WA and I am using the bike regularly to charge up and down hills and speed across town.


I want to upgrade this bike- particularly the wheels. It has squeaky old steel wheels that came stock. I've read around and decided the best choice for me is...
700c free hub wheels- maybe with an 8 speed cassette.
I believe I found an entry level wheelset with the above description:
Amazon.com : 700c Mavic Cxp22 / Shimano Hubs with Continental Tires Road Bike Wheel Set : Sports & Outdoors

I've read a bit about changing to 700c and am aware that I will need to drop my brakes down 4mm to accommodate the smaller wheels, and also stretch my rear dropout to accomodate a 130mm hub.

Finally, my question is, will going from 5-speed to 8-speed in the rear necessitate other changes?
It's currently running the stock 5-speed freewheel.
I'm planning on buying a new chain.

Will I need a new rear derailer?
It has the old simplex rear derailer with friction shifter. Will this old derailer work? Or does it depend on the gear cluster? (I am thinking of going with an 11-30T or 11-32T:
Amazon.com : Shimano HG51 8-Speed Cassette (11-28T) : Bike Cassettes And Freewheels : Sports & Outdoors)

Let me know if I should attach any more pictures.
Looking forward to hearing from you guys. I know you guys know your stuff and I'm blessed to be reading here.

Cheers,
You can get modern 27" wheels, so no need to risk switching sizes. With the assistance of a LBS, we turned a vintage Peugeot UO8 into a modern, 1 x 9 speed city bike. And there actually are a decent selection of tires in 27 x 1 1/4. We are currently running Vittoria tires on the bike, but we have also used Panaracer Pasela. Just a quick google search suggests you can get 27" tires from Continental, Schwalbe, and Kenda.
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Old 10-20-15, 03:58 AM
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I did a build from 57-sized (presumably) 27" (ISO 630mm) wheeled Peugeot to 700c (ISO 622mm) wheel size a while back. Bike arrived without it's original wheelset, so I'm not 100% certain here. I'm 180cm and the bike seems to be a correct size for me. While fiddling with fit, I ended up with 17cm reach from stem bolt to hood tips.

For your reference, there's a full parts list (in http://www.bikeforums.net/commuting/...l#post18064411 thread post) and here's some lessons learned after ~1500km:
-Simplex S001 RD can just barely shift to 30T, but the clearance between derailleur cage and spokes was somewhat scary in the easiest gear. Given that the derailleur body is made from bendy plastic, I upgraded to Sram X-9.
-Original Simplex friction shifter levers are still in use. What I've found out when mixing old & new is that the part where the cable wraps around the shifter lever is about 16mm in diameter. This is enough for 7 speeds with Sram 1:1 cable pull ratio so I'm in search of a "bigger" shifter. They just usually don't list these parts by diameter...
-My pug's original brakes (CLB calipers, you seem to have centerpulls of some type) have reach of 55 to 75mm. Enough clearance for fenders, but flimsy. To replace these, I ordered a set of Tektro R559's.
-Rear hub spacing of the frame is 126mm and Shimano R501-wheelset's rear hub is 130mm. I haven't cold set the frame, as it requires just 2mm of bending per side while installing to get the wheel to fit. Wheelset is supposed to be 8-to-10s compatible, I'm running 8-speed cassette.
-Overall, my Peugeot's ride quality is surprisingly good even it's just entry-level carbolite 103 tubeset. I'm comparing against modern alu-carbon Merida CX bike and vintage Bianchi specialissima here.
-Geometry downsides are small toe overlap and I've managed to scrub pedal cages to the ground occasionally. High speed cornering while pedaling...



I also replaced the notorious AVA-branded stem because it snapped.

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Old 10-20-15, 05:10 AM
  #14  
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A UO10 I picked up this last Sunday. It's a 60, and I am also 6'1" with average arms and legs but long torso. If you have long legs and are the same height, your saddle should be higher than two inches above where it is now. (Just my humble opinion of course) No pun intended, haha. Model name on this UO10 is "Course" hehe. The saddle on my bike is set about right for my leg length, so you can see what I mean. I am excited to get this one rolling. A little polish, grease, cables, and tires, and I'm on the road.,,,,BD


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Old 10-20-15, 05:31 AM
  #15  
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For the sake of simplicity and saving money I'd just find an old 27" alloy wheel set. You can probably find a good used set for next to nothing and it would be a big upgrade over those steel rims.

Back in the bad old days it was business as usual to swap the simplex out for a suntour, again cheap as chips. When I lived in Seattle you could find stuff like this in the junk bins at Recycled Cycles, that was a few years ago but I'd bet it's still common stuff.
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