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Early 90's Campagnolo

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Early 90's Campagnolo

Old 01-12-16, 10:58 AM
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Mr.Peloton
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Early 90's Campagnolo

I am looking at buying an Italian frame from the 90's and am looking for Campagnolo parts to go on it. I really want parts from the era, preferably 7 speed. I am looking for either late 80's or early 90's top of the line components from Campagnolo, but have had no luck finding them. I just want to know what to look for and if I can get all the components including the wheelset for less than $900.
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Old 01-12-16, 11:03 AM
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Depending on the component level and condition you're looking for, you should have no trouble finding something in your price range. You should be able to get a complete bike for that if you're patient. That's always cheaper than building one up from scratch.

Have you searched the "build kits and gruppos" section on eBay?

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Old 01-12-16, 12:02 PM
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Do you actually plan to ride it?

Campagnolo's 7-sp was, let's say, crappy.

For early 90's, you're better off with 8sp or 9sp Ergo, but selection is limited, as well as variabiliy in "percieved condition." Then, you may have to get the shifters serviced with new springs, etc. You're still going to have to by a chain, cables, housing, tires and wheels, etc.

For the price and longevity, you're better off with silver 11sp Athena and a set of Khamsin wheels.

Groupset, to incl chain and cables/housing: 483.27, wheels 120.78, headset 47.67, Cinelli 64's 41.81, Cinelli 1A stem 47.18 (Amazon), Deda RS01 polished seatpost 19.28, Selle Italia Turbo 29.83, 2 Continenal Race tubes 7.06, 2 Vittoria Rubino Pro 3's 39.76. Arundel Gecko wrap 14.49.....$851.13 new.

Or, go with silver 10sp Veloce, group inclusive: 362.44, wheels 120.78, headset 47.67, Cinelli 64's 41.81, Cinelli 1A stem 47.18 (Amazon), Deda RS01 polished seatpost 19.28, Selle Italia Turbo 29.83, 2 Continenal Race tubes 7.06, 2 Vittoria Rubino Pro 3's 39.76. Arundel Gecko wrap 14.49.....730.30 new.

Less whatever is already in your parts bin, whatever comes with the frameset, etc. In any case, easy build, all new stuff, will outlast you. Oh, yeah, prices just pulled from ribble....
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Old 01-12-16, 12:07 PM
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I plan to ride it, if the frame has 128mm spacing then would it be able to fit an 8-sp?
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Old 01-12-16, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr.Peloton View Post
I plan to ride it, if the frame has 128mm spacing then would it be able to fit an 8-sp?
No problem. 8 speed is spaced at 130mm, so that's only an extra 1mm per side. You won't even need to cold set it.
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Old 01-12-16, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by icepick_trotsky View Post
No problem. 8 speed is spaced at 130mm, so that's only an extra 1mm per side. You won't even need to cold set it.
Thank you so much, now the struggle of finding an 8-sp group.
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Old 01-12-16, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr.Peloton View Post
Thank you so much, now the struggle of finding an 8-sp group.
As Robbie said it will be struggle to piece it together. If the thrill of the hunt and a drawn out build is what you want then go for it. If you want to have a bike that is lighter and more run to ride. Get a new group online as per Mr.Tune's suggestion. Again, it is all fully compatible with your frame.
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Old 01-12-16, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr.Peloton View Post
Thank you so much, now the struggle of finding an 8-sp group.
This plus some wheels and you're rolling. You can probably find something cheaper with some patience, though.

Vintage 1993 94 Campagnolo Athena 8 Speed Group Set | eBay
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Old 01-12-16, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by cyclotoine View Post
As Robbie said it will be struggle to piece it together. If the thrill of the hunt and a drawn out build is what you want then go for it. If you want to have a bike that is lighter and more run to ride. Get a new group online as per Mr.Tune's suggestion. Again, it is all fully compatible with your frame.
I understand what you guys are saying, but I love the feel of the old 7, 8, and even 9 speed groupsets. I myself have a Campagnolo Chorus 7-sp ergo on my Team Miyata, and absolutely love the feel. I like it a lot better than my aluminum Cannondale Synapse in fact. I have decided to sell 2 or 3 of my bikes and get one to take their place, and that bike is my current project. The most I am willing to go for in terms of gears is a 2x9.
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Old 01-12-16, 02:21 PM
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8 speed Campagnolo Ergopower is nice stuff. It's very solid and reliable, and not too hard to rebuild when it wears out. Parts and hoods are still available.

But: the ergonomics aren't great, even though it's named "Ergo". The lever shape is made to mimic the old brake-only levers, and they still have a point on the top like old non-aero brake levers.
@Mr.Peloton, since you're using 7 speed Campy then the shape of the 8 speed Ergo levers should actually feel right at home.

For the rest of us, when compared to the shape of more modern integrated shifters, 8 speed Campy Ergopower stuff won't feel comfortable. You can't really grip up on the hoods like you can on modern STI/Ergos. But, the grip on the shifter body itself fits pretty well.
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Old 01-12-16, 07:56 PM
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Should I get ergo shifters or the old index shifters for the 8-sp?
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Old 01-13-16, 03:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr.Peloton View Post
Should I get ergo shifters or the old index shifters for the 8-sp?
Have no experience with campag index shifters but thought they hadn't got it quite right early on? (Chime in experienced users here). I do have a mid level 90's first gen ergo 8sp ride and are contemplating a complete long haul restore so am interested in this thread. In answer to your question, I'll ask do you want a bike from that period to fill a gap and aren't concerned so much about function or do you want a period bike with the foundations and functionality of a more modern bike?
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Old 01-13-16, 06:41 AM
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I want a bike from the 90's with period correct parts, and I would like it to ride like it was made in the 90's.
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Old 01-13-16, 06:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr.Peloton View Post
I want a bike from the 90's with period correct parts, and I would like it to ride like it was made in the 90's.
Then by all means, go for it. I re-did an '81 Centurion Semi-Pro with 8-sp Athena, Eurus wheels, and did the same to a 1985 Cinelli Equipe Centurion. Both came out quite well. The only thing the owners now have to think about is shifter maintenance over time.
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Old 01-13-16, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr.Peloton View Post
I want a bike from the 90's with period correct parts, and I would like it to ride like it was made in the 90's.
You have a choice then of ergo or index if you're going for early 90s. Late 80s would be index
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Old 01-13-16, 08:20 AM
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I think you should be able to meet your initial goal. An example is a Pinarello Montello from 1991 picked off CL for less than $500 in the spring of 2014. The only discrepancy from your requirement is that it is all DA 8spd (DT shifters), but the headset (Chorus). I was not going to look a gift horse in the mouth and purchased it right away.

My plan was to replace the Shimano group with Campy as a Pinarello should have. After doing some research, A BF member mentioned that Pinarello gave into customer demand, in that time frame, for equipping its frames with Shimano. The perception, and others will back this up, was that the new 7400 DA was superior to the available Campy choices.

With nearly 2000 miles on the bike this last year, I have to say that this group set is a dream to ride. I am nearly won over. The only reason I am not is that I don't have anything to compare it to in my stable except older friction shift components.

Before I convert to Campy, I need to have some confidence that what is going on that frame is at least as good or better. Since I am snobbish, I would prefer Record but the $'s prevent such a move with the lack of assurance of the ROI. Even a straight trade would cause me to hesitate. I don't like losing something that has value to me.

OK my point is, consider options to your requirements. You should be able to find, in time, a nice bike meeting your riding requirements and possibly your equipment ones as well.
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Old 01-13-16, 09:29 AM
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Personally I would stay away from Campy Indexed. Go Ergo.
I had Chorus 8 spd gruppo on my Serotta and if functioned flawlessly.
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Old 01-13-16, 09:40 AM
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I am not looking at upgrading my bike's components. I am planning on buying a frame, and building everything onto it. The build will probably be way more $'s than it's actually worth, but I don't care because I will most likely have this bike for many years and enjoy it for every single one of them. Since I am still in my teenage years, I am having to save up a ton for this bike and I want everything to be perfect. My bike that got me started on cycling was a Trek Elance, it is currently sitting in the garage since it is too small for me and my sister doesn't want to use it. Normally I wouldn't even consider putting on friction shifters and go straight to ergo shifters, but I learned how to ride on friction shifters and loved them. I currently don't have a bike that has them on and I have been planning on building a bike with them for a while. I am not 100% sure if I really want to have friction shifters, but I really want to learn your opinions on which you like better from the people who grew up with friction shifters and ergo shifters.

So it's either put the friction shifts on this bike, or put them on a different bike later on.

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Old 01-13-16, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Vintage Raleigh View Post
Have no experience with campag index shifters but thought they hadn't got it quite right early on? (Chime in experienced users here).
Here's one data point: The indexing on the 7-speed (Croce d'Aune group) bike I have is exceedingly vague, the worst I've ever used. I can live with it, because "Cool! Croce d'Aune!" and most of my bikes are still friction shifting anyway, but it's almost comical how bad it is.
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Old 01-13-16, 06:26 PM
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If you want everything to be perfect, and you want to enjoy it for many years, you may want to get some springs with those Ergo shifters, and learn to rebuild them yourself. It's satisfying, works well, and is not rocket science. The main thing you'll also need to get is some 8-speed cassettes. Chains will be around, springs, etc, but good 8-sp cassettes are already scarce or expensive, unless you go with a Miche or something aftermarket.

However, you can get a Wheels Mfg 8-sp cassette spacer kit and run Shimano cassettes on Shimano/SRAM 8/9/10 rear hubs, spaced for your Campy. This would allow you greater flexibility. You can stay "in period" with something like a Mavic wheelset.

If I was locked into the components/era you're after, continue to save money, and start trolling eBay and some other sites. A set of Campy Eurus wheels, or Shamal or Vento's, in 8-sp, are great choices, and the Shamal or Ventos are timeless classics. A 90's Italian frame running 8-sp Athena to Record, on Vento HP-16's, well, that's classic.

Originally Posted by Mr.Peloton View Post
I am not looking at upgrading my bike's components. I am planning on buying a frame, and building everything onto it. The build will probably be way more $'s than it's actually worth, but I don't care because I will most likely have this bike for many years and enjoy it for every single one of them. Since I am still in my teenage years, I am having to save up a ton for this bike and I want everything to be perfect. My bike that got me started on cycling was a Trek Elance, it is currently sitting in the garage since it is too small for me and my sister doesn't want to use it. Normally I wouldn't even consider putting on friction shifters and go straight to ergo shifters, but I learned how to ride on friction shifters and loved them. I currently don't have a bike that has them on and I have been planning on building a bike with them for a while. I am not 100% sure if I really want to have friction shifters, but I really want to learn your opinions on which you like better from the people who grew up with friction shifters and ergo shifters.

So it's either put the friction shifts on this bike, or put them on a different bike later on.
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Old 01-13-16, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
If you want everything to be perfect, and you want to enjoy it for many years, you may want to get some springs with those Ergo shifters, and learn to rebuild them yourself. It's satisfying, works well, and is not rocket science. The main thing you'll also need to get is some 8-speed cassettes. Chains will be around, springs, etc, but good 8-sp cassettes are already scarce or expensive, unless you go with a Miche or something aftermarket.

However, you can get a Wheels Mfg 8-sp cassette spacer kit and run Shimano cassettes on Shimano/SRAM 8/9/10 rear hubs, spaced for your Campy. This would allow you greater flexibility. You can stay "in period" with something like a Mavic wheelset.

If I was locked into the components/era you're after, continue to save money, and start trolling eBay and some other sites. A set of Campy Eurus wheels, or Shamal or Vento's, in 8-sp, are great choices, and the Shamal or Ventos are timeless classics. A 90's Italian frame running 8-sp Athena to Record, on Vento HP-16's, well, that's classic.
I certainly must have an 8 speed Record/Campy something rimmed wheelset or three around here.

Probably have stems, seatposts, saddles etc. as well........

Maybe an extra groupset as well if I don't build the Tommasini Sintesi.

Gotta talk to CM first and see what his schedule looks like.
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Old 01-13-16, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr.Peloton View Post
I am not looking at upgrading my bike's components. I am planning on buying a frame, and building everything onto it. The build will probably be way more $'s than it's actually worth, but I don't care because I will most likely have this bike for many years and enjoy it for every single one of them. Since I am still in my teenage years, I am having to save up a ton for this bike and I want everything to be perfect. My bike that got me started on cycling was a Trek Elance, it is currently sitting in the garage since it is too small for me and my sister doesn't want to use it. Normally I wouldn't even consider putting on friction shifters and go straight to ergo shifters, but I learned how to ride on friction shifters and loved them. I currently don't have a bike that has them on and I have been planning on building a bike with them for a while. I am not 100% sure if I really want to have friction shifters, but I really want to learn your opinions on which you like better from the people who grew up with friction shifters and ergo shifters.

So it's either put the friction shifts on this bike, or put them on a different bike later on.
You're talking about 3 different types here
Campagnolo friction shifters are from an earlier period - not sure of the cut off but probably late 70s early 80s (someone here will verify)
After friction shifters Campagnolo got on board and produced down tube indexed shifters.
Then in the early 90s they produced the ergo integrated brake and gear units that we know of today.

I built my first real racing bike as a teenager the same way you're contemplating as it was too expensive to buy the bike I wanted outright. Learnt a lot along the way.
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Old 01-13-16, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Vintage Raleigh View Post
You're talking about 3 different types here
Campagnolo friction shifters are from an earlier period - not sure of the cut off but probably late 70s early 80s (someone here will verify)
After friction shifters Campagnolo got on board and produced down tube indexed shifters.
Then in the early 90s they produced the ergo integrated brake and gear units that we know of today.

I built my first real racing bike as a teenager the same way you're contemplating as it was too expensive to buy the bike I wanted outright. Learnt a lot along the way.
Since I am young, I did not know there was a difference, but I meant down tube shifters.

I have looked a lot on ebay and found a Campagnolo Chorus groupset for $700, it has down tube shifters. I also found a Campagnolo Shamal wheelset that has an 8 speed cassette (maybe) for $538. I also found a NOS Viner frame for $650 obo. I don't know if these components are worth that though, if they aren't should I wait until some come that are more reasonable?

But I am not doing this because the bike I want is too expensive, I am doing this so I can build a bike from a frame and get to learn how to put everything together. This bike is going to be basically a bike I will cherish and hold on for many years, which is why I am putting a lot money into it, so I won't have to buy the parts years down the road when they are even harder to find and way more expensive.

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Old 01-13-16, 08:01 PM
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As you probably know indexed shifters have a ratchet mechanism so they click into each gear (in theory).
Friction shifters are your basic units that don't click into place - you move the lever and the derailleur moves accordingly.
I have two bikes with down tube friction levers and gear changes can be a black art until you get used to them.
I like them because they're of that period (as with everything else on the bikes).
The idiosyncrasies are what will give your bike character with indexed downtube shifters.
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Old 01-13-16, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Vintage Raleigh View Post
As you probably know indexed shifters have a ratchet mechanism so they click into each gear (in theory).
Friction shifters are your basic units that don't click into place - you move the lever and the derailleur moves accordingly.
I have two bikes with down tube friction levers and gear changes can be a black art until you get used to them.
I like them because they're of that period (as with everything else on the bikes).
The idiosyncrasies are what will give your bike character with indexed downtube shifters.
I actually didn't know the difference, but that makes sense since the bike I grew up with had friction shifters and the bike I have now has indexed. I really appreciate you explaining the difference to me.
Mr.Peloton is offline  

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