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Dropout adjuster screws, yay or nay?

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Dropout adjuster screws, yay or nay?

Old 01-31-16, 04:29 PM
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stardognine
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Dropout adjuster screws, yay or nay?

I'm pretty sure those little doodads are useful, for some situations, but to me, they just seem to complicate things. I have far better results, when I just remove them, then the rear wheel just aligns itself, every time. Anyone else do this, or am I just a weirdo?
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Old 01-31-16, 04:30 PM
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I've never really used them. I always keep a greased bolt in the hole though, I think they are prone to breaking.
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Old 01-31-16, 04:45 PM
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Yay!!!
Tune-able chainstays.
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Old 01-31-16, 04:47 PM
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They are useful as you set the axle position relative to the upper pivot bolt of the rear deraillleur, as some RDS shift better with the right distance dialed in.
But once you set it you pretty much "forget it" but when it comes to taking the rear wheel off and back on, you will be sure that the axle is in the right place for best shifting and that your wheel will be straight between the stays.
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Old 01-31-16, 04:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Chombi View Post
They are useful as you set the axle position relative to the upper pivot bolt of the rear deraillleur, as some RDS shift better with the right distance dialed in.
But once you set it you pretty much "forget it" but when it comes to taking the rear wheel off and back on, you will be sure that the axle is in the right place for best shifting and that your wheel will be straight between the stays.
Ahh, that clarifies things. I knew that they're supposed to let you put your wheel in the same position, each time, but I didn't know exactly why. Seems it'd be better, to just avoid certain trouble-causing RDs.
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Old 01-31-16, 05:09 PM
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When changing a wheel in a race, you need speed. Being able to slap the wheel in and go is very important.
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Old 01-31-16, 05:16 PM
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a nice bike is incomplete without them.
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Old 01-31-16, 05:18 PM
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+1 on the derailleur tuning. Vintage derailleurs lack the "B screw" that helps set the chain distance from the top pulley to the cog. You use the axle position in the dropout to decrease the chain gap without hitting the cog and it's set then with the dropout screw.

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Old 01-31-16, 05:48 PM
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I like using them, plus I really like the looks. A small part of why I like vintage steel frames.
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Old 01-31-16, 05:51 PM
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Although I have used bikes without them, usually lower end, I can't imagine not having them. Getting the SS running has reinforced this perspective.
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Old 01-31-16, 06:14 PM
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Love them. All my dropouts are usually a little borked, so it makes it easy to center the rear wheel.
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Old 01-31-16, 07:07 PM
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I find them useful for the tuning of the rear derailleur between using the positioning (as was stated) to the RD and using the B screw. When you use a vintage corncob FW it's important to tune the shifting.
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Old 01-31-16, 07:24 PM
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They're a good way to put correct tension on your SS or IGH chain without fussing with it every time.
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Old 01-31-16, 08:50 PM
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Adjustment screws were originally developed to compensate for unequal chainstay length. As stated, they also expedite wheel centring when changing wheels, particularly during races. Toying around with them too much can adversely affect derailleur performance, particularly with indexed systems. Consequently, most manufacturers have gone to vertical dropouts which tamperproofs one characteristic critical to optimum shifting performance.
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Old 01-31-16, 08:59 PM
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They are something else that the new generation of cyclist haven't got a clue about.
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Old 01-31-16, 09:01 PM
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I like the look of them and functionality of pulling the wheel right in place but so many times they are a little tweaked when I get a bike. But, recently, I scored this tiny hammer, about 6" long, from Grandpa's old tool stash. I've used it a number of times to gently tap the screws back to straight. I'm sure I'll find other uses but so far, it's the "Dropout Adjuster Screw Straightener." A very specific tool!
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Old 01-31-16, 09:15 PM
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The point of having a vintage pedigree is to have it completely dialed in. With-out this specific tune, there are several factors that will cause your bike to ride like a huffy aerowind.
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Old 01-31-16, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by 72Paramount View Post
The point of having a vintage pedigree is to have it completely dialed in. With-out this specific tune, there are several factors that will cause your bike to ride like a huffy aerowind.
Dont be like this bike:
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Old 01-31-16, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by coolkat View Post
Love them. All my dropouts are usually a little borked, so it makes it easy to center the rear wheel.
Nice. Haven't heard that term in a while.... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Bork#Bork_as_verb
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Old 01-31-16, 11:22 PM
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with a properly dished wheel in there, they can also show if your rear triangle is off center.
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Old 01-31-16, 11:46 PM
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
They're a good way to put correct tension on your SS or IGH chain without fussing with it every time.
+1 Another good reason for using road drops instead of track ends with fix gears and SSs.

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Old 02-01-16, 12:42 AM
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Here's one contradictory opinion about horizontal dropouts. They are the one thing that I don't like much about C&V bikes. The plentitude of Campy 1010 type dropouts on vintage bikes is something I have to fight with when trying to fit a larger tire size and fenders on a bike from the decades when horizontal dropouts were de rigueur. They masked unequal length chainstays.

What they do work well for are fixie and IGH conversions. In that case they are an advantage. The ability to adjust chain tension makes them desirable.

Back to the OP's question, if I have a bike with horizontal dropouts, I much prefer them to have adjustment screws for all the reasons others have already stated on this thread.
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Old 02-01-16, 12:59 AM
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL View Post
Dont be like this bike:
Ah, Simano Adamas AX brake calipers and drivetrain. You sure don't see that stuff very often these days.

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Old 02-01-16, 01:18 AM
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Yay
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Old 02-01-16, 06:37 AM
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Not all frames are perfectly aligned for the rear wheel to be dead center just by slamming it up into the dropouts.

Combine that with some QR's that don't always grip, and it's a nice way to stop in your tracks on an uphill climb. If often makes itself apparent much earlier than that, though.

I like being able to put the rear wheel in, back up, and adjust the dropout screws to a nice centered rear wheel.

Plus, they're shiny.
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