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Old 04-04-16, 06:49 PM   #1
84Bianchi
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70s CCM Mistral

Getting ready to list my CCM Mistral for sale, but want to narrow down the year first.

Attached are some pictures, and the frame code is E756201

Non-cottered Sugino Maxy Cranks, one Ambrosio Rim, Weinmann levers & callipers.

Any ideas? 1975?
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File Type: jpg IMG_20160402_172259.jpg (105.8 KB, 114 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20160404_200544477.jpg (98.8 KB, 102 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20160402_170901288.jpg (104.9 KB, 104 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20160402_170912363.jpg (104.0 KB, 100 views)
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Old 04-04-16, 07:44 PM   #2
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Manufactured in 1973 but but could be a 1973 or 1974 model. This model was unchanged during these two years and the only change for 1975-1976 was dropping the leather saddle in favour of a padded plastic model. It was third in a line of five adult lightweights. The frame is Reynolds 531 plain gauge, with hi-tensile forks and stays. Original price, $165 CDN in 1973.
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Old 04-04-16, 08:08 PM   #3
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Thanks T-Mar, I was hoping you would chime in, as I figured you would have the answer.
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Old 04-04-16, 08:22 PM   #4
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Yes, I built and sold a few of these but not many. Anything by CCM above a Targa was a hard sell. The teens and twenty-somethings wanted European or Japanese. If they didn't have their own money, the parents tended to buy Canadian and bottom end - which meant a CCM Targa. I actually had a 1973 Mistral myself. It was abandoned by the owner and became shop property when he hadn't picked it up by the end of the season.
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Old 04-04-16, 08:51 PM   #5
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I had one of those. My dad got it for me when I was 16 in '73. I loved that bike. I rode it every where. We didn't know what Italian bikes were in my town.
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Old 04-04-16, 09:30 PM   #6
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I lusted after a 75 CCM Mistral that occupied prime real estate in the overpriced Mr Fixit bicycle store at our local shopping plaza in western Winnipeg, but my ardour cooled as I realized how overpriced it was in relation to the foreign competition, on display in other cycle outlets around town.
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Old 10-05-17, 02:58 PM   #7
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I'm looking for a 52/40 crankset to replace the bent one on my ccm mistral (same as pictured above) can anyone point me in the right direction for one that will fit without modification? thanks in advance
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Old 10-05-17, 04:06 PM   #8
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I'm looking for a 52/40 crankset to replace the bent one on my ccm mistral (same as pictured above) can anyone point me in the right direction for one that will fit without modification? thanks in advance
If you're after the look I have an NOS SR 3 arm crank that needs a good home. Pics on request.
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Old 10-06-17, 07:18 AM   #9
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If you're after the look I have an NOS SR 3 arm crank that needs a good home. Pics on request.
An SR with a three armed spider on a swaged large chainring might be a Silver, in which case it uses the incompatible 3 degree taper.

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I'm looking for a 52/40 crankset to replace the bent one on my ccm mistral (same as pictured above) can anyone point me in the right direction for one that will fit without modification? thanks in advance.
Also, we'd need to know the length req'd. CCM supplied these in either 165mm or 171mm length, depending on the size of the frame. The length will be stamped on the back of the arms. Is the arm itself bent,or just the chainring? The latter can often be straightening quite easily. It just takes some trial and error.
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Old 10-06-17, 11:42 AM   #10
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An SR with a three armed spider on a swaged large chainring might be a Silver, in which case it uses the incompatible 3 degree taper.



Also, we'd need to know the length req'd. CCM supplied these in either 165mm or 171mm length, depending on the size of the frame. The length will be stamped on the back of the arms. Is the arm itself bent,or just the chainring? The latter can often be straightening quite easily. It just takes some trial and error.
Alright thank you very much for the swift response. I will check the back of the arms for the stamp when I get home from work. Just the chainring is bent and I'm not even sure how it happened maybe the metal is already fatigued? What is the best method and/or tools necessary to bend it back in place?
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Old 10-06-17, 05:09 PM   #11
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An SR with a three armed spider on a swaged large chainring might be a Silver, in which case it uses the incompatible 3 degree taper.
Yes, that's it exactly!! I remember seeing alot of these on entry level Sekines in Winnipeg in the mid-70s, if I'm not mistaken.
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Old 10-08-17, 09:43 PM   #12
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I true chainrings by gripping the chainring with the jaws of an adjustable wrench and bending it in or out, as req'd. It takes a bit of trial and error to determine the required force. Start at the point of biggest deflection and gradual work down to progressively smaller deflections. I use the same process on brake discs.
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Old 10-09-17, 04:37 PM   #13
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Wow... you are good!
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Old 10-09-17, 04:48 PM   #14
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Yes, that's it exactly!! I remember seeing alot of these on entry level Sekines in Winnipeg in the mid-70s, if I'm not mistaken.
Not just on entry level Sekines. I have one on my mid 70 sekine SHS 271. Weird design with a 70 mm BB to boot.
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Old 10-09-17, 07:10 PM   #15
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I true chainrings by gripping the chainring with the jaws of an adjustable wrench and bending it in or out, as req'd. It takes a bit of trial and error to determine the required force. Start at the point of biggest deflection and gradual work down to progressively smaller deflections. I use the same process on brake discs.
It turns out I've got the 171mm length. What are my options? Thanks so much
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Old 10-10-17, 05:09 AM   #16
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I think you quoted your best option. Try to straighten it out.
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Old 10-10-17, 07:48 AM   #17
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Yes, I'd try to straighten it first. It doesn't cost you anything to try, except a little time, and you may be successful. At worst, you ruin something that currently isn't usable. Let us know how things work out.

BTW, remove the inner chainring before straightening. It adds some stiffness and the task will be slightly easier without it.
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Old 10-10-17, 01:06 PM   #18
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Yes, I'd try to straighten it first. It doesn't cost you anything to try, except a little time, and you may be successful. At worst, you ruin something that currently isn't usable. Let us know how things work out.

BTW, remove the inner chainring before straightening. It adds some stiffness and the task will be slightly easier without it.
Ok great thanks for the advice and helpful tips! I'll let you know how it goes
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