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Maino 4 speed city/touring bike

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Maino 4 speed city/touring bike

Old 04-29-16, 07:47 PM
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Maino 4 speed city/touring bike

Hello all,
I just got this old Maino today. What do you think?


It has a Campagnolo Sport rear derailleur with only one jockey wheel. It has a four speed freewheel. It has a generator on the front wheel that powers the lights, though the headlight doesn't work.
Has anyone seem a bike like this?
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Old 04-29-16, 07:54 PM
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Does yours have a triple plate fork crown?
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Old 04-29-16, 08:09 PM
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I think it has a fake triple plate fork crown. So, no.
Also, I haven't weighed it yet but it's heavy. Probably around 35 pounds.
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Old 04-29-16, 08:34 PM
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It's an attempt to make it look classy!

It's got that old school Italian green thing going on. Congratulations!
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Old 04-29-16, 08:38 PM
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Is lighting system a matched set, all from the same manufacturer?

The large tail lamp - reflector combination resembles one REG used to offer.

Front hub slightly unusual in that it appears to be five-piece steel yet is hollow axle. Is there a name on the barrel? Is skewer something like a Brev Stop?

Is/was there a reflector clamped to the midpoint of the left seat stay? Appears there is a braze-on in the middle of the seat stay on the inner side. Are you able to tell what it is for?

Is rear brake cable routed through top tube?

Frame's head is Agrati "Sport" series while seat lug is Agrati "AM" series.

There are two generations of Campagnolo Sport rear mech. You may be able to bracket the dating of the bicycle by determining with which it is equipped:

VeloBase.com - Component: Campagnolo 1013/2, Sport

VeloBase.com - Component: Campagnolo 1013/3, Sport
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Old 04-29-16, 08:44 PM
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There's a wheel lock on the left seat stay.
The rear brake cable is internally routed through the top tube.
The RD looks more like your first link.
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Old 04-29-16, 09:04 PM
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Thank you for the response.

We need a visit from @iab; he will be able to tell us if the machine is a "Maino Maino" or if it represents a contract build.

As you may already be aware, there is a Maino page at CR:

Maino
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Old 04-30-16, 04:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Seizedpost View Post
I think it has a fake triple plate fork crown. So, no.
Also, I haven't weighed it yet but it's heavy. Probably around 35 pounds.
This may be a useless nit but: there on your front brake cable where it locks into the nut/bolt on the caliper is a green plastic cover. My wife has an Ideor made around 1963 and it has those covers, in red. I've not seen them on any other bikes. Folks may have used them for a narrow window? Could help with dating? Just European or just Italian bikes?? Oh, the Ideor, as you may know, was an Italian maker that (according to CR) finished in 1963.
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Old 04-30-16, 06:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Prowler View Post
This may be a useless nit but: there on your front brake cable where it locks into the nut/bolt on the caliper is a green plastic cover. My wife has an Ideor made around 1963 and it has those covers, in red. I've not seen them on any other bikes. Folks may have used them for a narrow window? Could help with dating? Just European or just Italian bikes?? Oh, the Ideor, as you may know, was an Italian maker that (according to CR) finished in 1963.
This is a fitting from REG. Offered in several colours. Bicycle's pump holder set from REG as well. It is Nr. 376 "Ortelli."
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Old 04-30-16, 10:03 AM
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Well, I dig it. It's pretty much begging for white tennis shorts and an unfiltered sigaretta...
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Old 05-01-16, 06:07 PM
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How big of a problem is this rim corrosion?

It doesn't seem to be too deep, but it's not exactly confidence inspiring. Is it a reaction with the steel spoke nipples?
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Old 05-01-16, 06:19 PM
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Looks to be a Nisi Toro and it looks to be kaput.

Corrosion is from electrolysis.

Last edited by juvela; 05-01-16 at 06:21 PM. Reason: spellin'
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Old 05-01-16, 06:31 PM
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Sweet bike. Clean the rust and it will be fine. Except the rims, those are toast. The fenders are fantastic. Also, the grips were probably bone at one time.
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Old 05-01-16, 07:12 PM
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Replace them with a modern alloy wheelset... it will shave a good pound off the bike and result in a more lively ride. Tires would need to be replaced as well.

I'd keep everything else - this vintage aspect is part of the charm.
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Old 05-01-16, 07:48 PM
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A period plausible handgrip to keep an eye out for would be the REG Nr. 348. It is injection moulded plastic made to resemble the colour of horn. Two colours were offered "pale" and "dark." There is a good possibility the machine might have been fitted with it ex-works.

Here is an Umberto Dei wearing a pair:

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Umberto Dei a) .jpg (103.1 KB, 330 views)
File Type: jpg
Umberto Dei b) .jpg (103.5 KB, 335 views)

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Old 05-02-16, 02:47 PM
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I can't just get a modern wheelset, I don't want to put a cassette on it. I could put some modern rims on nice vintage hubs.
I wonder if it's worth saving the original hubs. They're Campagnolo. They're steel and a little rusted, but they're original. The biggest problem with them is that the freehweel is stuck, but I'm trying destructive removal next.

Less importantly, I got the lights working. The taillight had a bad ground.
What do you think I should do about the chrome? The chainguard has none left. It might be beyond help on the handlebars and stem (which are one piece) and it's definitely beyond help on the brake levers. Is this bike worth re-chroming (not the frame, I think that will clean up fine), or should I just clean it up and live with some patina?
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Old 05-02-16, 02:53 PM
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IMO, live with the patina. Save the Campag hubs and use them again.
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Old 05-02-16, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Seizedpost View Post
I can't just get a modern wheelset, I don't want to put a cassette on it. I could put some modern rims on nice vintage hubs.
I wonder if it's worth saving the original hubs. They're Campagnolo. They're steel and a little rusted, but they're original. The biggest problem with them is that the freehweel is stuck, but I'm trying destructive removal next.

Less importantly, I got the lights working. The taillight had a bad ground.
What do you think I should do about the chrome? The chainguard has none left. It might be beyond help on the handlebars and stem (which are one piece) and it's definitely beyond help on the brake levers. Is this bike worth re-chroming (not the frame, I think that will clean up fine), or should I just clean it up and live with some patina?
I would do new rims on original hubs. When the hubs are delaced you can soak them in oxalic acid to remove the rust. That bike has earned its patina. Clean it up and ride it.
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Old 05-02-16, 03:01 PM
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wrt gear block removal -

if it is a notched Regina you need a removal tool with the guide ring. then cinch it down good and tight and clamp the tool in a beefy bench vise. the wheel is your removal handle. with the right tool cinched down tight nothing can slip and you will be able to generate enough torque for removal.
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Old 05-02-16, 03:01 PM
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The replacement rims, are you going to look for ones with the serrated brake surface?
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Old 05-02-16, 03:29 PM
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Here's the freewheel.

I got this bike for free because my friend, the previous owner, had given up on freewheel removal. He says he soaked it and everything.
I was leaning towards destructive freewheel removal until I saw eBay prices on 4 speed freewheels. If I can't save this one I might have to convert it to 5 speed. Dropout spacing is already 120mm. I know it would need a new derailleur. What I'm not sure about is the chainring.

I feel like this kind of freewheel would be much easier to remove if the tool had a sleeve or ridge that went down inside the freewheel body to keep it on straight.

Any suggestions?

Edit: 3Speedslow, others are suggesting modern rims, so that would mean no. If I go vintage, maybe. Do they actually help?

Last edited by Seizedpost; 05-02-16 at 03:32 PM.
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Old 05-02-16, 03:42 PM
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I had a similar problem getting a Regina single speed freewheel off the Paff. The removal ridges were not quite as bad as yours but clearly others had tried unsuccessfully.

I eventually got it loose through the following combination:

1. Lots of penetrating oil both sides of the freewheel
2. A much bigger chisel than I wanted to use at first
3. After soaking for several days, I applied heat to the hub....enough to make the penetrating oil smoke a bit, but not enough to really get it too hot. Added more penetrating oil immediately and let it soak for a couple more days. Of course, with the single speed the heat gets to the body more easily.
4. Repeat.
5. Use big chisel and firm, well placed strokes (ie. avoid digging more into the body, avoid slipping, etc). It took a few tries but I was rewarded with removal, and after a cleanup there appears to be no permanent damage.

Unfortunately, the 2 replacement Regina freewheels I found in Italy both sold underneath me, so for now I am running some modern chinese clone.... Couldn't reuse the Regina as the teeth are badly hooked from wear.

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Old 05-02-16, 03:47 PM
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Oh, and I laced modern alloy rims to the original FB hubs - worked out fabulously - the hubs are smooth as butter after all these years, and the rims look, if not quite period correct, pretty good. New spokes too. My rims were even further gone than your - I could put my fingers through the rim in places.

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Old 05-02-16, 03:48 PM
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Mark990, My problem is, if I get the freewheel off and can't reuse it a 4 speed freewheel is $100, more than I want to spend on a freewheel. I would consider a five speed, three speed, or single speed conversion, but would any of those work with this hub? Maybe if I re-spaced it?
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Old 05-02-16, 03:55 PM
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I assumed you are taking it off just to grease the hub and re-lace the wheels - why wouldn't you reuse it? I'd clean up the "removal edges" but its not like you have to take it off regularly.....it looks pretty serviceable to me. Like I said, I would have used my Regina if the teeth weren't worn out!

ps. When putting it back on use some anti-seize (copper or aluminum) so it won't get too badly frozen on next time!

pps. Not sure a 5 speed would fit but I believe you could make a 1 through 3 speed work....single speeds are cheap but not as cool as the multi-gear - not sure 3 speed freewheels are cheaper than the 4-speed.
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