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-   -   What have you been wrenching on lately? (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/1069707-what-have-you-been-wrenching-lately.html)

rccardr 12-03-19 09:25 AM

Headers and tight spaces were one of the reasons I finally sold my 69 Camaro SS. Still have the scars...

stardognine 12-03-19 01:52 PM

I bought this old Cannondale this morning, for parts. The suspension was pretty wacked, but I was really just after the XTR brifters & FD, XT RD & hubs ( on Mavic 217 rims), and several odd goodies. 😎 I haven't mounted anything onto the Killer V yet, except the Coda saddle & Tom Ritchey seatpost. I'm taking a much needed break now. ✌️
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2395622e9.jpeg

noglider 12-03-19 02:11 PM

Last night, I brought a rear wheel to the bike coop to work on it. I had built it for myself, but I had miscalculated the spoke lengths, so I replaced half of the spokes. While I was at it, I even replaced the hub. I found a spare hub which appeared to be in better shape than the one I had. I overhauled the new (old) hub for good measure. I learned how to overhaul a freehub in the process.

I had to remove the freehub from the body of the hub while it wasn't built up as a wheel. I wrapped it in an inner tube to prevent scoring it with the vise. I only succeeded a little. I did score the hub. Is there another way to do this? I guess I could have built the wheel first and then overhauled the hub.

merziac 12-03-19 02:24 PM


Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel (Post 21231279)
Over the extended Thanksgiving weekend, I was able to get my sudden rolling bucket of woes Z28 Camaro (get one thing fixed, and down go the dominoes!) down three hours to see family as I had been denied (by said car issues) at the beginning of November. It was a great time, though I had business to attend to. Thwarted by any combination of rain, lack of light, weekend time (aka day light), a steep and exposed apartment complex driveway, and not being able to work on things curb side, it would be the shed/shop at my parents' place, in 35 weather (ok, with closed doors and a propane heater) where the car would be worked on. Five and a half years ago, I changed plugs in this car. NGK iridium plugs meant to go 100k miles. 55,000 miles in, I pull one and see it gapped at 0.064"--spec is 0.050" and I know I'm stressing the ignition system. Long pre-story short, all eight plugs are changed over the course of two sessions over two days, roughly three hours a piece. To say that changing plugs on an LT1 Camaro with aftermarket headers is difficult is an understatement. Scraped knuckles, bruised and cut backs-of-hands, a big muscle cramp while under the car, and the worst angles and leverages imaginable (both above and below the engine) made for yet another trying effort. And all for semi-naught as an oil leak repair that I paid good money for (very recently) failed, causing hot oil to decently leak out of the engine and onto the block and transmission bellhousing. Which means smoke/steam. Not good to see, and not good to smell. I will be making an appointment to bring it in again for what will likely be warranty work, and hopefully a redone job will be successful.

Below are the plugs in pretty accurate order (the dark ones are completely correct though), with the top of the photo representing the front of the engine. All gaps are huge and from what I can surmise, the same as they were when I bought them. This means that Previous ROS likely didn't gap the plugs, even if the car ran flawlessly afterwards. Dark plug on the passenger side had dirt/oil(?) all over its threads for no reason (nothing leaking from above on the heads) and didn't smell at all like anything. Dark plug on the driver's side had actually backed out a bit and was loose in its threading--the source of one of my exhaust ticks! I have a very quiet engine bay for the first time in years.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...87ff90997f.jpg

Modern Electronic ignition is pretty hard to stress, usually has many times what is needed on tap. Not sure about the newer like yours version and I'm not a GM guy but back in the day I helped several friends get various builds going right with early HEI which could had at the junkyard by the truckload for virtually pennies.

They would build a motor that didn't want to run well, too much compression, crappy gas, poor tuning, etc, screw around and often get it to not run at all, enter HEI and all H**L would break loose, start right up and go like nobody's business always amazing, so simple, many engine builders with egg on their face.

Ford's version would fire 10 year old plugs with no center electrode left sticking out of the porcelain, well over 0.100. I have a spark tester that has no center electrode for this very thing. I have run it on many cars for hours and under load while driving. Any car that ran with it ran just fine, plenty of voltage in reserve.

All that being said, some brands don't like some brands, in general 80's and 90's Fords didn't like Bosch plugs and would run ok while not passing DEQ. Also lots of problems with wizz-bang platinum, iridium, hot rod, snake oil, mega $$$ plugs. When they had lot rot and the battery went dead, flooding, jumping and cranking would foul them to the point where the plugs had to taken out and cleaned to get them going again, regular copper plugs would always fire up if you got it cranking good. ;)

RiddleOfSteel 12-03-19 04:40 PM


Originally Posted by merziac (Post 21231952)
Modern Electronic ignition is pretty hard to stress, usually has many times what is needed on tap. Not sure about the newer like yours version and I'm not a GM guy but back in the day I helped several friends get various builds going right with early HEI which could had at the junkyard by the truckload for virtually pennies.

They would build a motor that didn't want to run well, too much compression, crappy gas, poor tuning, etc, screw around and often get it to not run at all, enter HEI and all H**L would break loose, start right up and go like nobody's business always amazing, so simple, many engine builders with egg on their face.

Ford's version would fire 10 year old plugs with no center electrode left sticking out of the porcelain, well over 0.100. I have a spark tester that has no center electrode for this very thing. I have run it on many cars for hours and under load while driving. Any car that ran with it ran just fine, plenty of voltage in reserve.

All that being said, some brands don't like some brands, in general 80's and 90's Fords didn't like Bosch plugs and would run ok while not passing DEQ. Also lots of problems with wizz-bang platinum, iridium, hot rod, snake oil, mega $$$ plugs. When they had lot rot and the battery went dead, flooding, jumping and cranking would foul them to the point where the plugs had to taken out and cleaned to get them going again, regular copper plugs would always fire up if you got it cranking good. ;)

The original AC Delco platinum plugs, rated for 100k miles, were faulty in design, in that the puck on the center electrode would flake off and get into the cylinder, exhaust, etc. The car would also not run correctly. IIRC, labor hours for a spark plug and wire change on a stock LT1 Camaro is 5.0 hours. With aftermarket headers, plus Shade-Tree ROS, that number gets bigger. The catted down/mid pipe that crosses over from left to right needs to be removed, as does the alternator. PS pump loosened as well if doing wires. Running wires around all those pulleys is also a royal pain.

Copper is the best, and I would prefer to use it, but anybody who wants to go into, over, and around that engine inside that chassis more often than absolutely necessary is insane. So if copper is out (due to 30k mile ideal interval), and platinum still uses pucks that could flake off, then iridium is next. And many Z28 owners have had great experience with the NGKs (as much as I like using OEM parts, especially spark plugs).

merziac 12-03-19 05:02 PM

Yep, like I said, platinum = crap. Lots of the Motorcraft ones didn't work at all when the puck came off, dead miss.

As a FoMoCo Sr. and ASE Master Tech specializing in tune-up, drivability, DEQ, mpg and engine performance, I replaced platinum with copper most of the time.

Over 20 years,1000's of tune-ups and replacements, no comebacks or complaints, they worked just fine in them Fords. ;)

ryansu 12-03-19 05:27 PM

Spent some time post holiday with my recently found Miyata 112 getting it ready for trainer duty. we went from as found

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...23b12a993b.jpg
shake down ride to the market

To removing the hideous foam grips and replacing them with some cheap cloth tape I had in the parts bin , lubing the chain, replacing the crappy plastic pedals with some dual sided ones, greasing the stem and seat post, giving the frame a Pledge polish wipe down since it will be on a covered porch for trainer duty and dremeling some rusty bits. Finally adding a water bottle cage as the ride to nowhere is a thirsty one. In the spring it will get the full overhaul.

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...84b433bf6e.jpg
now I just need to ride it!

SurferRosa 12-04-19 01:01 AM


Originally Posted by ryansu (Post 21232188)
shake down ride to the market

You rode it without a rear brake? I'm telling mom!

ryansu 12-04-19 10:00 AM


Originally Posted by SurferRosa (Post 21232561)
You rode it without a rear brake? I'm telling mom!

I knew some eagle eye would catch that, the bike came to me with the rear brake disconnected and the cables proved too stiff to reconnect so I just removed the cable and housing, but I made sure the front brake was working well and since that is where most of braking power comes from and my market ride is all of 2 km round trip I was willing to live on the edge :D Since its now set up on the trainer I will not endanger myself further

noglider 12-04-19 12:57 PM

I don't even use my rear brake.

SurferRosa 12-04-19 01:21 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 21233165)
I don't even use my rear brake.

You might if the front malfunctioned.

acidlung 12-04-19 03:44 PM

Awesome! I'm building up an aluminum Alpinestars DX from the same era as a gravel bike. I love how all the cables are routed over the top tube. The elevated chainstays are great. That specimen is in beautiful shape. Love the vintage Deore DX rear derailleur. Have fun!

stardognine 12-04-19 05:03 PM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 21233165)
I don't even use my rear brake.

Roger that, Roger. 😉 It took me awhile to get that idea into practice, because of learning wrong, but yeah, the front is the better choice. 😎

DQRider 12-04-19 08:40 PM


Originally Posted by stardognine (Post 21233537)
Roger that, Roger. 😉 It took me awhile to get that idea into practice, because of learning wrong, but yeah, the front is the better choice. 😎

Guys, I don't often take issue with things I see on here, but this is where I've got to call foul. Certainly, the front does the lion's share of the stopping, simply because of the weight transfer. And I understand that Tom is a fan of fixies, which provide their own form of rear wheel control. But for normal riders, with one lever per wheel-brake, telling them to only use the front can lead to disaster.

What happens when you come upon sand in the road? Water, or especially snow and ice? Where would a mountain biker be without the rear brake? Full control of the bicycle requires educated application of both brakes.

Currently, I have a bone chip that migrates around my left elbow now due to an over-enthusiastic application of front brake early last Spring, when the salt/sand mix was still on the roads from winter. I was avoiding a car that ran a stop sign, and slammed into the pavement on my left elbow, before I could configure myself to fall-and-roll properly. Slow reflexes due to old age, I guess.

But the point is, we have two brakes for a reason. Bragging about just using the front is sort of bush-league, in my humble opinion. Erm... what is this box I'm standing on? Says "soap" on the side? Sorry. Winter in Minnesota.

.

noglider 12-04-19 09:01 PM

DQRider and SurferRosa I'm an extremely alert rider. I test my rear brake often to make sure it's still working and to reacquaint how well it works. I use my rear brake almost exclusively when on loose surfaces. I taught cycling classes, and I told students that the danger of flipping over from using the front brake is real but it's also small. The better you know your brake, the safer you are, so I had them practice braking gently, moderately, and hard. Also, if you bend your elbows and brace for your deceleration, you won't go over. I have never gone over the handlebars from braking. So now that you got me thinking about it, I guess I would recommend using both brakes to novice riders. But I wasn't making a recommendation. I was saying what I do. I normally brake with only the front. It's all I need most of the time.

Back to wrenching. I think I was in a bad mood on Monday evening. I did a terrible job on that wheel. The bearings are making noise! And the drive side spokes are all 2mm too short. Gotta do it over again. Sometimes my frugality comes back to bite me.

stardognine 12-05-19 06:09 AM

Who ever said "only" use the front brake? Not me, who you quoted. 😛😉 I'd think most of us here would just assume, that you still need to use good judgement, in any given situation. 😉

That said, for normal riding (with a touring load, in my case) on dry roads, the front brake works much better. ✌️

DQRider 12-05-19 07:34 AM


Originally Posted by stardognine (Post 21234012)
Who ever said "only" use the front brake? Not me, who you quoted. 😛😉 I'd think most of us here would just assume, that you still need to use good judgement, in any given situation. 😉

That said, for normal riding (with a touring load, in my case) on dry roads, the front brake works much better. ✌️

Yeah, I think there is a virulent strain of Cranky Flu going around, mostly due to the crappy winter weather most of us are experiencing, but also the added strain of the holiday season. I've got seven (7) project bikes waiting for me out in the shop, but I haven't done anything with them since I finished the Viner. I've only ridden to work once so far. Time to put the soapbox away and pick up some tools...

.

noglider 12-05-19 09:22 AM

Sorry if I've been overly argumentative. It is my nature, and I frequently have to check it.

stardognine 12-05-19 10:21 AM


Originally Posted by DQRider (Post 21234086)
Yeah, I think there is a virulent strain of Cranky Flu going around, mostly due to the crappy winter weather most of us are experiencing, but also the added strain of the holiday season.

It's too late to apologize now, this is going on your permanent record. 😁😉

Don't stress it, I'm not. ✌️

And I don't see what you're apologizing about, noglider. Maybe to even out something you got away with, at another time? 🤔😁😉

Let's all try to remember, this place ought to be fun, not stressful. 😎

noglider 12-05-19 12:49 PM

stardognine, :beer: :lol:

JaccoW 12-06-19 05:16 PM

Swapped a handlebar and mounted fenders and mudflaps. :)

http://i.imgur.com/oj9kHD7h.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/JY2jgJ0h.jpg

2cam16 12-06-19 05:35 PM

Started some work on the Fuji. It polished nicely.
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...ef863756_b.jpgIMG_1099 by 2cam16, on Flickr
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...b5faf53f_b.jpgIMG_1101 by 2cam16, on Flickr
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...eba6ae97_b.jpgIMG_1098 by 2cam16, on Flickr
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...eb3e596b_b.jpgIMG_1096 by 2cam16, on Flickr

rosefarts 12-07-19 08:24 AM

My toe! Yesterday I had surgery on the distal joint. Saws, rongeurs, and a single titanium screw.

It's pretty painful.

I'll go ahead and apologize because today I'm glued to the couch and floating on pain meds. Who knows what I'll type.

noglider 12-07-19 11:08 AM

Beautiful fenders. What are they, and what are they made of?

stardognine 12-07-19 08:20 PM

Well, I installed my XTR 9-speed brifters today, along with Avid V-brakes and some crabon fibber bar ends. I was able to re-use the XTR brake cable housings, but the ones for the shifters were thrashed. After all that, the shifters aren't working too well, lol, but from what I've read, it's pretty easy to de-gunk them.

But the brakes work great now, and the cockpit has a much nicer vibe to it. 👍 I got in a short test ride, but it started raining, so I called it a day
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...999c22fe9.jpeg
. 🙄


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