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Need help, bike came, can't ride it!

Old 09-02-16, 03:21 PM
  #151  
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@horatio, I agree, but I would also caution that different kinds of bikes need different kinds of fit. The cargo bike leaves her sitting completely upright or almost. That is not her goal on the road bike, not should it be, so the goal is to get comfortable, not to match the fit entirely. Here is some stuff to get used to, and there is some stuff to adjust. Finding the difference is sometimes tricky.
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Old 09-02-16, 03:34 PM
  #152  
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
@horatio, I agree, but I would also caution that different kinds of bikes need different kinds of fit. The cargo bike leaves her sitting completely upright or almost. That is not her goal on the road bike, not should it be, so the goal is to get comfortable, not to match the fit entirely. Here is some stuff to get used to, and there is some stuff to adjust. Finding the difference is sometimes tricky.
Can't argue with that! A good place to start is saddle height and fore/aft placement for KOPS. That should transfer from one bike to the other.
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Old 09-02-16, 03:57 PM
  #153  
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Just say no to KOPS!
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Old 09-02-16, 03:57 PM
  #154  
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It works great for me.
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Old 09-02-16, 04:08 PM
  #155  
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I looked up Bullitt Bluebird. Since you like it = put some drop handlebars on that; call it a day. It fits, you aren't interested in aero, or riding faster.
Then, politely thank hubby for good intentions, enablers make crazy (but expensive) mates at times. Best to pass on some of their offerings.
Sell the DeRosa or put it on the wall in honor of Dad's bike.
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Old 09-02-16, 04:29 PM
  #156  
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Originally Posted by horatio View Post
It works great for me.
KOPS has been orthodoxy long enough that one would expect it works for many, maybe even most, people. That doesn't mean the logic behind it is sound.
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Old 09-02-16, 05:17 PM
  #157  
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
KOPS has been orthodoxy long enough that one would expect it works for many, maybe even most, people. That doesn't mean the logic behind it is sound.
True. But my "professional" fittings ended up with a KOPS placement after all was said and done. I tried the Lemond technique. It hurt my knees. Every good fit is unique to the rider.
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Old 09-02-16, 06:07 PM
  #158  
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Originally Posted by nycphotography View Post
simple question for the fit of the bike:

When riding, can you support your body with your core when your hands barely touching the bars? On the tops? on the hoods? on the drops? You SHOULD be able to in all 3 positions, with your elbows bent. If you force yourself to bend your elbows and keep them in by your body, does it take the pressure off your hands (and also drop your shoulders)?

...

Funny, the last few times I've been out on my bike I've been paying attention to this, thinking about it. It's about adequate core strength. In my 6-month layoff I know I atrophied all over the place, and it shows (well maybe it doesn't 'show', but I sure feel it!).


It's a beautiful bike, and, were it mine, I'd work like hell to make it work.
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Old 09-02-16, 06:10 PM
  #159  
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I'm going to be a bit harsh but I think that cargomama needs to learn to adapt to the bike. Adjust the seat height and angle and the bar height and angle to the best she can, and then just ride. If she can only ride 10 minutes and her hands and body are SLIGHTLY sore and it goes away shortly then do a bunch of 10 minute rides with rests in between. Humans are adaptable. Instead of sitting at the computer leaning back, lean forward and work your core muscles. Just like breaking in shoes, the shoe adapts to the foot and the foot adapts to the shoe. Don't give up on the bike without putting some work into it.
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Old 09-02-16, 06:54 PM
  #160  
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Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
I notice when I have too much pressure on my hands it's a sign that my saddle nose needs to be raised up. I do this very incrementally and a tiny bit can have a huge impact.
I tweaked this today and I think there was some improvement
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Old 09-02-16, 07:02 PM
  #161  
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I will go back and look at the replies but I wanted to update, the technomic stem and noodle handlebars definitely made an improvement, not enormous but unquestionably improved! I also tipped the seat up to even and moved it forward a bit (though I did not have a zero-setback post handy).

I was able to ride the bike at least three times longer/farther than before (maybe bordering on a quarter of a mile!) and actually totally enjoyed it when going slightly uphill. I noticed when going uphill I was actually pulling on the bottom of the hoods for leverage, in doing so it eased the pressure on my hands on the tops of the hoods which felt way better. I still had obvious pain in my hands (and red marks showing where the hoods were) but not the unbearable experience of before.

This. bike. is. fast
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Old 09-02-16, 07:17 PM
  #162  
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...this is only one man's opinion, but yes, I think you chose unwisely. You have doubtless by now gathered in the vast amount of well intentioned, well informed advice offered in your thread.

Two observations if I may:

1. Road bike covers a vast array of differently purposed and thus differently designed bicycles.

2. The one you selected from far away was, in it's day, something akin to an exotic sports car model.

So if you were looking for the bike equivalent of a Ferrari, that's great, because that's about what you ended up with, whether it was custom made for a woman or not.

You can't pick up enough information on the internet to genuinely understand fitting yourself comfortably to a bicycle (and vice versa) without a lot of reading and experiment. I encourage you to do so. But it is vastly easier to do that experimentation on something a little bit more utilitarian...like say a mid 80's Asian production bicycle....because there are more cheap used parts available, and because you paid less for your experimental vehicle in the first place, so there's not much to lose on a 200 buck investment.

I don't know where you are, and I have certainly heard from women I've known and encountered here locally tha smaller bikes are harder to find....but they do pop up here pretty regularly if you look. Maybe it's different where you are, I have no way of knowing.

But the combination of a bike that was designed, built, outfitted with components, and put on the road as a stiff, quick handling machine for road racing does not bode well for your intended usage...and unless you're doing all your own mechanical work (you might be), every time you swap something out it costs you not only for the parts, but also for the labor. If you do intend to do your own work, you're still better off working on something a little bit lower end so if you do damage it a little, it doesn't cost you anything.

Only you know what you want. I would just hate to see you end up following a lot of well intentioned advice and still be unhappy with the final outcome....which as you have already speculated, might turn out to be harder to resell and get your investment back. Nitto parts on a De Rosa will be a turnoff to anyone looking for a De Rosa. It's Cinelli or go home.

The best advice I can give you is to look around where you are located, find someone who actually has a crappe tonne of experience with different sorts of bicycles, who has no motive to sell you one, and see if maybe you can get that person to help you with the whole deal. Be honest about what you do and don't know, and your ambitions with the bike....as you have been here.

Pax tibicum.
I appreciate your perspective very much, I am wondering though, how does my 'intended usage' differ from what the bike is meant for? I don't mean to carry luggage, mount fenders or go touring on this bike, I don't want to be upright. I intend to zip around town and the trail and have a good time. The only things I have mentioned that seem to be indicative otherwise is that I want to be comfortable and enjoy the ride. Is this bike truly only able to be ridden if it's uncomfortable, in full aero-tuck in the pace lines?
The labor expense is not a huge concern, I am enjoying tinkering with the bike and I am being very careful to keep all the original components so if I let it go it can go to someone wanting the full Italian monty! I have no intention of doing any permanent change that could not be changed back in the future.
Anyway, you may very well be correct that this is a round peg and square hole situation, but I wouldn't be satisfied not to give it a try myself After all you never know how a bike can stretch a rider!
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Old 09-02-16, 07:18 PM
  #163  
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Originally Posted by Ed. View Post
Funny, the last few times I've been out on my bike I've been paying attention to this, thinking about it. It's about adequate core strength.
+1 I think that the considerable improvement in my core strength has been one of the big, though unexpected benefits of all my cycling in the past 5 or 6 years. I'm very comfortable on all my bikes. I hardly plan for 50 mile days any more (just plan how much water to bring) and my hands don't hurt at all nor go numb. And all that core strength has caused other aches and pains to go away. Yes it took time and 'bull headedness" to develop that core strength but it's worth it. Better than expected condition as I approach the start of my 66th trip around the sun.
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Old 09-02-16, 08:10 PM
  #164  
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Regarding your hands being red from hoods: I know for me I spend most of my time in the curve of the top (the shoulders? the ramp?) and not the hoods proper or drops unless I'm riding in a lot of traffic or downhill (where I end up in the drops to be able to get enough brake power... rambly aside but where your issue seems to be largely comfort, when I first started using drop bars and actually going into the drops 2 years ago, I found it scary as hell. I felt like my face was being tipped into the road and I was going to lose control of the bike. Determined to make it work, I started by keeping one hand on a hood and got used to riding one handed for short stretches while working my core and staying balanced in that position, then with one hand on the hoods and the other hand in the drops/hooks to power the front brake better, then when riding on a flat smooth stretch, swapping from tops to hoods to hooks to drops and back again in a circuit until my balance, core strength and comfort improved. I should note this is with a comfortable 'French fit' and seat basically level with handlebars. This may not be an issue for you but if it is, you're not alone!)

At any rate, I thought you might find this resource helpful:
Lovely Bicycle!: Drop Bar Hand Positions: an Introduction

I've also seen it noted here and there that women with smaller hands find some models of brakes easier to get leverage and ergonomic comfort with than others. Though I can't recall which specific models came up in the discussion (helpful, I know!) but might be something else to consider as you sort out fit and so on.
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Old 09-02-16, 08:11 PM
  #165  
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Originally Posted by cargomama View Post
I appreciate your perspective very much, I am wondering though, how does my 'intended usage' differ from what the bike is meant for?
...as I said, you are the one who needs to figure out what you want. Here are some things youi said initially that I used in making my assessment:

Originally Posted by cargomama View Post
...I can maybe go 1/8 of a mile before HAVING to stop due to my hands buzzing/hurting so badly (they can keep being sensitive for hours afterwards). I knew I would probably have to get a taller stem with a shorter throw/handlebar but I'm not sure it can make enough of a difference. I am so stretched out on it and concerned of causing nerve damage it's so bad. The current stem already has a pretty short throw and the bars don't extend far at all. I'm not sure if my hands are too small or what but even using the brakes from the hoods is so difficult I can barely make a mild descent safely.

The other wrinkle is I hate the shifting, hate it...the brifters, the derailer...I know Campy is great but
I ride an Alfine 11 IGH and inefficient it may be, I really like it. That is on a bike that I regularly push about 100lbs though, for this one it is so light comparatively I don't need them and have given up shifting and just keep it in one gear.
Originally Posted by cargomama View Post
Thank you, I really want to keep it! I think this bike is my only shot to ever ride on drops, the size alone is small enough to give me a shot...of course it hasn't gone well so far. Is it ridiculous to turn a de rosa into an upright? Would it even work?
Originally Posted by cargomama View Post
I am considering selling it as is, I really don't want to but I'm afraid of putting a lot of money and time into it and then just having a bike that still doesn't work for me but now no one else wants it either. What is it about it that REQUIRES it to be a "racing" bike? What fundamentally would be different about a vintage touring bike?
Originally Posted by cargomama View Post
I wanted a fun, sprightly ride. My cargo bike is so comparatively heavy I just wanted something simple and light (though ironically my Bullitt is infinitely easier to ride and more comfortable by far). I don't need the braze-ons...is its geometry so radically and decidedly racing that it cannot be used comfortably no matter what? I was hoping the frame being nearly "square" would give me a fighting chance :/
Once more, I know it's a very pretty bicycle cycle. If you want to keep it, I am A OK with that...number one.

But the idea that it's your only chance to ride something lighter, and simpler, and a little more "sprightly" is, I think you'll agree with me, absurd on its face. I don't know what else to tell you that would not be a repetition of stuff I've already said. There....are....other....bicycles....that....will....work....for....you. But they will not be this one, and if you want to try all sorts of modifications to the components, and have both the budget and the time for that, I'm certainly not going to write to you that you can not. I'm just one of those "easier is better" guys...call me lazy if you want to, you wouldn't be the first.

IN parting, I would caution you against accepting advice like, "Tough it out, and build up. Your hands will eventually get stronger and you and the bike will mold together as one." That's the sort of program that leads to chronic injury and sports medicine appointments. A good way to figure out whether your saddle angle and setback are in the ballpark is whether you can sit upright on the bike and ride no hands...but be careful if you've not done it before.


Nothing you can do economically is going to change the shifting, and a smaller frame like yours made from SLX is overkill on stiff...which has already been pointed out. You can make up for that with fatter tyres, which you plan on doing, but fatter tyres come with a new set of considerations. If I want to go fast on something, I'm usually in the 700x25c range. And I bet I weigh twice what you do. I have the opposite problem with frame flex.


Good luck with it if you keep it, good luck if you sell it. Generally good luck all around.
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Old 09-02-16, 08:17 PM
  #166  
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Originally Posted by cargomama View Post

I noticed when going uphill I was actually pulling on the bottom of the hoods for leverage, in doing so it eased the pressure on my hands on the tops of the hoods which felt way better.

...one of the key elements in keeping too much weight off your hands is always pushing hard enough on the pedals to do exactly this, even on the flats. It's an acquired skill. Combined with balance on the saddle, it's a key element in avoiding problems in your wrists and hands.
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Old 09-02-16, 10:13 PM
  #167  
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...as I said, you are the one who needs to figure out what you want. Here are some things youi said initially that I used in making my assessment:









Once more, I know it's a very pretty bicycle cycle. If you want to keep it, I am A OK with that...number one.

But the idea that it's your only chance to ride something lighter, and simpler, and a little more "sprightly" is, I think you'll agree with me, absurd on its face. I don't know what else to tell you that would not be a repetition of stuff I've already said. There....are....other....bicycles....that....will....work....for....you. But they will not be this one, and if you want to try all sorts of modifications to the components, and have both the budget and the time for that, I'm certainly not going to write to you that you can not. I'm just one of those "easier is better" guys...call me lazy if you want to, you wouldn't be the first.

IN parting, I would caution you against accepting advice like, "Tough it out, and build up. Your hands will eventually get stronger and you and the bike will mold together as one." That's the sort of program that leads to chronic injury and sports medicine appointments. A good way to figure out whether your saddle angle and setback are in the ballpark is whether you can sit upright on the bike and ride no hands...but be careful if you've not done it before.


Nothing you can do economically is going to change the shifting, and a smaller frame like yours made from SLX is overkill on stiff...which has already been pointed out. You can make up for that with fatter tyres, which you plan on doing, but fatter tyres come with a new set of considerations. If I want to go fast on something, I'm usually in the 700x25c range. And I bet I weigh twice what you do. I have the opposite problem with frame flex.


Good luck with it if you keep it, good luck if you sell it. Generally good luck all around.

I will give you a counterpoint -----

- simply ------ Its a late 80's - late 90's DeRosa --- its not a Specialized Venge or Shiv

It is a boutique brand to be sure - with a helluva pedigree, --- but I think the Ferrari comparison is not valid --- a comparison to a Porsche PAnamera , maybe ---- but these old school machines are amazingly adaptable --- no it wont be able to fit 32c tires , but with a little work and tinkering, -- the old school "squarish" Italian geometry can be quite comfortable

A bike between 48c and 53 c is going to give a stiff ride regardless of the steel --- its not like SLX is going to be stiffer than SL or Aelle or Cromor or Brain --- It will deliver a very similar ride ------- so will a Trek, so will an old Specialized Allez, -- in those sizes
I'm a shorty too - I ride a 53/54 --- it is just something I'm accustomed to --- but that said --- I don't think there is any kind of hierarchy we have to go through to deserve our next bike

The OP, curbmama , --- if that were the case, -- her utility bike would lead to an old touring bike, then maybe to a Surly, and then possibly to a dusty old Trek, -- and then is she ready for a sportier bike? -- Poppycock
Lifes too short --- Outside the realm of specialty equipment - an old Italian stage race geometry bike is pretty darn general purpose with the exception of tire clearance and braze ons

- It sounds like she is moving forward and making the necessary adjustments and hopefully will be clicking off longer rides before long
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Old 09-03-16, 12:35 AM
  #168  
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Originally Posted by DMC707 View Post
I will give you a counterpoint -----...

I'm a shorty too - I ride a 53/54 --- it is just something I'm accustomed to --- but that said --- I don't think there is any kind of hierarchy we have to go through to deserve our next bike

The OP, curbmama , --- if that were the case, -- her utility bike would lead to an old touring bike, then maybe to a Surly, and then possibly to a dusty old Trek, -- and then is she ready for a sportier bike? -- Poppycock
...
...there is some poppycock here all right. It's in your characterization of what I said. If you cannot understand how someone could state quite plainly what I have stated, as good faith opinion, or are unable to read it without taking it as a challenge to your own knowledge base and thus an opportunity to indulge in a battle of expertise, please refrain from further addressing me. Thank you.

I'm out on this. As stated, OP good luck with it.
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Old 09-03-16, 08:47 AM
  #169  
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Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...there is some poppycock here all right. It's in your characterization of what I said. If you cannot understand how someone could state quite plainly what I have stated, as good faith opinion, or are unable to read it without taking it as a challenge to your own knowledge base and thus an opportunity to indulge in a battle of expertise, please refrain from further addressing me. Thank you.

I'm out on this. As stated, OP good luck with it.
Interesting, -- tell me more about that
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Old 09-03-16, 08:57 AM
  #170  
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Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
I looked up Bullitt Bluebird. .
I did too -- I shouldn't have -- now I want one --- since I live in the sticks, a e-bike style pedal assist rear hub would be the way I would go to hopefully keep me from showing up at the grocers or the library or wherever , as a big sweaty mess about to collapse
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Old 09-03-16, 09:45 AM
  #171  
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I'm 5'4" also and know full well how much fun it is to get an optimized position on a bike for both efficiency and comfort.
My bike is a 1999 49cm Merlin Ti with same year Campy Record carbon 9 speed brifters...ugh...that word, and Chorus components. I use a Chris King 1" threaded head set with a 1" to 1 1/8" threaded to threadless adapter. I'm also using an Easton EC90 42cm shallow drop/reach handlebar and a FSA 120mm 1 1/8" stem. I'm also a Fit Kit certified fitter but from back in the 80's/90's and have used this system for well over a decade but had another FK fitter measure and fit me...it's really not something you can do yourself properly.

I hope you are not making changes/adjustments based solely on what you are reading, what seems to feel good at the change and how the bike looks in its' static position...these are the worst ways of fitting yourself.

My suggestions are:
Find a local shop that has a competent fitter...he/she should take measurements of the bikes current positioning as well as your position on the bike while the bike is on a trainer, you are in your normal riding kit and have warmed up for 10 to 15 minutes. At this point your position should be visually evaluated and notes taken identifying problem areas on the bike and body. This establishes a "base line".
Gross adjustments can be made and noted/marked. You should now take your bike and begin riding it. Pay attention to how you feel on the bike and after each ride note, in writing, how you feel, what hurts, what feels stretched, what feels good, etc. After 4 or 5 rides and notes you should talk to the fitter about your rides and he/she should pop your bike on a trainer to repeat the initial set up, view your position again and make minor adjustments also marking them in the "log". This may need to be repeated several times until the optimum position is achieved.
A good fitter will also pay close attention to your feet, shoes, cleats and how they are positioned to the pedal also for efficiency and comfort.

I did this for my customers either at the end of the day or before we opened, never during business hours unless I could isolate myself and the customer from the public...no distractions. A shop that cares about its' customers will do this even if the bike did not come from their shop but of course at a cost...I didn't charge customers for this service only when the bike met a price point ie. more costly racing bikes...road, mountain or cross.

Replace the quill stem with a 1" to 1 1/8" quill adapter allowing you to quickly and easily swapping out stems...at the local bike shop...until the correct stem if found...without having to remove the tape, etc. on one side of the bars...what a pain.
Use shallow drop, shallow reach drop bars.

Here is an ugly truth about pre end of the nineties "brifters"...I hate that term but it works...THEY ARE BUILT FOR PEOPLE WITH LARGE HANDS/LONG FINGERS...At the end of the nineties they finally reduced the body size of the brifter allowing people with smaller hands to access the shifters and levers more easily. Your brifters look to be of the older, larger style and you may never be able to comfortably reach the shifters and levers from the drops.

My brifters are of the smaller body and fit my small to barely medium hands well. I can shift from the drops easily and can hook the middle finger around the brake lever for control braking...I do have my brake pads adjusted to allow middle and index fingers to hook around the levers to pull them back a bit with no pad rubbing...proportional short people do need some tweaks on their bikes to duplicate what taller have normally...not a big deal.
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Old 09-03-16, 10:38 AM
  #172  
jade408
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Originally Posted by Kai Winters View Post
I'm 5'4" also and know full well how much fun it is to get an optimized position on a bike for both efficiency and comfort.
My bike is a 1999 49cm Merlin Ti with same year Campy Record carbon 9 speed brifters...ugh...that word, and Chorus components. I use a Chris King 1" threaded head set with a 1" to 1 1/8" threaded to threadless adapter. I'm also using an Easton EC90 42cm shallow drop/reach handlebar and a FSA 120mm 1 1/8" stem. I'm also a Fit Kit certified fitter but from back in the 80's/90's and have used this system for well over a decade but had another FK fitter measure and fit me...it's really not something you can do yourself properly.

I hope you are not making changes/adjustments based solely on what you are reading, what seems to feel good at the change and how the bike looks in its' static position...these are the worst ways of fitting yourself.

My suggestions are:
Find a local shop that has a competent fitter...he/she should take measurements of the bikes current positioning as well as your position on the bike while the bike is on a trainer, you are in your normal riding kit and have warmed up for 10 to 15 minutes. At this point your position should be visually evaluated and notes taken identifying problem areas on the bike and body. This establishes a "base line".
Gross adjustments can be made and noted/marked. You should now take your bike and begin riding it. Pay attention to how you feel on the bike and after each ride note, in writing, how you feel, what hurts, what feels stretched, what feels good, etc. After 4 or 5 rides and notes you should talk to the fitter about your rides and he/she should pop your bike on a trainer to repeat the initial set up, view your position again and make minor adjustments also marking them in the "log". This may need to be repeated several times until the optimum position is achieved.
A good fitter will also pay close attention to your feet, shoes, cleats and how they are positioned to the pedal also for efficiency and comfort.

I did this for my customers either at the end of the day or before we opened, never during business hours unless I could isolate myself and the customer from the public...no distractions. A shop that cares about its' customers will do this even if the bike did not come from their shop but of course at a cost...I didn't charge customers for this service only when the bike met a price point ie. more costly racing bikes...road, mountain or cross.

Replace the quill stem with a 1" to 1 1/8" quill adapter allowing you to quickly and easily swapping out stems...at the local bike shop...until the correct stem if found...without having to remove the tape, etc. on one side of the bars...what a pain.
Use shallow drop, shallow reach drop bars.

Here is an ugly truth about pre end of the nineties "brifters"...I hate that term but it works...THEY ARE BUILT FOR PEOPLE WITH LARGE HANDS/LONG FINGERS...At the end of the nineties they finally reduced the body size of the brifter allowing people with smaller hands to access the shifters and levers more easily. Your brifters look to be of the older, larger style and you may never be able to comfortably reach the shifters and levers from the drops.

My brifters are of the smaller body and fit my small to barely medium hands well. I can shift from the drops easily and can hook the middle finger around the brake lever for control braking...I do have my brake pads adjusted to allow middle and index fingers to hook around the levers to pull them back a bit with no pad rubbing...proportional short people do need some tweaks on their bikes to duplicate what taller have normally...not a big deal.
Oh! That helps. I have test ridden some brifters and hated it. I have small hands with long fingers. Could not shift without strain. Way prefer any other shift option - downtube, stem, barend......
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Old 09-03-16, 10:56 AM
  #173  
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There are a lot of things to get used to with this bike. Tightening your upper body muscles ,shoulders, arms and hands is the wrong thing to do. Core muscles should hold you up, not your hands. Bend your elbows, relax the upper body and ride it. Power flows from your stomach and legs, not your arms and hands. It takes time to build the core muscles and endurance as you are not used to using them.

Edit: To clarify, I am constantly reminding myself not to lock my shoulders and quit resting on my hands. More so for me on long rides. When my hands get sore or numb, its not my fit, I locked my elbows and am resting on the bars. Shoulder pain, locked my shoulders. Fatigue sets in and I have to remind myself that I just need to relax and use proper form. Happens less and less now.
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Old 09-03-16, 12:25 PM
  #174  
Kai Winters
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Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Oh! That helps. I have test ridden some brifters and hated it. I have small hands with long fingers. Could not shift without strain. Way prefer any other shift option - downtube, stem, barend......
Most of today's brifters...ugh...are somewhat more compact in design allowing for more comfortable reach in all hand positions for the average person.
Generally, as has bee stated several times in this thread, the average rider positions his/her hands on the flats, top of the bars, or the hoods. It takes practice over time to get used to being in the drops and even then there are more positions in the drops...the hooks, the bump...if your bars have an "ergo" bump...the flats...towards the ends and I sometimes place my hands overhanging the ends just a bit just for another position.

People with smaller hands can adjust their brake calipers so it takes more pull to engage them. This allows you to hook several fingers over the levers and pull them in a bit though not engaging the brakes...pads or disks...gotta remember disks. But again most people generally have their hands on the top of the bars making braking and shifting a bit easier.

It also takes practice and miles/hours on the bike to create the muscle memory of the bodies/hands positions on the bars, etc. Especially if somewhat new to the sport and a new bike or type of bike.

But it all has to start with a good baseline...the bike has to fit...the rider has to be properly and correctly fitted and monitored until the fit is correct for the newer rider to a proper bike and the time for the body and mind to fit itself to the bike.
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Old 09-03-16, 12:49 PM
  #175  
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This is a constructive thread in many areas and excellent for the C&V forum. I don't care what you ride but if you don't find a happy medium of comfort, you won't enjoy it.

Another to consider, tires.

I'm sure many of us here have been asked by others why we ride an old steel bike. There's many but one answer might be about the ride qualities vs. modern aluminum or cf frames. Not always the case but since it was brought up, most any bike can be transformed or significantly changed with tires. Most new bikes come with cheaper, lower grade rubber. I'll guarantee if you swap to a high grade tire, it'll make a difference.

The same could be said for our beloved vintage steeds. The OP may not have the luxury assortment of bikes or wheels with a range of 700c tires to swap, but crucial to get up to speed about it.

Road surface imperfections from miniscule to large takes a toll on a body and it all starts with the tires. Like a choice of saddle, this is going to take some investment and time. Bite the wallet and go for it. If you don't like the tires, re-sell and try another brand / type / size, etc..

Clocking miles in on a regular basis is going to tell you many things, not to base from others opinions. I've read many idiotic tire opinions by those who've only based it on tire construction or 'heard' about from someone else. (A sample are tubular - clincher tires for clincher rim only. Comically, the negativity mostly comes from those whom never ridden them, let alone purchased.)

Fortunately, tire technology has vastly improved with an incredible amount of choices. That might be the only issue and leading to confusion, but its still worth it. There's also the general consensus you pay for what you get.
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