Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Leather saddle and Propert's leather and saddle soap

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Leather saddle and Propert's leather and saddle soap

Old 09-17-16, 06:21 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
Posts: 71

Bikes: Cilo Swiss

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Leather saddle and Propert's leather and saddle soap

Hello all

Yesterday I bought Brooks b17 saddle. Of course I want to take care of it.
I have Propert's solution for leather. It's 20+ years old.
What is your experience with it?
Is it good for Brooks leather saddles?



Last edited by Hrvojeb; 09-17-16 at 06:36 AM.
Hrvojeb is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 06:49 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 810
Liked 159 Times in 80 Posts
often asked question, and you are likely to be flooded with many conflicting theories.
But tensioned leather saddles are not baseball gloves, horse saddles or hiking boots.
Tensioned leather saddles need a particular treatment or you can very easily shorten their usable life.
I find it best to follow the advice of the manufacturer.
MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS, SPARE PARTS

Now let the regulars all promote their special treatments. It will get very confusing.
Or just get a small tin of Proofide and follow the manufacturers advice.
Big Block is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 06:57 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
Posts: 71

Bikes: Cilo Swiss

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Big Block
often asked question, and you are likely to be flooded with many conflicting theories.
But tensioned leather saddles are not baseball gloves, horse saddles or hiking boots.
Tensioned leather saddles need a particular treatment or you can very easily shorten their usable life.
I find it best to follow the advice of the manufacturer.
MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS, SPARE PARTS

Now let the regulars all promote their special treatments. It will get very confusing.
Or just get a small tin of Proofide and follow the manufacturers advice.
It's not a problem for me to buy Brooks' solution, but I was wandering since I already do have this Propert's saddle soap, will it also do the job. Brooks' aren't cheap.
Hrvojeb is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 07:05 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 810
Liked 159 Times in 80 Posts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saddle_soap

Saddle soap is a proprietary compound used for cleaning, conditioning, and protecting leather. It typically contains mild soap, softening ingredients such as lanolin, and preservatives such as beeswax. It is commonly used on leather footwear, saddles, and other items of horse tack, hence its name.

when you soften the leather you will start shortening its useful life. Tensioned leather saddles are not leather footwear, or horse saddles or other items of horse tack.
Big Block is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 07:08 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
Posts: 71

Bikes: Cilo Swiss

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Big Block
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saddle_soap

Saddle soap is a proprietary compound used for cleaning, conditioning, and protecting leather. It typically contains mild soap, softening ingredients such as lanolin, and preservatives such as beeswax. It is commonly used on leather footwear, saddles, and other items of horse tack, hence its name.

when you soften the leather you will start shortening its useful life. Tensioned leather saddles are not leather footwear, or horse saddles or other items of horse tack.
Oh, I guess you're right.
Then it's Brooks' Proofide what I need to buy.
Thank you.
Hrvojeb is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 07:19 AM
  #6  
verktyg
 
verktyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 4,035

Bikes: Current favorites: 1988 Peugeot Birraritz, 1984 Gitane Super Corsa, 1980s DeRosa, 1981 Bianchi Campione Del Mondo, 1992 Paramount OS, 1988 Colnago Technos, 1985 RalieghUSA SBDU Team Pro

Liked 1,248 Times in 659 Posts
@Big Block

I've used Brooks Proofide on my leather saddles for over 40 years. I figure Brooks knows what's best for their saddles.

Proofide serves several purposes. It soaks into the leather and provides natural oils to preserve the leather plus it gives a degree of water resistance.

What's in a can of Proofide?

Here's the secret ingredients: Tallow, Cod oil, Vegetable oil, Paraffin wax, Beeswax and Citronella oil.


It's best to apply a heavy coating to the underside of the saddle for waterproofing then rub a lighter coating into the top to protect the leather.


One thing to avoid is "Neatsfoot Oil" unless it's guaranteed to be the real stuff.

"Neatsfoot oil is a yellow oil rendered and purified from the shin bones and feet (but not the hooves) of cattle. "Neat" in the oil's name comes from an old English word for cattle."

Much of the Neatsfoot Oil sold in the US is a pure petroleum based product which will damage leather goods. There are also products labeled Neatsfoot Oil that are a mixture of natural and petroleum oils. Avoid those too!

@Hrvojeb " Brooks' aren't cheap."

How much did you pay for the saddle??? ...and you want to save a few bucks by not using Proofide???


verktyg


Chas.


1965, 1967, 1971 Brooks Pros treated with Proofide:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
BrooksPro 067.jpg (98.2 KB, 156 views)
File Type: jpg
BrooksPro 045.jpg (94.6 KB, 155 views)
File Type: jpg
BrooksPro 068.jpg (97.7 KB, 155 views)
__________________
Don't believe everything you think! History is written by those who weren't there....

Chas. ;-)


Last edited by verktyg; 09-17-16 at 07:29 AM.
verktyg is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 07:47 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
Posts: 71

Bikes: Cilo Swiss

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by verktyg
@Big Block

I've used Brooks Proofide on my leather saddles for over 40 years. I figure Brooks knows what's best for their saddles.

Proofide serves several purposes. It soaks into the leather and provides natural oils to preserve the leather plus it gives a degree of water resistance.

What's in a can of Proofide?

Here's the secret ingredients: Tallow, Cod oil, Vegetable oil, Paraffin wax, Beeswax and Citronella oil.


It's best to apply a heavy coating to the underside of the saddle for waterproofing then rub a lighter coating into the top to protect the leather.


One thing to avoid is "Neatsfoot Oil" unless it's guaranteed to be the real stuff.

"Neatsfoot oil is a yellow oil rendered and purified from the shin bones and feet (but not the hooves) of cattle. "Neat" in the oil's name comes from an old English word for cattle."

Much of the Neatsfoot Oil sold in the US is a pure petroleum based product which will damage leather goods. There are also products labeled Neatsfoot Oil that are a mixture of natural and petroleum oils. Avoid those too!

@Hrvojeb " Brooks' aren't cheap."

How much did you pay for the saddle??? ...and you want to save a few bucks by not using Proofide???


verktyg


Chas.


1965, 1967, 1971 Brooks Pros treated with Proofide:
You are of course completely right.
Thank you
Hrvojeb is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 08:05 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 20,346
Liked 2,866 Times in 2,020 Posts
Propert's is good on the top of the saddle if and only if the saddle is dirty, I have an Ideale that came to me that way. Nothing damper that a wrung out sponge followed by a terry towel buff.

Actually, wish the Brooks product was the same formula as 40 years ago.
repechage is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 08:24 AM
  #9  
Young Vintage
 
Wordwreckin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 102
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I've used proof hide on good condition saddles. I use sno-seal and Obenaufs products on not-so-good condition saddles and the results have been great. The Obenaufs leather oil and heavy duty leather conditioner are good, high quality stuff and if I'm being honest sno-seal plus the leather oil probably does a better job protecting and preserving than the proofhide. This is a very divisive topic and if it's a good condition or rare saddle I would stick with the proofhide.
Wordwreckin is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 08:45 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
ollo_ollo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Soviet of Oregon or Pensacola FL
Posts: 5,355

Bikes: Still have a few left!

Liked 561 Times in 274 Posts
Just a word of caution. Application of too much Proofide will soften the leather enough to let it sag. These pics show a B17 that I bought at a Seattle swap meet for $10 about 15 years ago.

Although less than 1 year old at the time, seller said he frequently applied Proofide top & bottom, until the Saddle softened, Sagged and became very uncomfortable. He concluded it was only good for display and priced it accordingly. I took a chance, also found it uncomfortable, but after lacing with rawhide, it feels similar to my other (broken in) Brooks. I have not treated it further.

I am small and find a Brooks fairly comfortable right out of the box but they improve over time. My Brooks do have different thickness & stiffness of leather.

The lowest priced, standard model B17's bought new, with a light application of Proofide, broke in & fit my posterior within 400-500 miles of riding. But I have a more expensive B17 Champion Special, with thicker/stiffer leather and it changed very slowly over several thousands of miles. I have 2 other B17 Specials bought new, but less ridden, along with a B15, B72 and B66, all from the 60's-70's that still are in "as new" configuration. Don
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Tailwind-Old-Brooks-Saddle.jpg (92.9 KB, 142 views)
File Type: jpg
Brooks-Laced.jpg (96.4 KB, 144 views)

Last edited by ollo_ollo; 09-17-16 at 08:47 AM. Reason: add info
ollo_ollo is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 11:27 AM
  #11  
Stop reading my posts!
 
unworthy1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 12,768
Liked 1,190 Times in 873 Posts
saddle soap (as big block and Chas have alluded to) is for CLEANing dirty equestrian saddles and other leather goods that are dirty, too dirty to just wipe off or brush off. And other than basic soap (which you could ALSO employ on dirty leather goods, try a bar of Ivory for example) this product just "buffers" the soap with oils/fats like lanolin. So it's not a choice for conditioning and preserving the leather of a Brooks or similar "tensioned" bicycle saddle, but if yours is so filthy it needs soap to clean it, then use the Properts (or Kiwi or Fiebings) saddle soap with very little water, wipe it dry with a towel and allow it air-dry...then use Proofide (or the dubbin of your choice but Proofide is best)...sparingly.
unworthy1 is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 11:31 AM
  #12  
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
Posts: 2,717

Bikes: '74 Raleigh International utility; '98 Moser Forma road; '92 Viner Pro CX upright

Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Obenauff's fan here - it has so much beeswax, it smells like honey
bulldog1935 is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 11:42 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
Posts: 71

Bikes: Cilo Swiss

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by unworthy1
saddle soap (as big block and Chas have alluded to) is for CLEANing dirty equestrian saddles and other leather goods that are dirty, too dirty to just wipe off or brush off. And other than basic soap (which you could ALSO employ on dirty leather goods, try a bar of Ivory for example) this product just "buffers" the soap with oils/fats like lanolin. So it's not a choice for conditioning and preserving the leather of a Brooks or similar "tensioned" bicycle saddle, but if yours is so filthy it needs soap to clean it, then use the Properts (or Kiwi or Fiebings) saddle soap with very little water, wipe it dry with a towel and allow it air-dry...then use Proofide (or the dubbin of your choice but Proofide is best)...sparingly.
Thank you for the advice. Much appreciated.
Hrvojeb is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 11:46 AM
  #14  
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 13,579

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Liked 5,178 Times in 2,355 Posts
Not disputing anything posted above, but saddle soap saved 2 old saddles I purchased for a song. Both were badly dried out. Brooks Swallow and Ideal (model unknown).
__________________
Vintage, modern, e-road. It is a big cycling universe.
Wildwood is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 01:34 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
brianinc-ville's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Greenville, NC
Posts: 1,390
Liked 59 Times in 42 Posts
How about the crucial question: what's least likely to leave a stain on your pants (U.S. usage of that last word )?

I love my Brookses, but as I ride to work in dress pants, I'm kind of afraid to put anything on them. Which stuff will best protect the leather without rubbing off on the rider?
brianinc-ville is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 02:14 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 810
Liked 159 Times in 80 Posts
ollo_ollo makes a salient point; don't kill the saddle with excessive treatment.

The link I gave earlier has Brooks advice

The primary function of Brooks Proofide is to nourish the leather to keep it supple and to prevent it from drying out with age. With this in mind, it is generally not necessary to apply Proofide to a new saddle. Instead, it is recommended to apply it after every 6 months.
Proofide should be applied sparingly to the upper surface of the leather using just enough to cover the entire upper surface area. This should then be left on the leather for several hours (perhaps overnight) in order to allow penetration through into the inner fibres, before buffing off thoroughly with a soft cloth.
Some Brooks saddle owners use Proofide for two further purposes:
a/ If the saddle is giving excessive discomfort after some time of use, then Proofide will soften the leather and hence encourage it to break-in more readily
b/ If riding regularly over wet surfaces (especially if you bicycle does not have mudguards), then a coating of Proofide applied and left onto the underside of the leather will offer some moisture shielding to the leather
HOWEVER, in both of these two cases, it is very important to be mindful of the irreversible damage that can result from excessive application of Proofide. There is a risk that the leather will over soften and then no longer be able to support the rider’s weight.
Proofide is a tried and trusted product, the ingredients of which are all known to Brooks. This is the only dressing, therefore, that we can endorse for use on a Brooks leather product. The use of any other product is frowned upon and will also jeopardize your warranty rights.
Since 2009, I have made my own leather saddle tops. So replacing one would be relatively straightforward and material costs are inexpensive.

but it can be time consuming (see https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...ecovering.html)

I do use beeswax after the Proofide to get a shine. But I suspect that the beeswax and the thicker leather I use contributes to a far longer break-in time than would be associated with a off the shelf Brooks.
But as I modify the shape of the cantleplate I get the shape I need to start with.
On the Classic Lightweights site there is an article on modifying Brooks saddles Brooks saddles - blocking and butchering!
Big Block is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 02:19 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 810
Liked 159 Times in 80 Posts
Originally Posted by brianinc-ville
How about the crucial question: what's least likely to leave a stain on your pants (U.S. usage of that last word )?

I love my Brookses, but as I ride to work in dress pants, I'm kind of afraid to put anything on them. Which stuff will best protect the leather without rubbing off on the rider?
Brooks advise:
HOW CAN I STOP THE COLOUR DYE FROM STAINING MY TROUSERS?
Brooks uses only natural vegetable-based dyes to achieve the colours of their leather products. These dyes will sometimes ‘bleed’ out during riding usage. This bleeding is more likely to occur when the saddle is new but, over a short period of time, the amount of bleeding will gradually reduce and should soon stop all together. Brooks advise the wearing of dark trousers, or shorts, during these initial rides. If the leather becomes wet, then bleeding may re-commence for a short while, this can also be true after Proofide has been applied.
Big Block is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 02:38 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
rootboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wherever
Posts: 16,748
Likes: 0
Liked 133 Times in 79 Posts
Originally Posted by repechage

Actually, wish the Brooks product was the same formula as 40 years ago.
Me too. It smelled good. And was a nice salmon pink color. I liked that.
rootboy is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 02:42 PM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
rootboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Wherever
Posts: 16,748
Likes: 0
Liked 133 Times in 79 Posts
I prefer the oil derived from the adrenal glands of ....

Ooops.

That got me banned once.
rootboy is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 06:14 PM
  #20  
Stop reading my posts!
 
unworthy1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 12,768
Liked 1,190 Times in 873 Posts
Originally Posted by Wildwood
Not disputing anything posted above, but saddle soap saved 2 old saddles I purchased for a song. Both were badly dried out. Brooks Swallow and Ideal (model unknown).
it was probably the water that saved your dried-out saddles, and probably not the small amount of lanolin or similar fat in the saddle soap and it sure was NOT the soap. I know this will sound like crazy-talk to most people, but Tony Coleridge (who is an authorized Brooks repair-ist in the UK, and may be one of 2 or 3 in the world) has written of dunking the entire dried out saddle in a bucket of water and then bringing it back from "the dead" with his careful applied technique. It's not for the novice but moisture (in the right time and place) is GOOD for leather, and in the wrong way it destroys leather.
unworthy1 is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 07:38 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 810
Liked 159 Times in 80 Posts
Once the fibres are damaged then water or any lubricant isn't going to bond them back together.
They may improve the cosmetic appearance for a wall hanger.

this is the full reply from Tony Colegrave to the Classic Rendezvous group
As I seem to have been drawn into this thread (by proxy, if you will), I feel that it's appropriate that I should try to correct one or two misapprehensions regarding my views on the matter under discussion, albeit somewhat late in the day. E-mail correspondence is, IMO, an unsatisfactory medium in which to express oneself in a lucid and precise manner, and one which tends to exacerbate the old trans-Atlantic 'two nations, divided ....' syndrome, but, as it seems that this stuff is archived (?verb) for posterity, I'll try to make myself plain(er). I don't think that soaking a saddle for longer than 24 hours will really enhance the process - overnight should be more than adequate. Longer soaking may initially improve the appearance of a 'badly cracked' saddle, but no amount of soaking will do anything to 'heal' these defects - if defects they are; most of us, especially if we're of a 'certain age' (only slightly older than most of the saddles that we're considering, in the main?), will have acquired a few cracks and creases of our own, but, although we're told that our living tissue can be 'repaired' to some extent that is not possible with dead animal skin, most (I hope) will prefer to see these 'defects' as conferring a degree of distinction. But, I digress...
The best 'treatment' for a badly cracked leather saddle, provided that it is stll structurally sound, is to ride it regularly, with love and the occasional light dressing of 'Proofide'. Most of these things have languished, unloved and neglected, for many years, and it can be surprising (sometimes, but not always) just how well they'll respond to a bit of TLC.
I think Jerry has mis-understood my comments about the leather 'tearing at the rivet holes' (which is where it usually occurs, of course). 'Abuse and overtightening' implies to me an active assault on the saddle, but I think that most of these things have been damaged simply by neglect; a leather saddle which has been kept in an unsuitable environment, often unused for many years, may well have 'lost it's nature', and the fibers (?American sp.) become brittle - once this has happened, nothing can feasibly be done to 'revive' it. Little mention has been made of my concomitant advice that, after soaking and assessing that it's probable that the saddle still has a life worth saving, it's nearly always important to cleanse the leather with saddle soap; I do this in mildly warm water and, having rinsed the resulting crud away, I rub more soap into the leather and leave it to dry - saddle soap these days seems to contain considerably more glycerine than domestic soaps, and this will probably provide all the 'essential oil' that the saddle needs. As regards drying, I certainly don't advise the use of excessive heat, but I'd think that 'in a dark room' is probably taking it too far the other way; ideally, you'll need a good flow of air in a warm-ish environment - say, by an open window, on a Summer's day and out of direct sunlight, and it should be ready to dress (lightly, and topside only, I'd suggest) with 'Proofide' within 24 hours. However, 'in a dark room' may well be a very suitable environment for maintaining any such saddle when it's not in use; what I'd suggest is ideal, is a slightly damp cellar, with good air-flow and constant mild temperature - certainly no central heating. Might not suit the rest of the bike, though. One thing that Jerry has most certainly mis-understood, is my opinion regarding the quality of the leather that Brooks are using for their current production.
It's quite true that concerns have been expressed regarding the raw material available to tanners these days, and it may well be that even the best finished product 'lacks substance' compared with that available in the past (as has been suggested to me recently, regarding the stuff that I'm using), but I'm quite convinced that the leather used by Brooks (especially that awful material that those poor devils in B'ham are having to use to make the so-called 'aged' models) is nothing like the best that is currently available. I have had conversations with the Italian management of the Company, but I don't think it appropriate that I should discuss these in this forum - even if I had the time, which I really don't have at present.
Tony Colegrave, Northiam, E.Sussex, U.K.

The purpose of the vegetable tanning process is to remove the water content from the leather using tannins.
For those with an interest, I suggest reading through the series of pages starting with this one.
Big Block is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 08:06 PM
  #22  
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,882

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Liked 1,392 Times in 876 Posts
I am currently using Proofide on the underside of my still-new Team Pro, to facilitate break-in. (I got the Pro it replaces for $5 in 1973, because the first owner gave up on it after one week of riding.)
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 11:16 PM
  #23  
Stop reading my posts!
 
unworthy1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 12,768
Liked 1,190 Times in 873 Posts
Originally Posted by Big Block
Once the fibres are damaged then water or any lubricant isn't going to bond them back together.
They may improve the cosmetic appearance for a wall hanger.

this is the full reply from Tony Colegrave to the Classic Rendezvous group



The purpose of the vegetable tanning process is to remove the water content from the leather using tannins.
For those with an interest, I suggest reading through the series of pages starting with this one.
well I stand corrected about both Tony C.s last name as well as the value of saddle soap...but he DOES soak saddles in a bucket of water for "no longer than 24 hours". Personally I am scared of trying it and hope I never neglect my Brooks or Ideales so that they become that dried out. In my local climate, leaving damp leather in the dark is an invitation for mold growth and that blue-greenish mold REALLY attacks the leather!
unworthy1 is offline  
Old 09-17-16, 11:47 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
 
Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Port Angeles, WA
Posts: 7,924

Bikes: A green one, "Ragleigh," or something.

Liked 636 Times in 358 Posts
Best thing is to just ride the saddle for about 500 miles, then take a look and see if you think it needs any goop or magic potions applied.

[/not overthinking things]
__________________
● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1973 Nishiki Semi-Pro ● 1979 Motobecane Grand Jubile ●1980 Apollo "Legnano" ● 1984 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1986 Merckx Super Corsa ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1988 Schwinn Voyageur ● 1989 Bottechia Team ADR replica ● 1990 Cannondale ST600 ● 1993 Technium RT600 ● 1996 Kona Lava Dome ●

Lascauxcaveman is offline  
Old 09-18-16, 01:08 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 810
Liked 159 Times in 80 Posts
Originally Posted by unworthy1
well I stand corrected about both Tony C.s last name as well as the value of saddle soap...but he DOES soak saddles in a bucket of water for "no longer than 24 hours". Personally I am scared of trying it and hope I never neglect my Brooks or Ideales so that they become that dried out. In my local climate, leaving damp leather in the dark is an invitation for mold growth and that blue-greenish mold REALLY attacks the leather!
I find that soaking in water for about an hour is sufficient to get (even the thickness of leather I use) it mouldable. As the water will take some time to dry out of the leather, and so will remain in contact with the inner fibres, I don't see the need to go that long.
Also I suggest that too long in the water may leech some of the tannins out, which is not desirable (I speculate there).

Rudi and I have had recent correspondence on this, and he may offer his experience.
Big Block is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.