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10 Speed Options- "Retro Roadie" Question

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10 Speed Options- "Retro Roadie" Question

Old 10-05-16, 02:25 PM
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10 Speed Options- "Retro Roadie" Question

I'm about to embark on my first "modernish" group build. I've acquired a new wheelset, 10 speed shifters, compatible derailleurs, and a 10 speed cassette and chain.

In the course of reading about this, I've seen that there's kind of a line between 9 speed and 10 speed. Where the 9 speed and lower components are more robust than the 10 speed. Seeing as how I'm used to 6 speeds anyway, I'm well OK with going to 9 speed instead of 10, but the shifters I have are too cool, and don't come in a 9 speed option. So then I've realized that 10 speed shifters should not work on their own with a 9 speed cassette- and that makes sense. However, on the Sheldon site, it specifically mentions using the "B Alternate Cable Routing" for using 10 speed shifters on a 9 speed cassette. Has anyone here had any experience with this method?

Shimano Dura-Ace Compatibility








Additionally, I've read about the Jtek Shiftmate (model #2) that changes the cable pull/derailleur actuation to account for a 9 speed cassette?

Does anyone have any real world experience with this?

Or should I just shut up and play with the 10 speed as it was sort of intended?


Thanks!
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Old 10-05-16, 02:27 PM
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Both systems are reliable provided they are maintained accordingly. I would just go with 10 speed as you already have the parts.
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Old 10-05-16, 02:28 PM
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I doubt that the 9 speed components are more robust than 10 speed, at least to any extent that would actually matter practically. I would just do 10 and avoid weird shifting workarounds.
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Old 10-05-16, 02:34 PM
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I don't know where you read that 9 speed is more robust, I would say that the exact opposite is true in my experience. Generally, better metals and treatments combined with better design means that newer system are smoother functioning and longer lasting than their predicessors. Everytime, they add another speed, the re-engineer the chain and claim it lasts longers. My experiences have born this out, I consistently get more miles out of my 10 speed chains than 9 or 8 and 11 speed seems to be holding up too.
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Old 10-05-16, 02:36 PM
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Many 9 speed components will be compatible with 10 speed components, with the exception of the shifter mechanism themselves. Campy does, however, allow changing some of the index gears.

However, I'd just go with 10s. There would be no reliability issue to duct tape a mixed system together, except for specific purposes such as mixing Campy and Shimano.
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Old 10-05-16, 05:22 PM
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Cool!

Thank you very much!
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Old 10-06-16, 05:47 PM
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I'd just run 10 and leave well enough alone. I honestly can't tell the difference between 9 and 10. I've probably mixed them unwittingly.
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