Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

A Pivotal Moment in Time

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

A Pivotal Moment in Time

Old 12-04-16, 08:12 PM
  #1  
LittleGinseng 
lurking nightrider
Thread Starter
 
LittleGinseng's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: NE Florida
Posts: 525

Bikes: '84 Lotus Supreme, '85 Club Fuji, '86 Schwinn Peloton, '87 DS Ironman Expert, '87 Maruishi Professional, '88 Takara

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 64 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 22 Posts
A Pivotal Moment in Time

When I was a spry young lad of 25, I attended a triathlon clinic at a local bike shop with a friend and co-worker of mine, Marie.

Marie was the up and coming triathlete. I was just a novice cyclist who loved to ride.

Marie told me that after the clinic there would be special discounts for attendees. As I was in need of a new bike (my Raleigh had recently been stolen) I jumped at the chance to score a new ride at a good price.

Long story short, I got to listen to John Howard discuss his life as a competitor in the Olympics and Ironman, I got to hang with Marie (who BTW was a hottie), and I purchased my Club Fuji, brand new off the showroom floor and at a great price.

It was this day in May, 1985 when it became clear I would always love anything having to do with bicycles.

Is there a particular moment in YOUR cycling experiences when the lore of two wheels came-a-calling for you?
__________________
"If there hadn't been women we'd still be squatting in a cave eating raw meat, because we made civilization in order to impress our girl friends. And they tolerated it and let us go ahead and play with our toys." Orson Welles
LittleGinseng is offline  
Old 12-04-16, 08:32 PM
  #2  
Wileyone 
Senior Member
 
Wileyone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: GWN
Posts: 2,517
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1811 Post(s)
Liked 563 Times in 384 Posts
In 1973 in Toronto at Bloor Cycle and saw my first Cinelli and Legnano race Bikes. I was hooked.
Wileyone is offline  
Old 12-04-16, 09:24 PM
  #3  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,029

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1503 Post(s)
Liked 407 Times in 316 Posts
Late '60s, when I saw my first PX-10s in the bike shop! Then it got worse when I saw a Mercian in Turin Bike Coop!
Road Fan is offline  
Old 12-04-16, 09:33 PM
  #4  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,401

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Mentioned: 186 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1212 Post(s)
Liked 489 Times in 192 Posts
When I bought my UO-8 at age 23.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 12-04-16, 10:50 PM
  #5  
obrentharris 
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Point Reyes Station, California
Posts: 3,871

Bikes: Indeed!

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1150 Post(s)
Liked 1,928 Times in 664 Posts
In 1965, at the age of 13, I cobbled together a 3-speed from a frame and parts found at the dump and from a few essential small parts bought from Vince's bike shop. (Vince, an emigrant from Italy, called everyone "cousin!") With two friends on 10-speeds I did my first 50-mile ride from the east side of the San Francisco peninsula over the range of hills that forms the spine of the peninsula, to the ocean, then up the coast and back over the spine to home. I don't think either of my friends ever rode bikes again. I was hooked.

In 1968 a new kid moved into our neighborhood from Sacramento. Mark Friedman and his whole family were into cycling. He lent me a set of toe clips and a set of "sew-up" wheels and tires to put on my Peugeot UO-8 for an 80-mile ride to a small town south of Santa Cruz. It was like flying after my steel-rimmed 60 psi clinchers. We had a lot of fine rides together. Mark died way too early: I think of him and miss him every time I ride on tubular tires. I'm sure those memories are part of why I still ride tubulars on a couple of my bikes.
obrentharris is offline  
Old 12-04-16, 11:12 PM
  #6  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 19,342

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 168 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5434 Post(s)
Liked 2,261 Times in 1,467 Posts
I bought a copy of Richard's bicycle book and learned how to fix my bike. I bought myself my first set of tool. I still own and use the metric wrenches that came with that tool kit. I took my bike apart and rebuilt it. I was hooked after that.
bikemig is offline  
Old 12-04-16, 11:20 PM
  #7  
gugie 
Bike Butcher of Portland
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 10,387

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 1145 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3911 Post(s)
Liked 3,196 Times in 1,438 Posts
Easy.

I had an American Eagle (pre-Nishiki) copy of a Schwinn Sting-Ray. We lived 15 miles from town, I just rode it over to see my friends. My sister came to visit with my brother-in-law, they had just purchased his and hers 10-speeds. I think they were Montgomerey Ward 27" steel rimmed, ashtabula crank 40 pounders. My sister asked if I wanted to try one out, of course I did. What seemed like just a few minutes later, I was 2 miles away from our house. I turned around and road back as fast as I could, feeling wind blowing in my hair for the first time on a bike.

The next day I started saving up for one of my own at a buck sixty an hour.
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.

Last edited by gugie; 12-04-16 at 11:37 PM.
gugie is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 01:07 AM
  #8  
Lascauxcaveman 
Senior Member
 
Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Port Angeles, WA
Posts: 7,909

Bikes: A green one, "Ragleigh," or something.

Mentioned: 189 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1586 Post(s)
Liked 502 Times in 294 Posts
For me: hasn't happened yet. I'm not so sure about this whole cycling thing, come to think of it. I mean, it s a lot of work; and for what?

Might take up crochet, or maybe weaving. Starting tomorrow. That way I get some good baskets or maybe scarves outta the deal.

__________________
● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1973 Nishiki Semi-Pro ● 1980 Apollo "Legnano" ● 1984 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1986 Merckx Super Corsa ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1988 Schwinn Voyageur ● 1989 Trek 400 ● 1989 Bottechia Team ADR replica ● 1990 Cannondale ST600 ● 1993 Technium RT600 ● 1996 Kona Lava Dome ●
Lascauxcaveman is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 01:16 AM
  #9  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 32,546

Bikes: 02 GTO, 2011 Magnum

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1195 Post(s)
Liked 871 Times in 425 Posts
When I was 11, me and the Huffy would pick up Blonds

__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"

10 Wheels is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 02:59 AM
  #10  
Dfrost 
Senior Member
 
Dfrost's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,881

Bikes: 87 Marinoni SLX Sports Tourer, 79 Miyata 912 by Gugificazione

Mentioned: 157 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 457 Post(s)
Liked 332 Times in 199 Posts
When I completed my first race in 1972 on a Raleigh Grand Sport.
Dfrost is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 06:44 AM
  #11  
daf1009
Senior Member
 
daf1009's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 3,178

Bikes: LESS than I did a year ago!

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
At about age 11, I saw my cousins' Schwinn Varsities...while I did not know at the time that this would start the affair with bikes...and it definitely took a few years off here and there...I look back to that time and realize it was when I feel in love with road bikes in particular (although arguing that a Varsity is a road bike, not a tank...well... :-)
daf1009 is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 06:46 AM
  #12  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,772

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 549 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1863 Post(s)
Liked 390 Times in 257 Posts
Nope. I can't think of any watershed moment, any kind of an epiphany. I have only the vaguest memory of my first bike. From my first "ten speed" (a used Raleigh Record in yellow, $100 in 1978) there was a slow climb toward newer and better bikes... until a few years ago when I realized that i didn't love my 17 lb aluminum and carbon fiber job any better than I'd loved that old Raleigh in its time.

The quest for the perfect bike continues. It's a process, not an event.
rhm is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 08:22 AM
  #13  
clubman 
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,129

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 118 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2052 Post(s)
Liked 1,363 Times in 887 Posts
At six years old I was already the master of my hood on my small Raleigh coaster bike when 10 year old Billy Kritzer talked me into peeling down the street with a firecracker in my spokes. When the cherry bomb blew the arse out of my pants pocket, I learned what a bully was. My nanny gave Billy a tanning he never forgot.
clubman is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 08:41 AM
  #14  
KonAaron Snake 
Fat Guy on a Little Bike
 
KonAaron Snake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 17,140

Bikes: Two wheeled ones

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1225 Post(s)
Liked 227 Times in 131 Posts
I was always unathletic and awkward; I didn't learn to ride a bike until I was 8 or 9. The learning process was not fun. Once I had it down, it was freedom. I could move quickly, go anywhere...I was in love. I also finally found something I was average, maybe even above average, at! I rode everywhere on my Raleigh BMX burner. I was hooked. Until, one day, it was stolen. THE HORROR.

I had less fun riding my dad's old Raleigh sport...which was at least 10 cm too big for me. I learned to hate IGH, steel rims and brakes that don't function. After a couple of years later my dad gave me a used lotus odyssey that was on some insane sale...this was when shops couldn't get rid of touring bikes. It was also far too large for me, but it shifted so smoothly, and pretty soon my radius went from 5-10 miles to 20+! I'd ride into philly, to new hope...anywhere and everywhere.

The vintage bug bit when my family was on their way to breakfast...we saw a beat up tandem out with the trash. I said it had three seats, my dad said no way, two. We bet a dollar, I won. We also walked it home and began restoring it. I had phone calls with Richard and Frank Schwinn about that bike...I met CR member Harvey Sachs, who gave us the parts from his (he was converting/up dating his to dura ace). I learned that chrome pitting doesn't really go away.

A friend with a de rosa signature and I started riding and he got me into the roadie "thing". I saved my Burger King dollars and bought a specialized Sirrus...and started "training". Did a few cat 4 races, poorly.

Last edited by KonAaron Snake; 12-05-16 at 08:47 AM.
KonAaron Snake is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 09:04 AM
  #15  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,383
Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2382 Post(s)
Liked 1,300 Times in 983 Posts
Christmas 1970.
Gifted a copy of The Complete Book of Bicycling by Sloane.
It was the textbook I did not know I needed. Started saving for a "10 speed". Because of this book I bypassed the typical bike ladder.
First road bike had Nervex Pro lugs, full 531, Ideale 90 saddle, TA cranks, Campagolo hubs and derailleurs, 3ttt bar and stem, tubulars. Two years later, more suitable bike for racing ( smaller) and full Campagnolo.
The book did make me aware of bike racing in the US as well, wanted to do that, finally lucked into a club in 1973.
repechage is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 09:14 AM
  #16  
bazil4696
Bike Doctor
 
bazil4696's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Southern Ontario
Posts: 141

Bikes: Norco Cape Cod tandem, KHS Tandemania Cross, 1952 Claud Butler ladyback tandem, 1971 & '73 Raleigh Suberbes, 1985 Gazelle Sport Solide, 1985 Rossi professional

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 24 Posts
Learning what Push steering was on my ten speed down the Jolly cut in Hamilton, Ontario.
(A steep escarpment route with a sweeping curve in the city)
bazil4696 is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 09:18 AM
  #17  
Wildwood
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 11,867

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 261 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3179 Post(s)
Liked 2,724 Times in 1,384 Posts
Originally Posted by LittleGinseng View Post
When I was a spry young lad of 25, I got to hang with Marie (who BTW was a hottie),
There were a couple of Maries.
I especially remember a redheaded Scottish lass, Glasgow, summer of 1969.
And the blonde in Palma de Mallorca, fall 1973.
And.... oh never mind.

the bikes, they just sorta felt right, from the beginning, back in the 50s, balloon tired singlespeeds.

Last edited by Wildwood; 12-05-16 at 09:23 AM.
Wildwood is online now  
Old 12-05-16, 09:20 AM
  #18  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,005

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1164 Post(s)
Liked 704 Times in 495 Posts
Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
I was always unathletic and awkward; I didn't learn to ride a bike until I was 8 or 9. The learning process was not fun. Once I had it down, it was freedom. I could move quickly, go anywhere...I was in love. ...
My story is eerily similar -- I learned to balance a bicycle at age 12, bought a "middleweight" Schwinn 2-speed from a friend for $15, and I was hooked. Six months later I asked for an entry level 10-speed for Christmas and got a new 1962 Bianchi Corsa. My 2:18 double century in 1972 on my American Eagle Semi-Pro (upgraded to tubular tires and closer-ratio gearing) remains my one big athletic accomplishment.

I love the freedom of environmentally responsible, economical, flexible transportation; the art of collecting, repairing, and upgrading classic bicycles; the camaraderie, with long-term cycling friends or casual chance meetings on the road or trail. I am still unathletic and awkward, but I am in better health than most other 66-year-olds I meet.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

Last edited by John E; 12-05-16 at 09:23 AM.
John E is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 09:21 AM
  #19  
ldmataya 
Senior Member
 
ldmataya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mt. Horeb, Wisconsin
Posts: 512
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
A smart-ass older brother walked in on our group and informed us that our Roadmasters, Huffys, Monarks and Free Spirits were nothing but left-over, crudely welded, outdoor furniture pipe. In order to reach his level of sophistication we needed to appreciate and understand lugged bicycle frames, and then perhaps one day we could afford one. So I did. Thanks Roger G.
ldmataya is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 09:39 AM
  #20  
romperrr 
Pedal to the medal
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: The Arsenal of Democracy
Posts: 1,107

Bikes: 1991 Team Miyata Track, 1992 Lemond Alpe d'Huez, 19?? Schwinn High Serra, 1982 Trek 614, 198X Raleigh Alyeska

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 48 Posts
Oh man! Good question. As a small child, I biked around my neighborhood with friends but soon lost interest when I started driving. I regained my love for bikes in college.

For me it was probably when my cousin got a used Schwinn Continental around 2009. We were both in college and living together at the time. It was the first time I rode a bike with drop bar and I felt supremely cool. After he moved out, I searched for my own drop bar bike and found an attractive Raleigh Technium; however, the seller sold it one hour before our agreed upon meeting time.

Disheartened, I walked home. Not twenty minutes later, my cousin calls and asks if I've ever heard of Peugeot. I told him to my limited knowledge, they are well regarded bikes and he quickly hung up only to come riding down the street on a Peugeot P6. He gave it to me as a gift. That was my first "real" bike. A few years later, I gave the frame and some parts to a friend who had fallen on hard times, after it had gone through several iterations. I was on a Miyata 1000 at the time.
romperrr is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 09:43 AM
  #21  
Bikerider007 
Senior Member
 
Bikerider007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: AZ
Posts: 2,457

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 459 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 28 Posts
I can't recall an exact moment, but was around age 10 (80'). I fell in love with Diamondback and Mongoose bikes. Prior to that it was Murray from Western Auto or somewhere. These were a different level of quality and had a gusset with a cutout, the diamond or circle. Ooohh

From there it was DG-DG in gusset, GT-love that stamp on rear oversize tubing. Then aluminum came into my sights! PK Ripper/JMC-bikes could be lifted with one finger. Wow! And on and on.... Visions of anodized and chromoly sugar plums danced in my head at this time of year. Parts swirling around like a snow from a drift (or dust devil in AZ )

At that time all the older guys had their 10/12 speeds. So I got my first road bike at 11 or 12 (in my avatar) but mostly ended up sticking with bmx for many more years.

And I'm still enamored by bikes with cutouts in lugs, cool parts etc. So here I am.

@10 Wheels love that pic!

Last edited by Bikerider007; 12-05-16 at 09:49 AM.
Bikerider007 is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 09:47 AM
  #22  
KonAaron Snake 
Fat Guy on a Little Bike
 
KonAaron Snake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 17,140

Bikes: Two wheeled ones

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1225 Post(s)
Liked 227 Times in 131 Posts
Originally Posted by John E View Post
My story is eerily similar -- I learned to balance a bicycle at age 12, bought a "middleweight" Schwinn 2-speed from a friend for $15, and I was hooked. Six months later I asked for an entry level 10-speed for Christmas and got a new 1962 Bianchi Corsa. My 2:18 double century in 1972 on my American Eagle Semi-Pro (upgraded to tubular tires and closer-ratio gearing) remains my one big athletic accomplishment.

I love the freedom of environmentally responsible, economical, flexible transportation; the art of collecting, repairing, and upgrading classic bicycles; the camaraderie, with long-term cycling friends or casual chance meetings on the road or trail. I am still unathletic and awkward, but I am in better health than most other 66-year-olds I meet.
I remember my first century...it was on a specialized Sirrus with the original god awful plastic Vetta saddle. By the end of the ride, I was in such pain...and a guy I was with told me about Brooks saddles. I looked at it...and thought what a piece of old leather crap...he insisted I try one and gave me an old one of his, an old Brooks Pro. Bugger was right! I got laughed at for using such a crude, heavy old saddle...but my arse didn't hurt as much on longer rides anymore, and that was good enough for me.
KonAaron Snake is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 10:02 AM
  #23  
ollo_ollo
Senior Member
 
ollo_ollo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Soviet of Oregon or the NW Florida Redoubt
Posts: 5,180

Bikes: Still have a few left!

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 417 Post(s)
Liked 262 Times in 159 Posts
That would be the late 1940's when we moved from rural Nebraska to the beach area of Los Angeles. I had only ridden a tricycle until then. After mastering riding a straight line without falling over, the first time I leaned into a turn and felt the now familiar, magical swoop as the bike miraculously circled around without falling over! I was hooked for life. Don
ollo_ollo is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 10:25 AM
  #24  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,383
Mentioned: 113 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2382 Post(s)
Liked 1,300 Times in 983 Posts
Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
I was always unathletic and awkward; I didn't learn to ride a bike until I was 8 or 9. The learning process was not fun. Once I had it down, it was freedom. I could move quickly, go anywhere...I was in love. I also finally found something I was average, maybe even above average, at!
I was almost useless as a ball player of any sort.
Neighbor's Mom was the one to get me on two wheels at 6.
Yes, the Bicycle was escape. Vastly expanded horizons.
I had about a 4 mile radius of free roaming by 9. About as far as a Sting-Ray was useable.
Racing was a tough nut to crack. Learning that I was going to have to buy black cycling shorts and white socks, and what was called a helmet at the time. Expensive for a kid who made his bike money repairing neighbors bikes and washing cars for under a dollar each.
Then the realization that due to my age I was gear limited, the Max gear I could use was under what I typically rode on flat terrain! First half of '73 got dropped straight off. By the end of the season I could ride the next category up and hang in but nothing in the sprint. '74 brought that turning point, with about 8 weeks of coaching help, figuring out one needed a race plan before the race started. Placing, then winning.
repechage is offline  
Old 12-05-16, 10:26 AM
  #25  
bulldog1935
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
Posts: 2,717

Bikes: '74 Raleigh International utility; '98 Moser Forma road; '92 Viner Pro CX upright

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 939 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I grew up in hills, and I grew up on derailleur bikes. Had a Sears The Rail with 5sp and top tube stick shift.
It was freedom to a kid to climb the hills and visit friends, and take off into town to visit the hobby shop. I'm still amazed at the size of the hill I had to climb home from Junior high.
Later a Wards Open Road 10 sp. It went to school with me in Nashville, but college campus opened my eyes to bike boom and especially European bikes - The first bike I saw without an Ashtabula crank looked like business to me
The most beautiful and unobtainable bike I had ever seen was the black and gold Raleigh Competition GS

In fall '76 the new Raleighs arrived and Grand Prix was equipped with SunTour. That pretty much sealed it for me - the shop swapped out the metal-pan saddle for a suede Unicanitor.
bulldog1935 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.