Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Bicycle Co-op parts organization Tips and Tricks

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Bicycle Co-op parts organization Tips and Tricks

Old 04-30-17, 03:26 PM
  #1  
OTS 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Bloomington/Normal IL
Posts: 876
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 38 Posts
Bicycle Co-op parts organization Tips and Tricks

Our town is finally getting a bicycle co-op.

I have volunteered to help with the parts and shop set up.

I know some of you frequent your local co-op for vintage parts or have past experience working in bike shops.

Please, can you share with me some of the great/ingenious ways you have seen parts organized?

Some questions have come up:

What is the best way to display and quickly identify different speed chain?

Would a small sample of 5/6/7/8 speed, same with 9 and 10 speed chain help identify it quickly?

What about spokes.........best to organize them by length and then gauge or ?

Any other organizational tips and tricks to help would be most appreciated and of course I am a mostly visual learner, so pics if you got'em.

Thanks in advance,

Rick
OTS is offline  
Old 04-30-17, 04:16 PM
  #2  
zukahn1 
Senior Member
 
zukahn1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Fairplay Co
Posts: 8,174

Bikes: Current 79 Nishiki Custum Sport, Jeunet 620, notable previous bikes P.K. Ripper loop tail, Kawahara Laser Lite, Paramount Track full chrome, Raliegh Internatioanl, Motobecan Super Mirage. 59 Crown royak 3 speed

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 480 Post(s)
Liked 285 Times in 176 Posts
One thing I would suggest to start is you get nice large tool box with a lock from harbor freight to put your higher value specialty tools in and keep it somewhat separated from the rest of the stuff so a senior volunteer or mechanic has to get theses and just not leave them out. I will actually say from experience this as much for preventing tool and bike damage from misuse as it is from theft.
zukahn1 is offline  
Old 04-30-17, 04:21 PM
  #3  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,588

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 277 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21043 Post(s)
Liked 3,970 Times in 2,907 Posts
.
...honestly, in a bike co-op environment you're probably miles ahead by not saving chains. The drawer or bin you save them in always ends up full of stuff that should have been thrown away when removed from the bike because it's worn out.

Our co-op started out with old two drawer file cabinets as parts bins. They don't work very well, but are cheap and better than nothing. I built a handlebar rack and mounted it on top of one of the cabinets. It works reasonably well, made from PVC in a larger diameter and some metal floor flanges from Home Depot.

The best I could come up with for parts/components was regular plastic warehouse storage bins (the industrial quality ones, which are not cheap but take a beating and still work) installed on shelves under the work benches. I don't have any photos, but the bins can be found in various colors in all the industrial supply catalogs and look like these from U-line.

They even sell them on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/slp/plastic-p...k36be8gec7u7uu
Don't stack them. Install them to slide out on shelving.
3alarmer is online now  
Old 04-30-17, 04:21 PM
  #4  
nesteel 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Midwest
Posts: 2,049

Bikes: See the signature....

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 506 Post(s)
Liked 100 Times in 71 Posts
Whatever plan/method you come up with/decide to use, stick with it. Appoint someone to "ride herd" on the shop, and keep volunteers and customers to stick with the organizational method. Otherwise you end up wasting your time "herding cats" and cleaning up after people who could care less what sort of mess they make.
__________________
My bikes: '81 Trek 957, '83 Trek 720, '85 Trek 500, '85 Trek 770, '81 Merckx, '85 Centurion Cinelli, '85 Raleigh Portage, '92 RB-2, '09 Bianchi
nesteel is offline  
Old 04-30-17, 04:22 PM
  #5  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,588

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 277 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21043 Post(s)
Liked 3,970 Times in 2,907 Posts
Originally Posted by zukahn1 View Post
One thing I would suggest to start is you get nice large tool box with a lock from harbor freight to put your higher value specialty tools in and keep it somewhat separated from the rest of the stuff so a senior volunteer or mechanic has to get theses and just not leave them out. I will actually say from experience this as much for preventing tool and bike damage from misuse as it is from theft.
...+1. We finally ended up doing that too. While we're talking about it, you need someone who understands what's broke, and what is suitable for re-use, as opposed to what's broke and is landfill. Otherwise your storage space quickly ends up full of crap that should be thrown away.

This hypothetical person needs to be knowledgeable enough to not throw away good, usable stuff (like the person who tossed our chainring bolt collection once ), but smart enough to quickly assess and toss the stuff that needs tossing.

Last edited by 3alarmer; 04-30-17 at 04:28 PM.
3alarmer is online now  
Old 04-30-17, 04:43 PM
  #6  
Slash5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Southern Ontario
Posts: 1,891
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 261 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
The local co-op has milk crates on shelves with pedals, front derailleurs, rear derailleurs, seat posts, freewheels etc to each crate.
A small bucket gets junk derailleurs and such that could be used for spare parts.
Big recycle type bins have saddles, used tires. New tires, wheels and rims are racked on tubing.
They have one of those metal racks with small bins for small parts like headsets etc.
Spokes are sorted by length in a pigeon hole type rack. They only carry one gauge of spoke. Odd spokes go in a tin can, if more than one, wrapped in tape and labeled.
Slash5 is offline  
Old 04-30-17, 05:27 PM
  #7  
OTS 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Bloomington/Normal IL
Posts: 876
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 38 Posts
@zukahn1
@nesteel
@3alarmer
@Slash5
Thanks for sharing these ideas, much appreciated.
All things I haven't thought of.
I will be sure to share these.

Keep'em coming
OTS is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 07:08 AM
  #8  
GordoTrek
Senior Member
 
GordoTrek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,342

Bikes: 1962 Carlton Franco-Suisse Custom,1968 Raleigh DL-1/Tourist, 1971 Holdsworth Professional, 1973 Holdsworth Mistral,1973 Raleigh Gran Sport,1974 Raleigh Grand Prix, 1993 Trek 2200 Composite, 2011 Trek 7.3FX

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
our coop has a big spring that is stretched out and anchored on both ends. Its then used to store brake cables and shifter cables. Just fit the head into the spring and let the cable dangle below. Makes it really easy to retrieve used cables but also keeps em snug and organized. Some shop mechanic thought of that one. Had to be the most original idea i've seen in a while. Hang hooks for wheels everywhere, attempt to organize by size, and keep pairs of wheels together. Develop a plan for keep or strip and recycle. Find a local scrapper and see if they can stop by a few times a week to take scrap parts.

Find a bike shop to work with to buy tools from at cost. That way you can replace broken/worn out tools cheaper than most.
GordoTrek is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 07:42 AM
  #9  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,588

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 277 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21043 Post(s)
Liked 3,970 Times in 2,907 Posts
.
...I forgot about zip ties to keep paired parts like brakes, brake levers, pedals, etc together, rather than just tossing them in a bin unpaired. If you just use string or wire ties, people will separate them, but for some reason they stay together better with zip ties.

Keep a few single pedals to strip for parts over off by themselves somewhere.
3alarmer is online now  
Old 05-01-17, 07:58 AM
  #10  
Fahrenheit531 
Funnier in Person
 
Fahrenheit531's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 3,848

Bikes: Schwinn Volare ('78); Raleigh Competition GS ('79)

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 680 Post(s)
Liked 405 Times in 218 Posts
Our co-op uses the "bin method," with each category of item (RD, FD, brake caliper, etc) piled into its own milk crate toward the back of the co-op in the parts section. These are the worn, beat, well-used components, and are available for all to dig through as needed. The nicer (more pricey) items each have a smaller bin up near the counter. And as mentioned above, specialty tools are kept behind the counter, handed out for use on request. Rims and tires hang on long racks along the back wall, organized by size (26, 27, 700c).

As a customer this works for me. I know generally where things can be found, but I still get the thrill of the hunt as I dig my way through 100+ derailleurs looking for the one I want. The way the tires are set up, on the other hand, is sort of a PITA... the one I want is always way in the back and I've got to fight it through 40 other tires to pull it from the rack.

I guess my point, again as a customer, is don't drive yourself crazy on this. General organization is sufficient, while separation by brand, or long cage/short cage, or whatever will only make things more difficult for you.
__________________
A race bike in any era is a highly personal choice that at its "best" balances the requirements of fit, weight, handling, durability and cost tempered by the willingness to toss it and oneself down the pavement at considerable speed. ~Bandera
Fahrenheit531 is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 08:02 AM
  #11  
gugie 
Dilberteur at large
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,189

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 1008 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3252 Post(s)
Liked 1,539 Times in 791 Posts
This is a good question for new member @NickFavicchio, as he manages one in Port Townsend, WA.
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is online now  
Old 05-01-17, 08:11 AM
  #12  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,588

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 277 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21043 Post(s)
Liked 3,970 Times in 2,907 Posts
.
...it's pointless to save headsets unless whoever pulls them pulls off all the parts (including the crown race and both tube races) and zip ties all of the parts together.
3alarmer is online now  
Old 05-01-17, 08:55 AM
  #13  
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 14,340
Mentioned: 349 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2241 Post(s)
Liked 1,898 Times in 958 Posts
Originally Posted by J.Oxley View Post
I know generally where things can be found, but I still get the thrill of the hunt as I dig my way through 100+ derailleurs looking for the one I want. The way the tires are set up, on the other hand, is sort of a PITA... the one I want is always way in the back and I've got to fight it through 40 other tires to pull it from the rack.
That pretty much describes my basement! Hah!
nlerner is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 09:14 AM
  #14  
zukahn1 
Senior Member
 
zukahn1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Fairplay Co
Posts: 8,174

Bikes: Current 79 Nishiki Custum Sport, Jeunet 620, notable previous bikes P.K. Ripper loop tail, Kawahara Laser Lite, Paramount Track full chrome, Raliegh Internatioanl, Motobecan Super Mirage. 59 Crown royak 3 speed

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 480 Post(s)
Liked 285 Times in 176 Posts
Here is an inspiring but not practical way to organize or use old chains the chaindaler from the no defunct Denver bike pit.
zukahn1 is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 09:14 AM
  #15  
corrado33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,094

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1129 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by J.Oxley View Post
Our co-op uses the "bin method," with each category of item (RD, FD, brake caliper, etc) piled into its own milk crate toward the back of the co-op in the parts section. These are the worn, beat, well-used components, and are available for all to dig through as needed. The nicer (more pricey) items each have a smaller bin up near the counter. And as mentioned above, specialty tools are kept behind the counter, handed out for use on request. Rims and tires hang on long racks along the back wall, organized by size (26, 27, 700c).

As a customer this works for me. I know generally where things can be found, but I still get the thrill of the hunt as I dig my way through 100+ derailleurs looking for the one I want. The way the tires are set up, on the other hand, is sort of a PITA... the one I want is always way in the back and I've got to fight it through 40 other tires to pull it from the rack.

I guess my point, again as a customer, is don't drive yourself crazy on this. General organization is sufficient, while separation by brand, or long cage/short cage, or whatever will only make things more difficult for you.
This is typically how we have our COOP set up. Milk crates (lined with cardboard) are filled with parts and then put on large shelves in the back of the shop. Similar parts are kept together (derailleurs are all in one "aisle", all brake parts are on the other side of the aisle, all seat posts are next to each other.

A couple of things to think about.
  • Front derailleurs come in many varieties (like top pull, bottom pull w/cable housing stop, and bottom pull w/o cable housing stop)
  • Rear derailleurs come in two main varieties, old style (with the claw) and new style. Then each of those styles have long and short cage varieties.
  • Seatposts are a pain in the ass to organize. If you measure them all when you get them, that'd be great, otherwise they end up a mess.
  • Don't bother organizing chains. We RARELY see a 9 speed chain in our coop, (let alone a 10 or an 11). The main thing is to keep all of the old classic 10 speed chains (if they're not stretched), as they're a bit special sometimes.

The best way to store tires is also the LEAST accessible. (Hang them on a rod essentially.) It's the way we do it. If someone wants to dig through it, let them. We also organize the tires by size (26, 26x1 3/8, 700c, 27, 29er). Remember that there are multiple versions (bead seat diameters) of 26 x 1 3/8 and of 27s.

We hang rims and frames by the ceiling. When the rim gets trued and the bearings adjusted, we tag it with a wheel tag and price it. Non tagged wheels can be bought, but we make no guarantee they'll be any good.

We have a toolbox in the back of the shop that is for "staff" only. (Or volunteers who have been around for a while.) It's one of those fancy "locking" toolboxes that have levers you have to pull under the drawer lip to open the drawer. It thwarts most people trying to open it and everyone who knows how can open it easily. (We got it donated (scratch and dent) from costco. We also get all of their returned bikes, may want to ask them about that.)

I can take pictures of our coop if you'd like.

EDIT: This seems to be a relatively "large" operation. If so, you may want to contact QBP about becoming a partner (or whatever it's called.) Our coop orders from them for tools, any bike parts we need (mostly housing and cables/chains) and other things as well. I think we have something of a "non compete" clause with the local bike shops in town though. We're not allowed to sell any new parts that they stock cheaper than them. Of course, no one enforces it, but we wouldn't want to break that trust. They often donate stuff to us.

Also, nothing NEW is left out to the public. It's unfortunate, but people WILL steal from you. Anything that's new is either in the display case up front or in the back room (staff only.)

Also, "premium" parts are priced and set apart from everything else. (And I'm talking either NOS stuff, or high end Dura Ace/Campy stuff that's in good condition.) With that said, we almost never sell anything out of the front case. It's not what people come in to look for. If it's not in great condition, it stays with the rest of the normal stuff, as it gives people something to come in and look for.

We also donate stretched chains and worn freewheels/cassettes to local artists.

Last edited by corrado33; 05-01-17 at 09:24 AM.
corrado33 is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 09:17 AM
  #16  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 7,843

Bikes: '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '88 De Rosa Pro, '90 De Rosa Professional, '91 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1018 Post(s)
Liked 672 Times in 418 Posts
The one I visit is well organized not only with small parts but size of bins based on part.

He has a very tall ceiling so hangs frames and wheels from above. A good way to hang is to use a long pole found at Lowes or HD and put a hook on the end of it.

Low end stuff is open for searching by the customers but more quality items are in a glass presentation case/counter.

He has 3-4 truing stands in one spot with a cubby below with spokes. three work stands in the middle.

Used bikes are displayed outside during work hours with a couple in the window that are upper end and some in front of the display case, if there isn't room anywhere else.

Clothing is all in one spot as are forks which are separated by suspension or fixed.

Zip ties are a good idea and often are easier to use than alternatives like plastic bags. Adjusters should have the "nut" removed, the adjuster put into the caliper and the "nut" screwed on the adjuster so the assembly isn't lost. For some crazy reason, small parts are not as valued as the main part which results in the value dropping significantly because of missing pieces. Hangers for center pulls is another often ignored set of small parts.

Throwing parts into bins often damages parts. I don't have a solution for that except don't clean them. Let the dirt and grease buffer the impacts!
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 09:55 AM
  #17  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 7,492

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) '82 nishiski,

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1342 Post(s)
Liked 626 Times in 440 Posts
a tire tree is handy for tires/tubes Think a 4x4 with a solid base (2x6s ). put 3/4 or 1 inch dowels branches (at slight up angle) at several levels at each sided of the tree. bigger tires toward the bottom. it lets you sort and access easily.

also stock up on cheapy friction thumbsifters..... for all the gripshifts that die.
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
squirtdad is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 10:13 AM
  #18  
NickFavicchio 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Port Townsend, WA
Posts: 55
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
That's me! I'm the shop manager for the Port Townsend Recyclery.

www.ptrecylery.org

The organization does a lot beyond the shop but we get ~300 bikes or so a year and we sell a LOT of used stuff, in addition to selling ~200 refurbished bikes a year.

Organization is big part of my job. The founder of the organization - not big on organization, so clawing the place into a functional shape that stays clean/tidy/functional in the midst of rampaging middle school kids has been a big part of my life for the past year and change.

Pictures really do say everything and BF doesn't want me to post urls until I have 10 posts, so pictures coming soon I guess .

Smallish Tupperware bins with multi colored labels for all the used components and accessories. Don't save chains as already mentioned. And only keep cassettes and freewheels coming off of bikes with chains that were checked with a chain stretch tool.

I'm alone in the shop Tuesday Wednesday but I'll make a note to take some pictures for ya'll.
NickFavicchio is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 08:27 PM
  #19  
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Posts: 9,539
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 676 Post(s)
Liked 311 Times in 205 Posts
Surfing around the Community Cycling Center site turned up this: Parts & Accessories - Community Cycling Center The CCC is a good model for what a bike co-op should be. I've helped them out a couple times by donating time and materials, especially with their Christmas bike giveaway.

In addition to the new parts and accessories, there's a large number of buckets devoted to used parts: derailleurs, hubs, brakes, etc. Really good/popular stuff (Campagnolo, SunTour bar-cons) are kept in a glass case.

__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 09:11 PM
  #20  
gerv 
In the right lane
 
gerv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Des Moines
Posts: 9,565

Bikes: 1974 Huffy 3 speed

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
.
...I forgot about zip ties to keep paired parts like brakes, brake levers, pedals, etc together, rather than just tossing them in a bin unpaired. If you just use string or wire ties, people will separate them, but for some reason they stay together better with zip ties.

Keep a few single pedals to strip for parts over off by themselves somewhere.
Couple of ideas from my co-op experience:
- instead of zip ties, keep sharp scissors and re-purpose those tubes that cannot be patched. Just cut the in 12 inch strips. If you need something finer you can cut them down their length, say for lashing pedals together.
- keep some good tape around to keep the bolts for your v-brakes in the brakes, rather than dumping bolt-less brakes into the bin (and then storing the bolts somewhere where they'll never be recovered.
- bend up some spokes and use them to hang rim strips.
gerv is offline  
Old 05-02-17, 08:41 AM
  #21  
corrado33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,094

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1129 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post

That's a coop? Jeebus. Ours looks like a dump comparatively.

I prefer the "welcoming" coops that are just a garage and people walk in to start working on things.
corrado33 is offline  
Old 05-02-17, 10:34 AM
  #22  
clasher
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,602
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Liked 53 Times in 44 Posts
We sort spokes by material type and length. Cardboard tubes cut down into 12" lengths all stacked and label on a shelf can make a quick rack for cheap. Most of the spokes at the local co-op aren't butted but anytime they are found they are tied together with an elastic and labelled. Stainless spokes have their own shelf since we sell them for more money.

Checking chains against a 1/8" sprocket can be a quick way to separate 3/32" chains out of a pile of mixed chains. That's the amount of sorting the local co-op does since most of the 3/32" show a lot of wear and they are all sold for a dollar. Volunteers stripping bikes are shown how to use the chain checker to measure chains and really worn chains are tossed for scrap metal. Chains are just kept in a shallow bin... anything 9/10 speed worth selling is usually tossed in a ziploc bag and marked for the display case, not very common to get good chains in those speeds for us. If the co-op is just starting up you'll probably want a source cheap basic new chains but I would still save chains, especially for stuff like kid's bikes. The local co-op gives 'em away for free so there's no logic that really justifies putting 5$ of new parts on a bike that we give away.

If you have the room for metal shelving I would check out craigslist and surplus auctions for industrial racks and parts bins, the co-op has old metal bins like these for all the small parts. Stuff like this might even be found for free if you happen to have factories closing or renovating. Large stores sometime throw away all kinds of merchandising racks that can be useful as well or hacked apart into different things.

Starting up from scratch will probably mean saving more parts than an established co-op would. If you don't have bolt cutters already I would get some, they are handy for cutting apart wheels quickly. Separating the scrap aluminum from the steel can make a few extra bucks for the co-op. If you cut out the pinned joints in the rims they are usually just pure extrusions so they fetch the highest price at the scrap yard. Clean cast and stuff with steel/brass go into different bins too.
clasher is offline  
Old 05-02-17, 11:11 AM
  #23  
SloButWide 
Heck on Wheels
 
SloButWide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: USA Midwest
Posts: 1,100

Bikes: In Signature

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Third Hand coop stores bikes to be worked and frames to be saved in a loft. This forces people to decide that a bike is worth carrying upstairs, vs parting out and hauling to the "to be recycled" pile near the back door.

Tires and tubes are sorted by size and stored hanging on 2x4s extending from the wall. Hang a pair of chains on the wall - one for shifting inner cables, one for brake cables. Put a 5 gallon bucket or a 12" section of 4" PVC to store the housings below the chains.

Bikes are stored along a wall in a two level rack similar to what the LBS use. The front half of the rack (near the entrance) is "ready to go", with prices. In the shop half, there are three sections: next up, being worked, and final checkout. Bikes move from Triage to "next up" (or sometimes final checkout for bikes that are donated in near new condition). When a bike goes from next up to being worked, they get tagged with the work needed. Items are crossed off the list as completed. When done, they go to final checkout, where a coordinator (think shop foreman) runs through a checklist and prices the bike. There are usually two coordinators working a session - one overseeing retail and volunteer check-in, and one overseeing the shop area.
__________________
"I had a great ride this morning, except for that part about winding up at work."

Bikes so far: 2011 Felt Z85, 80's Raleigh Sovereign (USA), 91 Bianchi Peregrine, 91 Austro-Daimler Pathfinder, 90's Trek 730 Multitrack, STOLEN: 80 Schwinn Voyageur (Japan)

SloButWide is offline  
Old 05-02-17, 09:10 PM
  #24  
Roll-Monroe-Co
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,308
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
.
...it's pointless to save headsets unless whoever pulls them pulls off all the parts (including the crown race and both tube races) and zip ties all of the parts together.
amen brother
Roll-Monroe-Co is offline  
Old 05-02-17, 10:56 PM
  #25  
Steve Whitlatch 
Senior Member
 
Steve Whitlatch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 3,672
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 540 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 29 Posts
Sounds like you folks have nice coops. I happened to deliver some new bikes to a bike shop in Chicago. I asked the owner where the Co-op was around there that I had heard about? He told I was in it. He said they were not for profit bike shop. I looked at the prices on his inventory of used bikes and scratched my head. Asking more than CL prices?

I proceeded to tell him that I was looking for a specific set of brake levers and asked if I could look through his bins? He told me I would need to go there on Tuesday or Saturday night and that I would need to bring the bike with me?
I then asked if he takes donations on frames and parts that I have to give? He told me yes and that I could bring them anytime?

He is not getting anything from me. LOL
__________________
My bikes: 1970`s Roberts - 1981 Miyata 912 - 1980`s Ocshner (Chrome) - 1987 Schwinn Circuit - 1987 Schwinn Prologue - 1992 Schwinn Crosspoint - 1999 Schwinn Circuit - 2014 Cannondale Super Six EVO
Steve Whitlatch is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.