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how the heck do i do this?

Old 05-15-17, 05:09 AM
  #1  
reissue59
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how the heck do i do this?

So, i got Rossin repainted By Marinoni, as usually, great job.
I want to highlight the panto on the seatstays,but:
Lettering is raised not recessed. Tried few methods but I got crap results. I'm using testor so I can take it off.
Any ideas?
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Old 05-15-17, 05:40 AM
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I assume you are using a brush? If so, it sounds like your brush is too wet. After loading the brush with paint, dab it several times on a paper towel to remove the excess. When applying to the raised lettering you may not get complete fill, so it may take several applications, however the relatively dry brush will prevent the paint from flowing off the raised lettering you are painting. The technique is called drybrushing and it takes a bit of practice to get the right amount of paint left on the brush.

Alternately, you can cut a apply the paint to an absorbent, relatively rigid material, like boxboard from a cereal carton, then use it like a stamp to transfer the paint to the raised lettering. Don't flood the stamp with paint, use just enough to get complete coverage. It has to wet enough to transfer to the raised lettering but not so wet that it will flow once transferred. Again, it may take a bit of practice to load the correct amount of paint onto your stamp.

Good luck.
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Old 05-15-17, 08:11 AM
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^if that doesn't work, try patience and a toothpick.
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Old 05-15-17, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
I assume you are using a brush? If so, it sounds like your brush is too wet. After loading the brush with paint, dab it several times on a paper towel to remove the excess. When applying to the raised lettering you may not get complete fill, so it may take several applications, however the relatively dry brush will prevent the paint from flowing off the raised lettering you are painting. The technique is called drybrushing and it takes a bit of practice to get the right amount of paint left on the brush.

Alternately, you can cut a apply the paint to an absorbent, relatively rigid material, like boxboard from a cereal carton, then use it like a stamp to transfer the paint to the raised lettering. Don't flood the stamp with paint, use just enough to get complete coverage. It has to wet enough to transfer to the raised lettering but not so wet that it will flow once transferred. Again, it may take a bit of practice to load the correct amount of paint onto your stamp.

Good luck.
I was also thinking of something like the second method. I would probably use a small piece of linoleum or hard rubber. Something slightly rigid is probably best, as you don't want it to conform to the shape you're applying the paint to. Just put a thin layer of paint on the linoleum piece, and then apply gently and directly, without any side-to-side movement. Fix any missed areas with a very fine brush.

EDIT: You might also get a small roller with a handle at the craft store. Roll it in a dab of paint to get an even layer on the roller, and then gently roll it over the raised lettering. You can easily wipe off any areas where you roll too far.
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Old 05-15-17, 08:27 AM
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Put a light coat of paint on a piec of foil. Hold foil, taught, and gently press onto the raised part.

If you use a brush I suggest a straight edged, stiff bristle brush. To to any drugstore and go to the cosmetics department and find one inexpensively.
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Old 05-15-17, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Kevindale View Post
I was also thinking of something like the second method. I would probably use a small piece of linoleum or hard rubber. Something slightly rigid is probably best, as you don't want it to conform to the shape you're applying the paint to. Just put a thin layer of paint on the linoleum piece, and then apply gently and directly, without any side-to-side movement. Fix any missed areas with a very fine brush.

EDIT: You might also get a small roller with a handle at the craft store. Roll it in a dab of paint to get an even layer on the roller, and then gently roll it over the raised lettering. You can easily wipe off any areas where you roll too far.
Oh, heck, just use your finger. Paint some paint on a piece of paper or other disposable surface. Touch that wet pait with one finger, just get a little smear of paint on your fingertip. Touch the finger to part of the raised lettering, very lightly. Touch another part. Touch another part. Repeat until it looks right. Go too far? Get too much paint on there? No problem, just wipe it all away before it dries, and try again. When you're done, wash your finger.*

*this last step is optional.
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Old 05-15-17, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Kevindale View Post
I was also thinking of something like the second method. I would probably use a small piece of linoleum or hard rubber. Something slightly rigid is probably best, as you don't want it to conform to the shape you're applying the paint to. Just put a thin layer of paint on the linoleum piece, and then apply gently and directly, without any side-to-side movement. Fix any missed areas with a very fine brush.

EDIT: You might also get a small roller with a handle at the craft store. Roll it in a dab of paint to get an even layer on the roller, and then gently roll it over the raised lettering. You can easily wipe off any areas where you roll too far.
I was thinking of some sort of hard roller too.
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Old 05-15-17, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by rhm View Post
Oh, heck, just use your finger. Paint some paint on a piece of paper or other disposable surface. Touch that wet pait with one finger, just get a little smear of paint on your fingertip. Touch the finger to part of the raised lettering, very lightly. Touch another part. Touch another part. Repeat until it looks right. Go too far? Get too much paint on there? No problem, just wipe it all away before it dries, and try again. When you're done, wash your finger.*

*this last step is optional.
^^^ This is what I would do. If it was something you were doing all day, sure get a roller. For a one off? Fingers are useful.

You could always put on a latex glove if you're squeamish.
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Old 05-16-17, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
^^^ This is what I would do. If it was something you were doing all day, sure get a roller. For a one off? Fingers are useful.

You could always put on a latex glove if you're squeamish.
A finger, with or without glove, will wipe most of the paint off as you lift your finger if you don't dab it exactly up and down. And if you do dab it up and down, the softness of the finger pads will squish paint down the sides of the raised lettering, and especially into the open sections of some letters like 'R' and 'O'. That's why you need something fairly inflexible and non-squishy to apply the paint, and ideally something that can be rolled across the letters, which leaves the paint behind.

Yeah, it's probably not worth the trouble for most of us. But if you're making a trip to the craft store for fine tip brushes and touch up paint, why not? Those little wood craft rollers sell for probably $6-8, and should make an easy and pretty professional looking job of this.

Personally, this is the kind of thing I'd skip entirely, or do correctly. Blobby and shaky paint looks terrible to me.
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Old 05-17-17, 07:29 AM
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A small rubber (ink type) roller is best I think, firm enough that it won't conform to anything else, very light coats and build on them until you get the required cover/look . . .viola
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