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Modern tech you actually appreciate?

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Modern tech you actually appreciate?

Old 05-25-17, 04:37 PM
  #1  
corrado33
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Modern tech you actually appreciate?

Yes yes yes, this is C&V, why is there a thread about modern tech? That makes no sense.

Well, I'm posing this question to the group of people who frequent this forum because most of us are retro grouches who like to shun new technology.

However, there is always that one piece of new technology that you actually appreciate, or would, if you could get it installed your classic bike.

For me, that'd be through axles on bikes equipped with disc brakes. Here's the reason why.

I own one disc brake equipped bike. It's my mountain bike, and they work GREAT. However, one major problem I've had with it is unrepeatable placement of the axle in the dropouts, making the disc rub or, in the case of rear wheels, QR slipping. Yes yes yes, I'm aware of all the tricks to get the wheels in correctly, but this problem isn't specific to me. 90% of the bikes that come into the shop with disc brakes have this same issue. I always tell the people "you have to put the bike on the ground, then loosen the QR, then wiggle the wheel, then tighten the QR with weight on the axle."

So, I told myself, if I ever buy or build another bike with disc brakes, it'll have through axles. I think it's one of the only modern pieces of bike technology I would make it a point to buy if I were to buy a new (disc brake equipped) bike.

Anything else for me though, not necessary. Old brakes and shifters perform just as well as modern ones. Aluminum, meh, CF, meh, high speed cassettes, meh, etc.
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Old 05-25-17, 04:42 PM
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I like dual pivot brakes.
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Old 05-25-17, 04:49 PM
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Shimano Hollowtech II.

I left my comfort zone (JIS taper BB, cranks) and got an HT2 BB and crank for a relatively new mountain bike frame I'm building up. I stared at it for a few weeks, trying to get my head around it before trying to mount it up. I went slowly, timidly, but finally got it all together after many trips back to the Intarwubz for explanations (the sheets included with the components weren't helpful)...and then it just clicked, I realized how it was meant to work. I found it necessary to fix the chainline...something that would've necessitated replacing a "normal" bottom bracket entirely. With Hollowtech II, adjusting the chainline is a cinch...you just fit spacers behind the drive-side cup until you're satisfied.

Also, the HT2 crank seems to be MUCH stiffer than a "normal" BB and crank. It was weird not to feel any give when putting my weight on it.
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Old 05-25-17, 04:57 PM
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- cushy but inexpensive bar tape
- KoolStop brake pads
- comfortable but inexpensive saddles
- lined cable housings
- SiS
- SLR

All these developments have enhanced my riding experience on bikes that weren't so equipped originally.
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Old 05-25-17, 04:58 PM
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I tried to like quill pedals and clips time and again. I've decided I don't care for them.
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Old 05-25-17, 04:58 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by cb400bill View Post
I like dual pivot brakes.
x2
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Old 05-25-17, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
- cushy but inexpensive bar tape
- koolstop brake pads
- comfortable but inexpensive saddles
- lined cable housings
- sis
- slr

all these developments have enhanced my riding experience on bikes that weren't so equipped originally.
+1
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Old 05-25-17, 04:59 PM
  #8  
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Generator hubs & LED lights are a major improvement, and if you use your bike at night retaining old-style lighting for the sake of period correctness would in my opinion be a foolish indulgence. Pretty much everything else works as well as the newer, or at least well enough that it makes no difference, but with lighting, it is as they say, a "night and day difference."
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Old 05-25-17, 05:00 PM
  #9  
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I certainly concur regarding KoolStop brake pads and improved cable housings.

I concur w/ palincss: For me, the biggest advance is in lighting -- no more dim incandescent bulbs, no more dynamos, no more frequent battery charging, yet far more effective illumination than ever before.
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Old 05-25-17, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
- cushy but inexpensive bar tape
- KoolStop brake pads
- comfortable but inexpensive saddles
- lined cable housings
- SiS
- SLR

All these developments have enhanced my riding experience on bikes that weren't so equipped originally.
KoolStop brake pads are nothing new. They were available back then, both as KoolStop and as Matthauser.
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Old 05-25-17, 05:02 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
I'm posing this question to the group of people who frequent this forum because most of us are retro grouches who like to shun new technology.
Not I.

Although I spend perhaps an inordinate amount of time riding a fixed gear on the road, operate several machines that are decades old regularly the lighter weight, integrated brake/shifters, wider/tighter gearing, powerful brakes, aero efficiency and high reliability of "modern" machines make one welcome to challenge the most difficult terrain and fast pacelines.

Integrated power meters, 'lectric shifting and deep CF wheels: Next up for this old guy.

Ned Lud I am not.

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Old 05-25-17, 05:11 PM
  #12  
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Certainly not high-tech but I do appreciate handlebars wider than 39mm and seat posts longer than 150mm.
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Old 05-25-17, 05:18 PM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
- cushy but inexpensive bar tape
- KoolStop brake pads
- comfortable but inexpensive saddles
- lined cable housings
- SiS
- SLR
This is a good list. I'd add freehubs to the list.

Dual pivot calipers with levers designed for riding on the hoods are almost a requirement for me. I have one bike with single pivot calipers and I feel like if I'm not braking from the drops I need to plan ahead to be able to stop.

I'm not a fan of Brooks saddles. I like lightweight saddles that I can leave out in the rain all day without a second thought. Almost every one of my bikes has either a Specialized Phenom or a Specialized Toupe. I do have a saddle from a 1989 RockHopper that I find acceptable. Anything else generally means I'm planning for a short ride.

I really like integrated brake/shifters. I'm not a particularly graceful person, and when I use downtube shifters you can tell I'm shifting by watching me wobble. It's too bad because I do think downtube shifters look very nice and the indexed variety shift perfectly.
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Old 05-25-17, 05:46 PM
  #14  
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Brifters -before they existed, I prefered bar-cons, and then gripshift (can you imagine?). Brifters are better.

Dual Pivot brakes -being over 200lbs, this one is huge.

Shoes seem way more comfortable out of the box while being stiffer, better ventilated etc...

Bibs are better than shorts. Lycra is better than wool (shorts).

Wider tires (25mm or even 28mm) are way better.

Click-in pedals are better than clips and straps.
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Old 05-25-17, 05:47 PM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
This is a good list. I'd add freehubs to the list.

Dual pivot calipers with levers designed for riding on the hoods are almost a requirement for me. I have one bike with single pivot calipers and I feel like if I'm not braking from the drops I need to plan ahead to be able to stop.

I really like integrated brake/shifters. I'm not a particularly graceful person, and when I use downtube shifters you can tell I'm shifting by watching me wobble. It's too bad because I do think downtube shifters look very nice and the indexed variety shift perfectly.
As usual, I agree with @Andy_K, except we've agreed to disagree about leather saddles. But mine are actually quite new designs if not quite tech-modern, non-Brooks, variants: Gilles Berthoud and Rivet

I appreciate my Crank Bros clipless pedals quite a lot.

Supple, light weight, wide tires at lower pressures are a huge improvement.
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Old 05-25-17, 05:52 PM
  #16  
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I like the better tires(clinchers), better wheel rims(machined braking surface), better brakes(increased mechanical advantage), better shifters(Brifters) and better attachment methods(SPD on all of my riders, never will I trap my foot in a rat trap again).

That said, none of the above does all that much for aesthetic appeal, in my opinion.
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Old 05-25-17, 06:06 PM
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Compact brake levers...I don't know if a smaller lever was ever made back then. I haven't seen any, anyway. But these are a must for me, even if they are still a bit too much. If I can actually find the measurements of the junior brake levers, I might order some lol

Modern saddles.
Compact bars.

Threaded to threadless adapters...stems with removable face plates - There aren't enough options for compact 26.0 bars. I really just like the ease of the modern stems though.

I haven't gotten my dual pivots yet but I'm sure that'll be added to the list.

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Old 05-25-17, 06:11 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by randyjawa View Post
That said, none of the above does all that much for aesthetic appeal, in my opinion.
My minimalist FG century machine is indeed aesthetically pleasing, and works well for it's purpose.

Riding from Leakey TX to Vanderpool for time more functional requirements apply but a CF Merckx looks Good to me while getting up and over where my other old lovely race machines would not cut the same times for me today.

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Old 05-25-17, 06:22 PM
  #19  
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Hmm. Better cyclocomputers. Speedplay pedals. Better helmets. That's about it unless you count aluminum frames.
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Old 05-25-17, 06:35 PM
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+1 led lights and dynamo hubs, also cell phones and gps.

Other stuff, some of it's marginally better, some of it's much better, but I'm having a hard time thinking of anything that makes for a radically better cycling experience. I mean, spd pedals are better than straps and clips... indeed so much better that I use them on most of my longer rides. But I don't really care. Still on the fence about indexed shifting... I mean it's good, definitely good... but friction shifting is good too.
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Old 05-25-17, 06:39 PM
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Current vintage cell phone.
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Old 05-25-17, 06:51 PM
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Hydraulic discs from Shimano

http://bike.shimano.com/content/sac-...ng/brakes.html



Powerful, efficient lighting systems such as:

Niterider Pro 2800 Enduro

https://www.bikerumor.com/2017/01/25...ote-headlight/



Bikepacking gear.

http://www.revelatedesigns.com/

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Old 05-25-17, 06:51 PM
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1X11...so far.
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Old 05-25-17, 06:52 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
Yes yes yes, this is C&V, why is there a thread about modern tech? That makes no sense.

Well, I'm posing this question to the group of people who frequent this forum because most of us are retro grouches who like to shun new technology.

However, there is always that one piece of new technology that you actually appreciate, or would, if you could get it installed your classic bike.

For me, that'd be through axles on bikes equipped with disc brakes. Here's the reason why.

I own one disc brake equipped bike. It's my mountain bike, and they work GREAT. However, one major problem I've had with it is unrepeatable placement of the axle in the dropouts, making the disc rub or, in the case of rear wheels, QR slipping. Yes yes yes, I'm aware of all the tricks to get the wheels in correctly, but this problem isn't specific to me. 90% of the bikes that come into the shop with disc brakes have this same issue. I always tell the people "you have to put the bike on the ground, then loosen the QR, then wiggle the wheel, then tighten the QR with weight on the axle."

So, I told myself, if I ever buy or build another bike with disc brakes, it'll have through axles. I think it's one of the only modern pieces of bike technology I would make it a point to buy if I were to buy a new (disc brake equipped) bike.

Anything else for me though, not necessary. Old brakes and shifters perform just as well as modern ones. Aluminum, meh, CF, meh, high speed cassettes, meh, etc.

Hold on, aren't disc brakes modern technology even if they don't use through axles?

I like blinking taillights. Also plastic water bottles.
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Old 05-25-17, 07:07 PM
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I think pneumatic tires were a much appreciated development.
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