Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Choosing a Bike For Eroica CA...Advice Please

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Choosing a Bike For Eroica CA...Advice Please

Old 07-21-17, 05:18 PM
  #1  
johnbobey
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
johnbobey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: San Diego (Pacific Beach), CA
Posts: 132

Bikes: Nada--I'm pure potential

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Choosing a Bike For Eroica CA...Advice Please

Hello everyone! I'm new to cycling, and have found these pages to be an invaluable resource as I navigate toward my first new/old bike in quite a while (I had a chromed and lugged Panasonic a few years ago that I sold because I'm an idiot). I'm looking to start training for the Long ride (120ish) miles during next April's Eroica CA (I'll turn 49 at the event). I'm in Southern California and looking for something I can ride, as well as train on (physically and mechanically). OK, that's a lot of info...on to my question.

The bike needs to be 1987 or earlier, and I'm open to all makers (though would love something French). I know that leaves a lot of bikes to choose from, so let's say my total budget is $400 or less (including about $100 for any S&H).

I've read good things here about about Japanese mid-80's bikes, but as I said would love something European and a drop older (or even an American make...Schwinn?). Ideally the bike would look as good as it rides, and would be something I could learn to maintain (and be able to find parts for). I take a 61-64cm (I can be flexible). What are your thoughts? I'll take as many opinions as I can get, and please show your bias!

Bikes considered so far:

--A restored-like-new mid-70's Schwinn Continental with NOS parts (61cm, stock parts)
--A 1978-9 Peugeot Course PBN10, Record du Monde (64cm, Peugeot tube special 103, Simplex Prestige derailleur (SX410), Weinmann brakes, ATAX Guidons Philippe handlebar, 700C wheels (Mavic in the rear, Sun M13II in the front)
--A SCHWINN "CHICAGO MADE" TEMPO (61cm, SHIMANO 105 COMPONENTS, COLUMBUS TENAX TUBING, Biopace Crankset with Shimano 6 speed Cassette, rear Wobler Wheelset, Cinelli 64-42 handlebars
--A 1979 Fuji Royale (Dia Compe Drop Forged Brakes, Dia Compe Brake Levers, Nitto Olympiade 114 Handlebar Kenda, Nobby Road 27" Tires, Suntour Downtube Shifters, Forged 170 Crank, Sugino 170mm Crank Road VX Pedals, 6 Speed Freewheel, Suntour VX Rear Derailleur
--A 1969 Schwinn Varsity (61cm, bright yellow and the year I was born)
--A 1986 (61cm) and a 1987 (62cm) Centurion Ironman with Shimano 600 components
--A pro-refurbished 1981 Miyata 710 (63cm, Panaracer Pasela PT tires, inner tubes, Suntour BL and VX derailleurs and Dia Compe "G" brakes. Original San Marco "Concor" Supercorsa leather covered saddle, La Prade seat post and Sakae Super Champion handlebars)

Nothing purchased yet. Thoughts?
johnbobey is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 06:22 PM
  #2  
Wildwood
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 10,862

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 244 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2722 Post(s)
Liked 1,562 Times in 913 Posts
Probably the '86 Ironman.

But it's gotta fit.
For Eroica it needs downtube shifters.
you're golden.

edit: you can acquire the Varsity (birth year nostalgia) but a bit heavy for a long ride in the dirt, and no respect from other riders for piloting the heaviest bike at the Eroica event.

Last edited by Wildwood; 07-21-17 at 06:27 PM.
Wildwood is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 06:32 PM
  #3  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 20,331

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 948 Post(s)
Liked 334 Times in 250 Posts
Skip the Varsity. Pick something that fits you well (top tube length is particularly critical) and which can accommodate true 28mm, if not 32mm tires (not the callout size, which sometimes exceeds the actual width) for the dirt.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 06:34 PM
  #4  
obrentharris 
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Point Reyes Station, California
Posts: 3,384

Bikes: Indeed!

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 960 Post(s)
Liked 1,006 Times in 416 Posts
Forget the Continental and the Varsity unless you are a real powerhouse and a glutton for punishment. The Eroica long course has some real hills in it. You will likely curse the extra weight of those bikes.

I agree with Wildwood that the Centurion is a good choice, but be realistic about the gears you put on it. Moat of us who aren't ex pro racers are using small chainrings in the 30 to 39 tooth range and large cogs in the 26 to 30 tooth range. Buy something that will accommodate 28mm tires (or larger) for the gravel sections.

And, as Wildwood said, make sure the bike you buy fits you!
Brent

You have time. Don't be in a hurry to buy a bike.
obrentharris is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 07:07 PM
  #5  
Bad Lag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 1,392

Bikes: 1975 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 78 Posts
...though would love something French...


ix-Nay on the ench-Fray

Bikes considered so far:

--A restored-like-new mid-70's Schwinn Continental with NOS parts (61cm, stock parts)
NO
--A 1978-9 Peugeot Course PBN10, Record du Monde (64cm, Peugeot tube special 103, Simplex Prestige derailleur (SX410), Weinmann brakes, ATAX Guidons Philippe handlebar, 700C wheels (Mavic in the rear, Sun M13II in the front)
NO

--A SCHWINN "CHICAGO MADE" TEMPO (61cm, SHIMANO 105 COMPONENTS, COLUMBUS TENAX TUBING, Biopace Crankset with Shimano 6 speed Cassette, rear Wobler Wheelset, Cinelli 64-42 handlebars
NO

--A 1979 Fuji Royale (Dia Compe Drop Forged Brakes, Dia Compe Brake Levers, Nitto Olympiade 114 Handlebar Kenda, Nobby Road 27" Tires, Suntour Downtube Shifters, Forged 170 Crank, Sugino 170mm Crank Road VX Pedals, 6 Speed Freewheel, Suntour VX Rear Derailleur
MAYBE

--A 1969 Schwinn Varsity (61cm, bright yellow and the year I was born)
ABSOLUTELY NOT

--A 1986 (61cm) and a 1987 (62cm) Centurion Ironman with Shimano 600 components
MAYBE

--A pro-refurbished 1981 Miyata 710 (63cm, Panaracer Pasela PT tires, inner tubes, Suntour BL and VX derailleurs and Dia Compe "G" brakes. Original San Marco "Concor" Supercorsa leather covered saddle, La Prade seat post and Sakae Super Champion handlebars)
MAYBE


My thoughts.


Filet brazed Schwinns are boat anchors.

Get something with a triple crank up front and a wide range rear freewheel (5 or 6 speed).

Get a good rear derailleur to make shifting as good as it can be with the wide range gearing.

DO NOT GET SKINNY RACING-TYPE TIRES. Something in the 28-32 mm range would be good. Wider is better, as long as it is a light weight, quality tire. Be sure the frame can handle wide tires.

Be sure the bike fits you. Be sure the saddle is comfortable. It has to have good brakes and good brake pads.

Train on the bike you plan to ride. Train on the bike configured as you plan to ride it.

Last edited by Bad Lag; 07-21-17 at 07:18 PM.
Bad Lag is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 07:36 PM
  #6  
rccardr 
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 6,362

Bikes: Lots. Just...lots.

Mentioned: 177 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1485 Post(s)
Liked 766 Times in 376 Posts
Of the list given, the 86 Ironman would work-takes 28's (done this event on 28's, they are fine), but needs a different crankset with 50/34 rings and a 13-28 freewheel. Plus (unlike the Tempo) it uses the superior Shimano hubs, which can be repacked and serviced.

I wouldn't attempt this event without a 34-28 low gear combination, but that's just me.
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 08:17 PM
  #7  
Slightspeed
Senior Member
 
Slightspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,210

Bikes: 1964 Legnano Roma Olympiade, 1973 Raleigh Super Course, 1978 Raleigh Super Course, 1978 Peugeot PR10, 2002 Specialized Allez, 2007 Specialized Roubaix, 2013 Culprit Croz Blade

Mentioned: 64 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 720 Post(s)
Liked 701 Times in 380 Posts
Lots of big frame vintage on LA Craigslist. Saw a big Raleigh for $199.

Looking at your list, forget the Schwinns, too heavy. I actually did my first race on a Continental. Not good. I would take a good look at the Miyata. The Suntour stuff is good, cheap, and reliable. 28 Paselas are a good choice.

I rode my '64 Legnano last year with a 42/28 lowest gear and walked 3 hills. You can't bring too much gear there unless you are a mountain goat. I built up a '73 Raleigh Super Course with a Sugino AT triple and a 34 tooth 6 speed rear freewheel for next time. The pic below is an early testing pic, now has 28 Paselas and will need dreaded toe straps and cages. Just sayin ...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
2017-05-07 19.43.05.jpg (100.9 KB, 234 views)

Last edited by Slightspeed; 07-21-17 at 08:38 PM.
Slightspeed is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 08:28 PM
  #8  
jimincalif
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Lake Forest, CA
Posts: 2,306

Bikes: '96 Trek 850, '08 Specialized Roubaix Comp, '18 Niner RLT RDO

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 563 Post(s)
Liked 104 Times in 66 Posts
I did the 87 mile route this year, a friend set me up on a Nishiki Prestige of his. It had 28mm tires and a triple. I think the low gear was 26/28 and I needed every bit of it on Cypress mountain. The 28s were fine, but if I were getting my own bike for it I would try for something that will handle 32s that can run at lower psi. My body (age 59) felt kinda beat up afterwards.

Beautiful area and the ride was well run.
jimincalif is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 09:12 PM
  #9  
coolkat
Cyclist
 
coolkat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Seattle/Victoria bc
Posts: 591

Bikes: '84 Univega Specialissima, Surly Cross Check, '88 Kuwahara Cascade, '18 Specialized Fuse Comp, '87 and '92 Rocky Mountain Blizzards

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Everyone's rejecting the Tempo, but it's the nicest bike of the list...
coolkat is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 09:27 PM
  #10  
Bigrig8600
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Slightly to the left
Posts: 11

Bikes: '72 Peugeot UO-8, '83 Univega Gran Preimo, '85 Nishiki Sport restomod

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm honestly not to familiar with those bikes on your list. Nevertheless, I've seen some very nice "Chromoly" frame bikes from the early 80's from Japanese brands for sale online for not as much as you would think. They are something to consider, light and fast.

I heard this year Eroica CA is allowing freewheels other than the original to mounted to the bikes. Since the route for Erioca CA is rather hilly it is also worth considering getting a larger ratio freewheel. But, I'm sure you will enjoy yourself no matter what you get to ride.

-C.J.
Bigrig8600 is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 09:49 PM
  #11  
cdmurphy 
Senior Member
 
cdmurphy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: San Marcos, CA
Posts: 567

Bikes: Too many, but sometimes not enough.

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 225 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Of your list, I'd go with either the Tempo (should be cheap, but is a quality bike), or the Miyata. The Ironman is a great bike too, but 28mm tires will be tight, if they'll even fit. (Different years had more or less clearance).

Whatever you do, I wouldn't sink much money into it. The odds of picking your perfect bike right off the bat are pretty slim.

Personally, I would look at any of the Japanese sport touring bikes from the mid 70s through maybe 1982. They'll likely have clearance 32mm tires, or likely come stock with 27x1 1/4" tires (effectively the same size as 32s). They won't have the cache or bling of some of the nice Italian or French bikes, but you could find nice ones for $150-$300 all day long. The Centurion Super Elite is particularly nice. Almost the same frame specs and components as their Semi Pro, without the chrome. I see them listed regularly between $100 and $200.
cdmurphy is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 10:00 PM
  #12  
Bad Lag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 1,392

Bikes: 1975 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 78 Posts
Originally Posted by coolkat View Post
Everyone's rejecting the Tempo, but it's the nicest bike of the list...


I rejected only the filet brazed Schwinns. That Tempo is nice but it is not clear that it can accommodate the wider tires. Be careful of the gearing - you need to have a triple and a wide range rear.
Bad Lag is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 10:39 PM
  #13  
capnjonny 
Senior Member
 
capnjonny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Saratoga calif.
Posts: 723

Bikes: Miyata 610(66cm), GT Vantara Hybrid (64cm), Nishiki International (64cm), Peugeot rat rod (62 cm), Trek 800 Burning Man helicopter bike, Bob Jackson frame (to be restored?) plus a never ending stream of neglected waifs from the Bike exchange.

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 107 Times in 62 Posts
Just finished re habing a Schwinn Varsity - the heaviest "lightweight" bike I have ever seen. For an endurance race across the Sahara it would probably be the only one left at the end of the race. For a mere hundred miler it would be like dragging an anchor.

Personally I would jump on the Miyata if it fits . I don't think they ever made a bad bike. That is a high end model and has decent gear on it.
capnjonny is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 11:31 PM
  #14  
denny1969
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Northern California
Posts: 114

Bikes: 2006 Felt F4C, 1985 Schwinn Tempo

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I saw an '85 Schwinn Tempo in the size range that you are looking for in the LA Craigslist for $75. I own a resto-mod built with this frameset, and it rides rather smoothly. I know that there is ample room for 28 mm tires. 32 mm tires may be pushing the limits.

Here is the link. https://losangeles.craigslist.org/sf...224110763.html

At that price, you could modify it for the course. New tires, tubes, consumables, and a triple drive train could be had well under your $400 budget.

Have fun with your project and the ride.

Dennis

Edit: Just in case you did not see this on the Eroica California website: https://www.eroicacalifornia.com/new...ke-on-a-budget

Last edited by denny1969; 07-21-17 at 11:35 PM. Reason: added a link
denny1969 is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 12:03 AM
  #15  
coolkat
Cyclist
 
coolkat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Seattle/Victoria bc
Posts: 591

Bikes: '84 Univega Specialissima, Surly Cross Check, '88 Kuwahara Cascade, '18 Specialized Fuse Comp, '87 and '92 Rocky Mountain Blizzards

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Bad Lag View Post
I rejected only the filet brazed Schwinns. That Tempo is nice but it is not clear that it can accommodate the wider tires. Be careful of the gearing - you need to have a triple and a wide range rear.
There are no Fillet-Brazed Schwinns on that list (New World, Super Sport, Sports Tourer, and Superior are the only ones I know of)
coolkat is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 05:17 AM
  #16  
Pompiere
Senior Member
 
Pompiere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 2,749

Bikes: 1984 Miyata 310, 1986 Schwinn Sierra, 2011 Jamis Quest, 1980 Peugeot TH8 Tandem, 1992 Performance Parabola, 1987 Ross Mt. Hood, 1988 Schwinn LeTour, 1988 Trek 400T, 1981 Fuji S12-S LTD

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 298 Post(s)
Liked 136 Times in 105 Posts
Originally Posted by coolkat View Post
There are no Fillet-Brazed Schwinns on that list (New World, Super Sport, Sports Tourer, and Superior are the only ones I know of)
This is true, Varsity and Continental were Electro-Forged. https://www.sheldonbrown.com/varsity.html

The Schwinn filet brazed bikes were actually not that bad.

The Tempo was more likely made in Mississippi. The head badges still said "Schwinn Chicago", since that was the headquarters (and probably tradition).
Pompiere is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 05:44 AM
  #17  
plonz 
Senior Member
 
plonz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 2,383
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 507 Post(s)
Liked 164 Times in 117 Posts
^To echo... nothing wrong with a Schwinn Tempo at the right price.

For reasons I cannot explain, I prefer riding my Tempo over my Ironman.
plonz is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 06:34 AM
  #18  
jcb3
Senior Member
 
jcb3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 610

Bikes: 1983 Trek 700, 1972 Peugeot PX10, 1989 Nishiki Cascade, 2014 Focus Izalco

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
I'm in Orange County and would be glad to help. I know a few sources for local bikes (and I'm sure some of the other So Cal members can help as well) and can help you focus in once you decide on a size.

For example, this guy (who I've bought a couple bikes from) has others in your size range - some will need more work than others.

https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/...207876853.html


For Eroica, being able to expand your gearing is important.

Also it would be good to understand your mechanic skill level.

Feel free to email me and we can discuss further.

joe.bellas#gmail.com
jcb3 is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 06:35 AM
  #19  
Chr0m0ly 
Senior Member
 
Chr0m0ly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Back in Lincoln Sq, Chicago...🙄
Posts: 1,582

Bikes: '84 Miyata 610 91 Cannondale ST600,'83 Trek 720 84 Trek 520, 620, 91 Miyata 1000LT, '79 Trek 514, '78 Trek 706, '73 Raleigh Int. frame.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 623 Post(s)
Liked 239 Times in 152 Posts
I currently have an '85 and an '86 Miyata 710. The 85 has 28mm tires on it now and would still take fenders, a ton of space on that one. The '86 is tighter clearanced, it has 25mm and would not fit fenders without some finagling. The '81 710 has a double butted Tange Champion frame mated to Miyata brand Hi-ten forks and triangle, so the frame is well suited. It's also gets down to 39/24 which is prettty good. That's a small front cog for a road bike.

I'd go Miyata the Ironman is a "better bike" but not for your use. I mean ideally you'd find a touring bike, right? Canti brakes and a triple front? You can find deals on Craigslist if you look for "road bike" and set the price limit to $200.00. Then keep an eye out for cantilevered brakes.

I like the Miyata though. :-D
Chr0m0ly is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 06:50 AM
  #20  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 18,225

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 156 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5007 Post(s)
Liked 1,500 Times in 993 Posts
Originally Posted by jcb3 View Post
I'm in Orange County and would be glad to help. I know a few sources for local bikes (and I'm sure some of the other So Cal members can help as well) and can help you focus in once you decide on a size.

For example, this guy (who I've bought a couple bikes from) has others in your size range - some will need more work than others.

https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/...207876853.html


For Eroica, being able to expand your gearing is important.

Also it would be good to understand your mechanic skill level.

Feel free to email me and we can discuss further.

joe.bellas#gmail.com
Really nice looking bike. I worked in a bike shop that sold a lot of peugeots. There was a PX 10 that came with campagnolo nuovo record but I've never seen one that came stock with gran sport. I don't believe it came with an avocet touring saddle. It's hard to tell from the pics what the RD is but that does not look like a gran sport RD but a later model. I almost bought that model bike when I worked in a shop as I was racing then. Still wish I had, : )

These are minor points. The bike is hot. If the parts are original to the bike, it is likely because the PO had the shop build the bike up with those parts.

One really nice thing about that bike is if the rear drop out plays nicely with a campy RD then it will play nicely with a long cage suntour as well. I believe that the peugeots that came with campy stuff had a simplex drop out that was properly set up for campy style derailleurs so there will be no need to mod the drop out.

Last edited by bikemig; 07-22-17 at 06:55 AM.
bikemig is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 07:35 AM
  #21  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 18,225

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 156 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5007 Post(s)
Liked 1,500 Times in 993 Posts
I love French bikes as well but there is a lot to be said for the bikes you listed since they all are english threaded. It will be a lot easier to modify one of these to suit your needs. French bikes have their quirks which can make them more of a challenge to fix up. https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...nch-bikes.html

As others have pointed out, gearing and tire size are important considerations.

It is also not clear what size you need since the listed bikes run from 61 to 63 cm. If a 63 fits, I just listed a 63 cm mid 70s Gitane Tour de France for sale. Although I believe you can build the frame up and come close to your proposed budget, it will take some hunting around to do so. You are very likely to be over budget if you start with a frame. There is no doubt that it is typically more cost effective to buy a complete bike rather than start with a frame.

@jcb3 in post 18 makes a really good point; which bike you buy (and whether you are willing to build from a frame) depends on your mechanical skill level.

Here is the listing:

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...l#post19737106

Last edited by bikemig; 07-22-17 at 08:11 AM.
bikemig is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 08:26 AM
  #22  
jcb3
Senior Member
 
jcb3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 610

Bikes: 1983 Trek 700, 1972 Peugeot PX10, 1989 Nishiki Cascade, 2014 Focus Izalco

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by jimincalif View Post
I did the 87 mile route this year, a friend set me up on a Nishiki Prestige of his. It had 28mm tires and a triple. I think the low gear was 26/28 and I needed every bit of it on Cypress mountain. The 28s were fine, but if I were getting my own bike for it I would try for something that will handle 32s that can run at lower psi. My body (age 59) felt kinda beat up afterwards.

Beautiful area and the ride was well run.

My point earlier about contacting local BF members that can help (and have several extra bikes floating around the garage) - The 63cm Prestige Jim rode is a build up I did for my kid, but I could be persuaded to part with it for well within the OP's price range. It is not pristine nor 100% original, but it is a really nice ride and it is Eroica ready.

Joe
jcb3 is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 08:52 AM
  #23  
Falcon3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: E Wa
Posts: 626
Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I love the Ironman, but my 86 hates 28c Conti GP4000Sii. I've got about 1mm clearance btw the rear tire and the derailleur clamp, which would not suffice on gravel. I believe the Tempo would have more tire clearance. Perhaps add an older Trek sport tourer to your list as well. My 82 Trek 730 fits 28c with ease, and it's in the racing lineup. The sport touring models should get you to 32 and be sporty about it.
Falcon3 is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 10:11 AM
  #24  
Chr0m0ly 
Senior Member
 
Chr0m0ly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Back in Lincoln Sq, Chicago...🙄
Posts: 1,582

Bikes: '84 Miyata 610 91 Cannondale ST600,'83 Trek 720 84 Trek 520, 620, 91 Miyata 1000LT, '79 Trek 514, '78 Trek 706, '73 Raleigh Int. frame.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 623 Post(s)
Liked 239 Times in 152 Posts
Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post
I love the Ironman, but my 86 hates 28c Conti GP4000Sii. I've got about 1mm clearance btw the rear tire and the derailleur clamp, which would not suffice on gravel. I believe the Tempo would have more tire clearance. Perhaps add an older Trek sport tourer to your list as well. My 82 Trek 730 fits 28c with ease, and it's in the racing lineup. The sport touring models should get you to 32 and be sporty about it.
My '84 has 700x28's and would take 32mm without fenders. The 700c wheels replace the 27 inchers with the original brakes, plenty of room for pad adjustment.

Come to think of it, 1985 to 1986 seems to be when a lot of the sport bikes started to get more specialized. Less fender brazes, less tire clearence, etc.
Chr0m0ly is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 10:28 AM
  #25  
Bad Lag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 1,392

Bikes: 1975 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 509 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 78 Posts
Originally Posted by coolkat View Post
There are no Fillet-Brazed Schwinns on that list (New World, Super Sport, Sports Tourer, and Superior are the only ones I know of)


Thank you for the clarification. I was trying to refer to the Schwinn Continental and Varsity on his list and any others of that ilk he might come across. They are boat anchors and will suck the life out of your legs.




What I was struggling with in all cases is the absence of photos. Condition is important with the upcoming training and the ride itself.


Also, without photos I have no knowledge about whether the bike can take 28 - 32 mm tires. Many of the bikes in the 1980's had very close spacing between the tires and the frames and could not take anything but very skinny tires.
Bad Lag is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.