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Do classic road stems make sense?

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Do classic road stems make sense?

Old 09-02-17, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by hoyc
Probably an unpopular opinion, but I rather dislike the look of such a tall stem with the regular "7"-shape negative rise. There are a few 0deg quill stems that are being made.

I've also noticed with some newer gravel/touring style bikes, this "limp" stem is coming back into vogue. I hated it at first, but I'm starting to come around...
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Old 09-02-17, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Wildwood
An even better reason for the 65+ thread.
That made me laugh.
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Old 05-23-19, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney
No headset to deal with.
...unless the headset comes loose in the middle of a ride, which can only be fixed with two huge spanners instead of a single Allen key. And who carries these on a ride?
https://www.parktool.com/product/headset-wrench-hcw-7

Originally Posted by 79pmooney
No torque wrench.
Quill stems do need a torque wrench to avoid bulging the steerer while still being tight enough to the grip the steering despite the seizure-preventing grease.

Originally Posted by 79pmooney
1 6mm wrench (and maybe a rock to tap the wrench and dislodge the tapered nut).
...and a hacksaw and a pair of Vice-Grips:
...and a cable winch, a metal pipe, and a 2x4:
...and Drano:
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Old 05-30-19, 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by satrain18
...unless the headset comes loose in the middle of a ride, which can only be fixed with two huge spanners instead of a single Allen key. And who carries these on a ride?

Quill stems do need a torque wrench to avoid bulging the steerer while still being tight enough to the grip the steering despite the seizure-preventing grease.

...and a hacksaw and a pair of Vice-Grips:
...and a cable winch, a metal pipe, and a 2x4:
...and Drano:
Properly tightened, headsets rarely come loose enough to be a ride stopper. I don't know if I have ever seen it. (I knew a lot less 50 years ago and that was pre-head-injury so I 'won't swear to that.) I've certainly never needed the spanners to get home. (And if you have a keyed washer and greased threads, odds are that any large crescent will do for the adjustment. So any farmer, many garage mechanics, etc.

Never used that torque wrench in 50 years. Hasn't been an issue. (It only has to be tight enough so you can steer and it doesn't slip down, A short allen key and mediocre strength works fine.

...and a hacksaw and a pair of Vice-Grips:
...and a cable winch, a metal pipe, and a 2x4:
...and Drano

Good tools to have (if you own the property you live in. For headsets and stems? Yeah, for that $20 as-is beater. Not my bikes.

Sorry about taking so long to see your reply.

Ben
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Old 05-30-19, 10:26 PM
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An ounce of grease applied to the stem up front avoids allot of swearing, drano, hacksaws, metal pipes etc. later
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Old 05-30-19, 10:51 PM
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As long as we are zombie threading...

Keep everything well greased and overhauled and there was rarely any problems with vintage/classic stems. If you rode giant miles - like over 100,000 miles - there could be on lightly built bikes. Sweat and pre stress takes it toll.

BITD you woud ride the largest frame you could, so stem height wasn't a big issue. Generally it was between even with the bars, to about 2 inches down -- for racers...

I still like my bars about 2" down. Higher feels weird. In my 50s now... BITD it would be 3 or 4". That was the LeMond era. Rather extreme.
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Old 05-30-19, 11:16 PM
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I had the quill stem come loose on my Peugeot the other day. My riding partner did an unexpected turn into a driveway, and I turned quickly to miss him. After that, I couldn't ride straight. It was like I was drunk or something. The stem had shifted 15 or 20 from straight. Bring French, it takes a hex wrench I didn't have along on the ride. 7mm? I have 6 and 8mm. I used the 6mm at kind of an angle and sort of got it snughed up, but checked it several times during the 25 miles home. This was on California PCH, with 60 mph traffic on the left and rocks and ocean on the right. Not a happy ride home. It's a PR10 with Atax alloy stem.

My problem Peugeot stem.

Last edited by Slightspeed; 05-30-19 at 11:22 PM.
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